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Reddit reviews: The best industrial & scientific

We found 29,159 Reddit comments discussing the best industrial & scientific. We ran sentiment analysis on each of these comments to determine how redditors feel about different products. We found 11,986 products and ranked them based on the amount of positive reactions they received. Here are the top 20.

Top Reddit comments about Industrial & Scientific:

u/RockyMtnAristocrat · 7 pointsr/wicked_edge

I think you should pick up another straight that has been honed to shave ready. Larry at Whipped Dog has some very affordable blades that are supposed to be shave ready. You can use this as a measure to getting your blade up to snuff.

Also, technique may be an issue. But you've been shaving a while....

If you can't get it keen on a 4K, you may need to set that bevel again... There is no formula for bevel setting, just a feeling. I'd blunt the blade on a thumbnail, then hone until you can easily pop hair with the edge. Then, move up a measured progression like pyramid honing.

Here's a copy past I did you might find useful:

Equipment Essentials

  • A pro honed razor at your side. You need to compare the sharpness of the razor you're working on, with the sharpness of a razor that is shave ready. This will decrease your learning curve considerably. You're working blind otherwise.

  • DMT flattening stone. Your hones don't ship flat, and you must even them out to ensure a smooth edge. Flattening before every use is a good idea. If you don't want to buy the DMT, use 400 grit wet/dry sandpaper and atop piece of marble/glass.

  • Norton 4K/8K A popular choice for general honing, and can perform a laborious restoration/bevel set (if you do more than a few razors, get the 1k below to set a bevel).

  • A jewelers loop to see what happens to the blade as you hone, polish, stop and shave. I feel watching the scratch patterns of a straight razor bevel change is a critical educational step in straight razor bevel maintenance.

  • Chromium Oxide on a strop for final polish, or a diamond pasted strop.


    Honing Supplies for Restoring a Few Straights

  • If you end up honing a few razor from antique stores or ebay, it's good to have a stone dedicated to bevel setting. This stage is 50% of the sharpening process, so it pays to have quality gear at this level King 1000 K For bevel setting on a budget (beware, it's a slow cutter). Or a nice bevel setter like this Chosera.


  • Niawa 12K For a nice final polishing of your razor. 8K is fine, but this puts a great edge on your blade.

    To hone:

    First, you need to flatten your stone, making sure you've removed the top 1/64th or so of stone material to reach the true grits (the top is a bit rough on Nortons especially).Make sure your stone is perfectly flat. Use the DMT or the sandpaper I described above for this.

    Next, clean your SR in soap/warm water. Dry it, and put a piece of electrical tape along the spine and fold it over (like a book binding) if you'd like (not necessary, and I don't do this, but some prefer the look of the end product).

    I like to clear the edge of possible errand burs before I hone, so I drag the shaving edge against my thumbnail or a glass bottle. These burs can cause issues, and may make for a rough feeling edge. I've found that this is a good way to remove them. It may be unnecessary for some/most blades, but it's part of my bevel setting routine, and by doing this, I've notice good things and increased consistency when I hone.

    Now, to hone. You're going to get your razor sharp in these stages:

  • Set the bevel (establish the sharp edge shape)
  • Polish the bevel (polish the shape you created earlier)
  • True the bevel (strop the bevel to make sure the edge is very uniform)

    Setting the bevel:

    While all steps are important, this step is foundational. Place your razor on your bevel setting stone, keeping the razor spine and edge completely flat on the surface togehter. Do tiny circle strokes (circular motion down the hone) so you do about 30-40 tiny circles as you move own the bottom hone. Repeat on the other side of the razor, moving up the hone in the opposite direction (and counter-wise circle direction). Now do 15 x strokes. This is a set.

    Repeat doing these sets until you can shave hair on your arm or leg by very slowly grazing over the tops of the hair - it should catch and cut with a bit of a tug.

    It will take many many of these sets with a 4k stone, and less with a 1K.

    Once you can shave hair on your arm or leg all along the bevel (toe to heel) with uniform sharpness and cutting, you may be set. Do another 10 or so x-strokes, very lightly, very perfectly as a final sharpening for your bevel. See if this helps your edge.

    Once you're happy with your bevel, strop it and shave. If it's painful, it's likely your bevel isn't set. If it's decent, you're ready to move on.

    Polishing the bevel

    Now move up to polishing. On the 4K and do 35 light x strokes. Go to the 8K and do 35 light x-strokes. Repeat this back and forth going 4K 30, 8K 30. Now keep this up, decreasing the stroke number by 5. When you're at 10 strokes, just do 25 on the 8K.

    Always check for sharpness along the edge by trimming a bit of arm hair. You'll learn a lot from an edge by doing this.

    Following the grits up in this fashion should give you a fairly polished bevel. It's best to go higher than 8K with a high grit chinese hone from a woodworking store, or a naninwa 12k, but 8K will do for now.

    Truing the edge:

    Strop about 30 passes on your chromium oxide, clean the blade, and the perform 200 passes on leather - all spine leading, done very lightly.

    The Shave

    After all this, you should have a great edge. Give it a test shave and compare it to your pro honed blade.

    While honing, you'll likely get frustrated, but keep at it! If you're getting aggressive with the razor, just give it a break, and come back later. If the shave is no good, post back here and we'll help you diagnose.


    Some thoughts:

    I tired to present information that's very searchable. Straight razor place has archived many of the ideas that I just presented. I highly recommend researching on your own and reaching a personal conclusion. What follows are my personal opinions.

    This equipment I suggest is not necessarily the best, nor is it bad at all. It's great way to get started and find out what you like in a stone/routine. Some ideas to consider if you upgrade your set:

  • Try a natural stone for a finisher. I use a vintage Thuringian hone called an Barber's Delight Escher.
  • Upgrade your progression by adding various in-between grits. I really like going from a Chosera 1K, to Shapton Pro (not glass version) 2K, 5K, 8K, 15K, then finish.
  • Try finishing a blade with a pasted strop, and try without. Some love one over the other.

    The back and forth honing I recommend is a honing series called pyramid honing, where you go between two different grit hones to ensure you don't form a wire edge or a bur. I like to recommend this for folks getting into honing since this is one of the most documented methods for get a razor to shave ready from a bevel set. A quick google search on pyramid honing will give you plenty of reading. I don't hone this way any more.

    I highly recommend honing your razor as sharp as possible on one stone, strop as I've outlined, and give it a shave. For example, sharpen as much as you can at the 4K stage, and strop it 200 times. If it shaves ok, you're on the right track. If not, you've got more work to do at that level of stone. You'll be amazed that such a low grit can shave so well. If it's painful to shave after your lowest stone.... you're not done, and moving up the stones will not benefit your edge. Repeating this process of shaving up all the stone grits (4K, 8K, 12K) will help you get a feel for what honing at the different levels provide. Shaving off my 1K bevel provided me the biggest leap in edge quality while learning.

    Don't limit your techniques. Once you can confidently bring a restored razor to shave with consistency, I'd recommend playing around and experimenting. Though this, I've developed some strokes that are critical to my routine, and used effectively with every blade I sharpen.
u/EverydayEnthusiast · 3 pointsr/dndnext

The MTG Arena of the Planeswalkers board games, if you can get them cheap enough, are a fantastic value for a bunch of minis. I got 2 copies of all three games (really like 2.5 games because one is much smaller) for less than $50 at one point. Mostly humanoid minis, but some interesting models. And the planeswalkers come painted. They don't seem to be on sale on Amazon right now, but if you shop around, I imagine you'll be able to find these cheap somewhere.

Similarly, the D&D Adventure board games often go on sale and are pretty fantastic deal for the quantity, variety, and quality of minis you get. I think the Elemental Evil one is the best as it gives you the 4 elementals, an ettin, and a young black dragon (in addition to all the humanoid sized minis). If you can get it cheap somewhere, it's great! The Castle Ravenloft version is probably the second best, in my option.

Finally, if you're really wanting to dive deep, you could look at 3D printing. It's not the most economical route (unless you're planning on having a huge collection), but it's an entire hobby in itself that supports your other hobby! Great for custom minis, terrain pieces, and having the exact mons you need for next week's game. The Anycubic Photon is an absolute beast of a little resin printer that often goes on sale (I wouldn't be surprised if you can get it for sub $300 on Black Friday) that will give amazing detail with little effort/trouble, and the Ender 3 is a very cheap filament printer that seems to preform really reliably for the price (I do not own this machine, so I'm only speaking based on what I've seen others say). What's cool about the 3D printing route is that just about any monster you can think of as a free model available somewhere online, because the TTRPG 3d printing community is so active!

I hope that helps! Best of luck!

EDIT: changed the link for the Anycubic Photon. Looks like it's $260 on the AC website right now. This is a fantastic price for this machine. A newer alternative is the Elegoo Mars. Hearing fantastic things about it for about the same price.

u/_ataraxia · 3 pointsr/ballpython

your BP isn't just thin, she's emaciated. you need to put some weight on her, but you need to do so gradually. you also really need to feed her f/t before she gets injured by live prey. if your enclosure is meeting her needs, and you're not causing her stress by handling her unnecessarily, she should eat f/t for you just fine. i guarantee she wasn't eating f/t at petsmart because she was stressed due to poor husbandry.

i'm going to dump a TON of information on you. some of it may be redundant, some of it may be useful. first, three detailed care sheets, a tub setup tutorial, and product recommendations to cover all types of enclosures. then i'll give you a breakdown of how i handled my emaciated BP, simultaneously putting weight on her safely and switching her from mice to rats. you'll fine more generalized feeding tips in the third care sheet. read everything thoroughly, then come back with any questions.

since i don't see any mention of what your enclosure is like, i'll start with this: glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.

    now for a suggested feeding regimen. if your BP will genuinely only eat live right now, you can safely start her on appropriately sized rat pinkies/fuzzies/pups. if their eyes haven't opened yet, they won't be able to bite her hard enough to cause injuries. once she fills out a little and can more comfortably skip a few meals, you should start working on switching her to f/t.

    at the time of rescue, my BP's weight was 140g, meals were one fuzzy mouse with an estimated weight of 5g, meal schedule was "once every few weeks". here's a breakdown of the meal sizes, schedule, and switch from mice to rats i used. this is all f/t, so dealing with live will be a little different.

  • week 1: settling in.
  • week 2: one fuzzy mouse, 5g, ~3% of BP's weight.
  • week 3: two fuzzy mice, total 8g, ~5%.
  • week 4: one fuzzy mouse, 5g. one rat pinky scented with the mouse, 5g. total 10g, ~7%.
  • week 5: BP weight 155g. one hopper mouse, 10g. one scented rat pinky, 6g. total 17g, ~10%.
  • week 6: one adult mouse, 14g. one scented rat pinky, 6g. total 19g, ~13%.
  • week 7: one fuzzy mouse, 4g. one scented rat pup, 20g. total 24g, ~15%.
  • week 8: BP weight 160g. one scented rat pup, 24g, ~15%.

    i continued scenting her rats for another couple of months, but that was more because it was easy [i have a corn who eats mice] than it being necessary. she was readily eating unscented rats within five months. a couple years later, i usually don't even have to warm up her rats beyond room temperature, though she does require some dangling with the tongs as she won't eat anything she hasn't "killed".
u/ThePienosaur · 11 pointsr/ballpython

Red light isn't good, you'll want a heat mat (MAKE SURE you have a thermostat for it or it will get too hot) and possibly a ceramic heat emitter (also needs a thermostat) for air heat. What are the temps and humidity and how do you measure them? Glass tanks usually don't hold humidity well and often aren't good for bps. You need at least 2 good hides, one for each side. They should be snug and enclosed with only one opening, preferably identical, half logs don't work.

Someone should come by with a really good care sheet, read it, it has some great info. I know this might be a lot of information, but having a good setup is important and will save you headaches in the future.

Edit: I found the care sheet. Credit to u/_ataraxia.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/metameh · 1 pointr/Warhammer40k

Welcome to the hobby!

  1. Short answer: No. Long answer: -ish, but mostly no. DIfferent sub-factions have access to different tactics, stratagems, and units, but no-one worth playing with is going to fault you for running your red painted marines as Ultramarines or vice versa.

  2. I recommend this brand/style of paint set If you keep your focus small, these paints will last you a long time. For washes, I recommend this and this to start. Using a spray can from Army painter is also an easy way to get your base coat down. Brushes are a tricky thing to recommend. Some of the best miniature painters in the world use the cheapest brushes so there's no way to make a solid recommendation. FWIW, I've used the citadel (point wouldn't keep), army painter (too soft), and vallejo brushes and prefer that latter far more.

  3. Generally, 2 thin coats. It can be more with lower pigmented paints (like Reaper) or if you're trying to paint a lighter color on a dark undercoat. As mentioned above, you can also use army painter rattle cans to do your undercoat. Then they're just detail work and a wash away from "table top standard".

  4. Youtube is full of great hobby videos. This video has a good run down of some common and uncommon brands of paint. They also have a useful video for washes.

  5. Variable. Beginners will always take longer. Some minis are more complicated than others. Some may require extra steps like washing before assembly. For plastic models [this](https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B003Y49R7G?aaxitk=yw87pCjpm4VEKpuh.qGtFQ&pd_rd_i=B003Y49R7G&pf_rd_p=44fc3e0f-4b9e-4ed8-b33b-363a7257163d&hsa_cr_id=6960164520701&sb-ci-n=productDescription&sb-ci-v=Loctite%20Ultra%20Gel%20Control%20Super%20Glue%204-Gram%20(1363589) is a great glue. Spraying on your base coat will definitely speed things up, but the more detailed a model is, the longer it will take. Some people even drill holes and glue in magnets so the can swap weapons around on their minis.

  6. Yes, but I really would advise against starting with Dark Imperium. It's a good deal if you are intent on getting into full army battles and you know you'll make use of both factions/be able to sell one. Kill Team is a better entry point because the only investment in plastic crack you need to make is one box of troops for your preferred faction. It will also give you a feel for the rules and if this is a game you like enough to invest in.

    One more thing: terrain makes games of 40K great, but buying manufactured terrain can be very expensive. I recommend buying a double sided battle mat made of mousepad material. These are good mats in the US/Canada and these are good in the EU. As for your large, line of sight blocking terrain, I recommend...building it yourself. Wyloch's Armory is an excellent place to start with crafting your own terrain.

    I hope this helps, and if you have more questions, please feel free to ask.
u/skittlekitteh · 2 pointsr/snakes

Here's u/ataraxia's classic link dump I found on a other post. Although the informstion is written for bps (most common snake people have trouble with it seems- mostly due to the humedity) but the suggestions could definitely help you for the humedity aspect needed for your boa.


You should definitely read it through.

i'm going to dump a bunch of helpful links on you. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Parnax · 2 pointsr/buildapcforme

The NVidia reference card for the 2070 Super has a good cooler and runs cool and quiet.

The Noctua LH-L12 you found is the right one. This cooler has been discontinued by Noctua and is out of stock worldwide. There was one in stock at Amazon.de a few days ago but now it's gone. If you did get one, you'd remove the top fan and mount a A12x15 fan in the case fan slot directly above it. Alternatively, you'd attach the A12x15 fan directly to the top of the cooler in place of the stock top fan. However, I'm not sure that the clips that came with the cooler would work on the slimmer fan.

It is strongly recommended to add a Noctua fan with size depending on the cooler used. It is OK to reuse the stock case fans to cool the graphics card. You could remove the case fan which comes installed over the motherboard and move it to the open case fan slot over the graphics card next to the fan already installed there.

The NVMe SSD selected uses MLC NAND and has 600 TBW endurance. MLC is superior to either QLC or TLC.

The power supply calculator shows that this build needs 414W of power, so 600W should be sufficient.

Please don't use liquid metal as thermal paste in a PC like this one you will be moving a lot. It stays liquid and conducts electricity. It could create a short and destroy electrical components if it leaks out. The Noctua cooler comes with good thermal paste. Kryonaut Thermal Grizzly is another good option. When applying thermal paste on the 3900X don't use the pea or X method. Be sure that the paste is evenly spread across the entire top of the chip. There are three chiplets in the 3900X and none of them are in the center.

The motherboard comes with a WiFi antenna. I'd use it to start and consider upgrading if needed.

With the change in currency, VAT and your discount I couldn't be sure that I got the budget right. Is it OK?

I'm glad to help. Let me know if you have any other questions.

u/Cadder-12 · 6 pointsr/ballpython

I highly recommend you read the below information. Guaranteed that you'll be completely redoing your set up after reading all of this.

Credit: u/_ataraxia

The first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. Read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry, due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. Wood enclosures can also be suitable, if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. I'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.

    If you set up a good enclosure, and the temperatures and humidity are correct with no special treatment, the most work you need to do is feed every 1-2 weeks, spot clean the substrate and clean the water dish as needed [once or twice a week], and do a full enclosure cleaning every 1-6 months.
u/Gumblob · 6 pointsr/3Dprinting

Hi people, longtime lurker first-time commenter!

(Incoming wall of text. Just trying to be thorough!)

​

I'm looking to buy a new dual extrusion 3D printer; specifically one that can support soluble support materials such as HIPS or PVA. High layer resolutions are preferred (~<0.1mm) but are not absolutely necessary.

  • Budget: $1000 max; prefer staying within the $300-800 range. Amazon strongly preferred but printers sold directly from the manufacturer are okay as well.
  • Location: US
  • Pre-builts or kits are both fine. I work for my college's 3D printing lab so technical maintenance is not an issue. Although I would prefer not having to go through extensive modifications on the printer (i.e. printing new spool holders or installing a glass plate is fine, but replacing the motherboard and installing 10 new cooling fans is not).
  • The printer is for personal use. I currently own the MP Select Mini v2 and love the high detail it provides. However, a lot of parts I'm interested in printing/designing are unprintable w/o the aforementioned support material or resin-based machinery.
  • SLA/DLP/Polyjet 3D printing is not an option unfortunately. Spacing, high ventilation, and waste removal restrictions prevent me from jumping onto that fun wagon for now.
  • The printer must be Cura/Simplify3D/Slic3r compatible (basically no proprietary only software; gcode is the go to).

    I've currently looked into several newer printers but can't figure out which one is likely the most reliable:

  1. BIBO Dual Extruder and Laser Engraver - $829: I don't recognize this company and I'm still not sure why there's a laser engraver in the device but I won't complain (although this does raise some flags regarding safety). It seems to check all the boxes with dual extrusion, open-source slicers, 0.05mm layer res, etc., but it is a bit pricey and uses firmware I have yet to see on a 3D printer before (if anyone can elaborate on the firmware's reliability or whether it could be flashed w/ Marlin please do!).
  2. Flashforge Dreamer - $799: Fully enclosed and working right out of the box is nice, but I know Flashforge really likes to push their Flashprint software (although reviewers state it is Simplify3D compatible so let me know if other open-source slicers work!). Product description states it can only print from 0.1-0.2mm, however.
  3. Monoprice Dual Extruder (Fully Enclosed) - $799: I am partial to the Monoprice brand simply because all my experience with their devices were always excellent. This printer comes with some nice additions such as Auto-Resume features and print monitoring. However it pretty much requires separate spool holders (unless you buy small 200g spools from their website) and recommends its proprietary slicing software. Whether or not this device supports Cura is not confirmed in what few reviews exist for this machine.
  4. FlashForge Creator Pro - $670: Another Flashforge machine which has all the same quirks as the Dreamer albeit for a slightly older model at a cheaper price. Uses buttons instead of a touch screen which is just a minor gripe. May have wiring issues according to some negative reviewers which is a big safety concern if true. Supports Simplify3D according to the product description but has no mention of Cura which makes this an iffy buy for me.
  5. QIDI TECH X-Pro - $699: A company I haven't heard much about but I know they make budgety 3D printers (relatively speaking). High layer resolution like the BIBO and has Cura support (although it provides a modified version of it with a lot of options disabled according to reviewers). Firmware is also iffy and the printer may not have the highest build quality making this likely a no-go.

    These are pretty much all the printers I have found. Devices that merge two filaments into a single extruder are unpreferred as they are pretty iffy when printing with two different types of materials and need to create purge blocks really increases print time. Right now I'm learning towards the BIBO but would like to hear more about the device.

    If anyone has any other recommendations or additional experience with dual extruder 3D printers let me know!

    ​

    (P.S. I accidentally turned this comment into a wall of text as there was only so much information I could find on reliable, (relatively) affordable dual extrusion 3D printing. Maybe some would be willing to collaborate to make a post covering more info so others don't have to look so far!)
u/royalchameleon · 2 pointsr/3Dprinting

SAFETY GLASSES. Depending on how youre removing support material, those tiny peices of plastic can go flying, and I've ended up being saved by my blinking reflex more than once. Just get a cheap pair and use them. Support material will go flying towards your eyes, its not a safety cliche.

Everyone says to use a heat gun to clean up stringing(which can still occur even with near-perfect retraction settings, its just the nature of plastic.), but i prefer a butane pocket torch. Just quickly flicking the switch will vaporize the strings, without waiting for a loud heat gun to heat up, potentially warp your parts if theyre thin, and set it down to cool. Just dont hold a flame to your parts, they will ignite. A very brief(fraction of a second) flame works perfectly. If youre just using your printer for functional parts right now, dont worry about this.

A pair of curved tweezers for picking plastic off of the nozzle before/during(if youre OCD)/after a print (depending on how your cooler is setup). Side note- if your nozzle is really dirty, heat it up to ~200c and brush it with a wet qtip. Works great without scraping the nozzle with a wire brush.

X-acto blades #17 and #11. #17 is great for removing support material. Just please make sure youre not pushing the blade in the direction of your hand/leg/chest/eye/other body part.

As far as finishing prints- I've only used sandpaper, but a resin like xtc-3d is also popular.

Calipers. Get a nice pair of calipers.

As far as modding your printer.... https://www.trimcraftaviationrc.com/ has all the nuts & bolts you might need for great prices.

As far as software goes, I used to use simplify3d but after switching to slic3r prusa edition i think its amazing. Join https://www.facebook.com/groups/prusacommunity/ and get chris warcocki's pretty PLA profiles for slic3r. Really great facebook group, they'll keep you updated on all the latest mk3 improvements/news

Oh, and get some isopropyl alcohol, at least 90%. Wipe down the bed with it after every single print. Occasionally wipe with acetone, but not too often.

As far as filament goes, everyone has different recommendations. Avoid makergeeks. Great filament, horrible company. Atomic is great, but $30/kg which is a bit much for daily PLA, especially if its just going to be used for light brackets or whatever. I've been trying lots of manufacturers and i just ordered some makeshaper, i'll update in a few days if its lives up to the expectations.


Youre going to love your mk3.

u/ryios · 3 pointsr/ATV

Not an expert, but

I'd focus on the drive train issues first, get all those tires working, might be a lost cause before going any deeper, but others will have to help with that, I take that kind of stuff to my mechanic.

Brake pedal could be that it's low on brake fluid, or one of the brake calipers is stuck.

My quad has a foot brake like that and a hand brake, but the foot brake only brakes 1 tire. That tire has two brake calipers on it's roter, one to the foot break and one to the hand brake. So the hand brake is all 4 wheels, and the foot brake is 1 wheel. There is a master cylinder on my hand brake and another on my right rear tire (foot brake). If my foot brakes master cylinder runs low or springs a leak, my pedal goes through the floor like in your pic but I'll still have brakes on the hand brake. It's like a double/emergency braking system. If my hand brake goes out I can down shift (engine brake) and lay on that foot brake to brake and not hit a tree...
___

Fuel wise, it's likely carburetor being old. The carburetor should have a primer on it that injects gas into the carb when you press/pull it. Those generally have a diaphragm in them (rubber) that tends to go bad over time and cause a fuel leak.

If you can find a diagram of the carburetor that would help emensely.

Really though, you should take the whole carburetor off, take it apart and give it a bath in carb cleaner (no plastic/rubber in there) and clean all the jets out.

Also, they make rebuild kits for most carb's that come with all new jets, and pilot screw etc. See if you can find one. I typically just replace them all, easier and then I have spares.

Also, inspect the carb's vent hose and make sure it's intact and not clogged. Check the fuel line too, for damage/rot.

You should also remove the gas tank and clean it out. Take the petcock off and inspect the filters and valve, then clean the whole gas tank out so there's no dirt/bad gas in there.

Then check/change the spark plug(s). Before running it though, I'd check the valve clearance on the valves, guides on that online.

Once all that's done, it should run good and not leak gas.

Then you can address your other issues.

Pending how old it is, there are some parts I might replace just because:

  • Voltage Regulator
  • Starter Solenoid
  • Starter

    If the current ones are working, call them spares.

    Starters and solenoids are cheap, voltage regulators OEM are expensive, but you can buy a few after markets pretty cheap to have spares.

    Tool wise, I can recommend at least the following:

  • Wire/Brushes
  • Jack/Lift
  • Compression Tester
  • [Feeler Guages] (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BYGIR4) You want these to go from at least .002 to .014 inches
  • [Caliper] (https://www.amazon.com/Neiko-01407A-Electronic-Digital-Caliper/dp/B000GSLKIW/) If you need to measure float height, you want to be accurate.
  • Angle Finder Useful for float height, as most carbs need to be held at a specific angle for accurate float height adjustment.

    Then your typical ratchet sets, air tools, impact guns, etc.

    And socket extensions (long ones) because getting to some things is a royal pita.
u/beefjeeef · 9 pointsr/snakes


First of all. It's very good you recognize that you need help in learning how to care for the snake.

Second, here is a big link dump created by another regular user u/_ataraxia all credit for this goes to her.

the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Vaporhead · 8 pointsr/snakes

u/ataraxia has amazing information for ball pythons. You should definitely read it through. Glass tanks are not ideal for Bps, so this should help. Here is her normal dump of information I took from another post.

i'm going to dump a bunch of helpful links on you. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/dildoodlid · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

Welcome to homebrewing!

For that stout you probably want to be around 67, but your beer is fine, don't worry! Higher temperatures can impart off flavors, but at the temperatures you are at, your beer should taste just fine. I use this attached to a wine fridge or chest freezer, and it works wonders for keeping your fermentation temperature consistent (plus you can make lagers).

Cold crashing improves clarity, which is not a big concern for a stout so i wouldn't worry about it for now, it is totally not necessary.

Both of those beers would be good, and there is nothing wrong with extract brewing/kits, don't let anyone tell you different! That being said, i switched to biab (all grain) and have enjoyed it more and gotten better beers.

Lastly, as you get deeper into brewing water will become more of a concern, but for now don't worry too much about it. Grocery store water has two problems. First, you don't know whats in it, though some water companies like crystal geiser post the info online. 2. If it is distilled/reverse osmosis/filtered it will not have much of any minerals which you might want in your beer. Calcium, for example, is important for great beer, though you can add gypsum salt to your water to give it the calcium content you might want.

cheers and good luck with your new hobby, its very rewarding and a lot of fun. let me know if you have any questions and ill try to share my (limited) knowledge

u/OpticalNecessity · 5 pointsr/3Dprinting

I have a Maker select. It's my first and only 3D printer so my review compared to others is unreliable.

Here's a copy/paste of a review I did on it about a month ago. It's long but detailed with links:

I will give you my background before my opinions. As everyone has different goals, opinions, and experiences.

I got my printer near the end March of this year. I have something like 2500m of filament run though it, and no idea how much print time.

When I received my printer, my test prints failed and I was pissed. But this community helped improve my Cura settings and started producing usable parts. I then went nuts and printed out a BUNCH of mods. This is by far my most favorite thing. There's always something I can print to improve the quality of the prints.

THe down side is I went too far and got to a point where I couldn't produce anything of quality. So, 2 weeks of tweeking and researching later I'm printing in PETG with beautiful quality and very minimal visible layers.

My most recent project in PETG:
http://i.imgur.com/sVf7S2D.jpg?1

So, now to answer your question...

> How do you like your Maker Select?

I love it. It allowed me to buy a cheaper printer (One of the cheapest at the time @ $350) that produced amazing results. It also has upgrades you can purchase or print to improve the quality, so investing smaller amounts over time to make it better and better. I highly recommend it to anyone who is starting because it does require tweaking which forces you to learn and understand how exactly 3d printers work. A major plus was that this community has a lot of Maker Select users for support, which was a MAJOR plus for me.


As of today, I've purchased the following upgrades:

  • IKEA enclosure - $115
  • LEDs for Inside enclosure - $25
  • MK-9/10 Extruder Gear - $9
  • Micro Swiss All Metal hot End - $50
  • Micro Swiss Lever - $18 (Totally not necessary, but Micro Swiss's support was AMAZING to deal with, and I wanted to support them so I purchased this as well.
  • Misc. M3 and M4 Screws, etc. - ~$25 in total between Amazon Orders and Lowe's for things needed for mods.
  • New 40mm fan because I broke the blade on the one I had. There are cheaper ones than this. - $14
  • 50mm blower fan - $8

    So, in the last ~3 months I've spent an additional $264... Oh god, don't tell my wife! All are totally not necessary, mind you. The only thing I'd 100% recommend you do are print out the following to mods:

    DiiiCooler along with buying the 50mm blower fan. There are cheaper options out there, I just wanted it faster so I bought it through Amazon to get free 2 day shipping.

    z-Brace - This is key, and will run you maybe $15 worst case scenario to get enough M4 screws and the threaded rods.

    Edit: Forgot a couple more things I bought.

  • Lowe's glass - $4 for 2 pieces of 7.9"x7.9" glass
  • Borosilicate Glass - $12 - Amazing adheasing with PLA and ABS. Don't use it right now, though because I'm printing in PETG and I read on here that PETG eats borosilicate glass.
  • Lithium Grease - $7. When I changed my bearing blocks, I had issues with sticking so I purchased some of this to help smoothing out the bearing movement on the polished rods.
  • 3D print removal tool - $5. Printer comes with a larger scraper, but I needed something a bit more fine (thin) and this thing is perfect.
  • Spare bearings - $13 because I broke one of them when swapping to 3d Printed bearing blocks.
  • Digital Calipers - $18

    That's another $59, so $323... I have a problem. again, 95% of this is NOT NECESSARY. I'm just addicted to modding.

u/rollapoid · 3 pointsr/ballpython

Reposting the famous u/ _ataraxia info:

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Keifru · 13 pointsr/Sneks

Sounds like you were getting outdated or flat-out incorrect information and those 'experienced snake owners' are likewise misinformed. There are very few snakes that legitimately have evolved to thrive on sand-based substrate (irony being the Sand Boa is not one of them; they live in sandy soil which is very different composition than straight sand). The Ball Python is native to the svannah/jungles of Sub-Saharan Africa. Its dirt, soil, and burrows. Not a majority or even significant amount of sand.

Additionally, if I extrapolate correctly from this singular picture, your BP is also in a glass enclosure and has a log-style hide. The former makes keeping humidity in the 55~80% range a difficult exercise, and the latter, is a stressor as BPs do best with a hide that has a single-entrance or is cave-like; the more points of contact, the better, and a single entrance means they can feel safer.

I'm going to steal _ataraxia's ball python dump and toss it below:

i'm going to dump a bunch of links to get you on the right track. the first three links are detailed care sheets, the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/paingawd · 2 pointsr/electronic_cigarette

I started mixing back in January, and here's the list of the items I got off of Amazon to get set up:

  • Scale

  • Vegetable Glycerin(VG) Originally I just bought the quart size, but wound up needing a gallon fairly quick. If you're mixing at any ratio of 70VG/30PG or higher you will too.

  • Propylene Glycol(PG) I'm still on my first quart, and I've mixed a LOT of juice! I'll probably need another here in the next few months, but until then I really don't have the space to store a gallon of PG.

  • Pipettes Great for adding nicotine to your mixes and for those flavors that don't come in bottles with droppers.

  • Small Mixer This little beauty works great for mixing directly in the bottle. Sure, shaking your mixes is fine, but when you're doing multiple 50 ml or 120 ml bottles, shit gets old REAL quick. The plastic wand is the secret. It's got a split down the middle which allows the two halves to spread when it gets up to speed. All I need to fully mix is 15-30 seconds of this at full speed and the bottle is well homogenized.

    There's a few incidentals, such as nitrile gloves, eye protection(You do NOT want nicotine in your eyes!) paper towels. Bottles! How could I forget bottles?!? Again, Amazon to the rescue-just head over to 510 Central's storefront They've got some of the best HDPE bottles on Amazon-Nice and squeezy but firm. If glass is more your thing, I'm sure there's a bunch of those on Amazon too.

    Here's a little tip I use: When mixing, put your VG and PG in some condiment-style bottles(I picked up a couple at a craft store in the candy making dept) When you're mixing in small bottles, it saves time and mess to pour from a squeeze bottle than a syringe. Syringes and VG don't work too well-It's like sucking snot up a straw.

    I'm also going to say head over to /r/DIY_eJuice and read up on mixing. There's a TON of great info in the sidebar-READ ALL OF IT. When you get ready to start mixing, pick 2 or 3 recipes that sound good and buy the flavors for those. It's a lot easier and less expensive than buying a slew of flavors that sound great but don't play well with others. Enjoy!
u/FlyingPotatoCubed · 1 pointr/RandomActsOfGaming

Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes.

Well, how serious are you? Cause if you're serious... here ya go

Otherwise, without knowing what you're into, it's a bit tough. Sushi Go! is an absolutely awesome card game - super easy to teach, pretty quick to play, but really fun for anyone. It's... "THE BOMB" at parties.

I would also extremely recommend Dominion, it's probably my favorite table-top game. However, I can't say it's for everyone.

I would absolutely love KTANE... wish I could buy it, but I've already spent way too much on games, and college is eating into my pockets. Thanks much! Sir Soaring Spud

u/Jhubbz86 · 2 pointsr/buildapcsales

I love them. Bought one new from Newegg on sale for $350 and one from Acer recertified for $280 (which is exactly what this thread is of). They're super smooth if you've got a good AMD card. Even a strong Nvidia card will look great, but won't be able to utilize the freesync like an AMD card could. I've used this copy/pasta in other posts about this monitor, so here it is again.

 

I used this guy's Amazon tutorial on how to put the adapter on, although I got the non-quick set version that comes in seperate tubes.

These are the items I purchased:

  • VESA adapter, almost twice as strong as the quick-set.

  • This exact JB Weld, although I got mine from the local Lowe's.

  • Monitor Mount, I went single mount over double, so I could have more freedom of placement.

    Here are the pics of my setup. Please note, I waited a full 24 hours before mounting them. I know people get antsy, but just wait!!! Also, when adjusting the monitors for the first time, don't use too much torque, or you might detach the adapter from the monitor. The scratch marks you see on the back of the monitor, next to the adapter are where I sanded it down. I don't care about the way it looks, since my desk is against a wall. You can probably be a bit more careful if you actually care about the looks. I also sanded off the paint from the adapters so I can get good contact between the rough plastic surface and the bare steel plate. The screws that came with the adapters, as long as I washered them out a little, were perfectly fine to use.

    There are still some small adjustments I need to make to the way they are lined up, but this is pretty much 99% done. I highly recommend anyone looking for more desk space to give this a shot.
u/goatnapper · 3 pointsr/DIY_eJuice

First, watch this, then come back: How to make your own E-Liquid : Mixing by Weight - DIY Tutorial I hate youtube tutorials, and I still recommend this, so seriously, watch it.

Now, a warning. You can spend a tiny amount to start DIY, or you can just take the plunge and spend a good chunk, but be set for a while and the cost per ml drops even more.

So you'll need supplies. Other than nicotine and flavorings, Amazon works pretty well.

  • Pipettes For adding nicotine, everything else we'll put in squeeze bottles.
  • Scale
  • VG
  • PG

    I put my PG and VG into some squeeze bottles I found at wal-mart for $0.97. Makes dispensing them super easy (just like in the video). You can also find them on Amazon for slightly more, but Walmart is on the way to work, so I just stopped there.

    I put my flavors into dripper bottles, which I got from Heartland Vapes, but that only works if you want 100+. Free shipping is at $75, so I also threw flavors into my orders, since I'd need them anyway. Personally, I started with single flavor juices that I knew I'd like. I ordered a lot from MtBakerVapor, and most of their flavors are just single flavor FlavorWest (FW) stuff, so I grabbed them. I made those for a month, then I started buying more flavors (like my favorite, TFA Chai). Now I'm adding more flavors into my juices, judging on what I think would work well (it doesn't always). Start simple, then build on what you learn.

    Buy some nicotine from your preferred vendor, if you want nicotine in your juice.

    Then wait impatiently while USPS loses your package in San Diego, CA, during which you can download the calculator and experiment with it. The bottom calculator on the side bar is amazing. Now you're going, "Crap, I gotta weigh my liquids!". Well, not really. You can take the specific gravities off the manufacturer data sheets (sometimes there, sometimes right, don't trust the ones from FW), google them, or ask here and someone probably has them. Or, you can use the built-in weights for PG and VG, and then set your flavors to 1ml = 1g. It's close enough.

    Most of all, remember to have fun.

    Quick tip: Better not enough flavor than too much. Too much flavoring mutes the flavor, not enhances, and spearmint burns your lips when you add too much. You can always add more, you can't take away.
u/hvgwib · 1 pointr/ebikes

The only way I clean my chain is taking it off entirely and putting it into https://www.amazon.com/Magnasonic-Professional-Ultrasonic-Cleaning-Eyeglasses/dp/B00HZVYAVM/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&qid=1466917068&sr=8-3&captcha_verified=1&&linkCode=ll1&tag=zvnfhlebcd-20&linkId=79dfc5fc5c178effaf6c8cc181f80787 one of these with whatever cleaner you like, I've used a citrus degrease and simple green, both seemed great. Nothing has done as good of a job.

Once clean and dry, I drop the chain https://www.amazon.com/Finish-Line-Teflon-Bicycle-Chain/dp/B001C65JTI/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&dpID=41o1%2B61WiNL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL320_SR228%2C320_&refRID=K1R5QAN4QBMDASZA7E1S&linkCode=ll1&tag=zvnfhlebcd-20&linkId=234fed43a001a1ff9268cc524ceea17e into this and shake the chain around with the lid on tight. I then hang the chain over the container with the ends of the chain just over the opening of the bottle, a funnel can help here but I never needed it.

Chains come out super clean, extremely well lubricated, and I absolutely love this lube. The only thing I've liked better is paraffin wax in certain respects but much sooner reapplication is needed which can be annoying.

You can fit cassettes in these ultrasonic cleaners as well, does a great job.

u/aikouka · 1 pointr/Vive

It's a hard choice, but I can say that when I was looking at potential units, I did consider the QIDI TECHNOLOGY 3DP-QDA16-01. This is still priced around entry level, so I wouldn't expect it to be a ton better; however, it does have some advantages. One nice thing is that it has a dual extruder setup. Initially, you might think "Why is printing in two colors a big deal?", but the advantage isn't colors but rather material. There's a specific type of filament that is water soluble, which works well for supports. This allows you to remove supports far easier than snipping them and filing down the nubs. It's not always a hard thing, but doing this for delicate parts can be a bit unnerving!

One thing to also consider when it comes to the world of 3D printing is how is the third-party support. That's where rebadges actually work out pretty well as these common designs usually mean more third-party components or even 3D printed parts available. For example, the Monoprice Maker Select V2 that I use is really just a Wanhao Duplicator i3. If I find parts for the Duplicator i3, they're likely going to work with the Select V2 as well. That QIDI unit earlier is the same as the FlashForge 3D Printer Creator Pro, and both of them are actually just rebadges of the Wanhao Duplicator 4! (Wanhao makes quite a lot of 3D printing products.)

One negative thing about that unit is that it's cantilevered. It isn't necessarily a problem, but it does mean that the weight of the carriage plate and hot plate are being carried only on a single side. Being cantilevered is normally only an issue when you start going up in build size, but it's worth noting.

I'd say the most important thing is to make sure the unit does everything that you need. It's not the worst thing if you go with a smaller, cheaper unit just to get your feet wet, and maybe work up to a larger, more capable unit.

u/qwicksilfer · 2 pointsr/AskReddit

Oh god. Okay. I feel like I've been preparing for this post my whole life (or at least since I found these awesome things on amazon):

u/thefourthdr · 6 pointsr/electronic_cigarette

Tips.

  1. I don't recommend a kit, but that's just me.
  2. Mix by weight. Buy this scale https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-LB-501-Digital/dp/B005UGBG20/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1474497797&sr=8-3&keywords=Digital+scale&refinements=p_89%3ADigital+Scale%7CAmerican+Weigh+Scales. The 500g one, not the others. You want 0.01g precision.
  3. Don't buy random flavors. Pick one or two juices over at http://e-liquid-recipes.com that sound good to you and have a good rating. Buy the flavors to make those.
  4. Buy your VG and PG here. https://www.amazon.com/Glycerin-Vegetable-Kosher-USP-Quart/dp/B004C7MTLA/ref=sr_1_2_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1474497923&sr=8-2&keywords=vegetable+glycerine and https://www.amazon.com/Essential-Depot-Propylene-Glycol-Quart/dp/B005F5OJG6/ref=pd_sim_121_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=D735R4MZTM0WJN6VZ840
  5. Get some pipettes. Plastic Transfer Pipettes 1ml, Graduated, Pack of 500 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005CD2I50/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_77W4xb3TT4MQX
  6. Get good nicotine. I like Carolina Xtracts and Nude Nicotine
  7. Read everthing here. https://www.reddit.com/r/DIY_eJuice/wiki/diy_beginners_guide
  8. Read the everything here. https://www.reddit.com/r/DIY_eJuice/comments/3lu9gx/nicotine_need_to_know_all_your_questions_answered/
  9. Read eveything here. https://www.reddit.com/r/DIY_eJuice/wiki/verified_vendors
  10. Watch this. https://youtu.be/EMEY5L46b18
  11. Wear protective gloves if you buy high percentage nicotine solution!
  12. Enjoy your freedom. You're right, it is fun to do. And easy. My wife calls it vaking :)
u/mattzm · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

If he's an extract brewer, upgrading to an all-grain setup would be fun. Mash tuns, ported brewing kettles with temperature gauges and sight glasses, a nice gas burner or an all in one BIAB setup like the Unibrau or Wort Hog (especially if you have 240V power available, though 120v options are available). The latter two hit just around $1000 themselves but are ready to go out of the box.

If he's already an all-grain brewer in either multi-vessel or BIAB (or even if he's not), does he have a kegging setup? A good size chest freezer (consult the chart here for model numbers that fit the right number of kegs), a 4 pack of kegs with connectors, a gas manifold, a CO2 cylinder, and an Inkbird temperature controller will fall neatly within the budget range and is a significant "luxury" upgrade to buy all at once.

Already got that? He's probably already got fermentation temperature control if so, but if not, it's a nice one. This option tends to be the most awkward to just buy off the shelf and the temperature controlled conical fermenter I'm seeing runs around $1800, so its a bit out of budget. Again, a fridge or freezer with temperature controller are nice. I'd advise against a conical unless you know it will fit into his fermentation chamber. They are super sweet but they require a setup built with them in mind.

Already got all that? Ok, we're into the hilarious luxury items now. A reverse osmosis water setup? A high end pH meter? A giant stainless steel sink in his brewing area with one of those nifty shower head things for easy water filling and cleaning? A barrel of some kind for ageing? Can't help you past here, I'm too poor!

u/AGentlemanWalrus · 2 pointsr/pcmasterrace

ALRIGHT! Sorry for just getting back to you I've been trying to reply and mobile and kept accidentally deleting what i typed while trying to format my response. So had to move to the Laptop.

Anyways when I say you should repaste I'm referring to the action of removing the heatsink from the CPU and GPU clearing the provided "thermal paste/grease" (thermal paste or grease depending to who you talk to is a thermally conductive paste that is meant to be between the CPU/GPU and the heatsink to fill the airgap and conduct heat to the sink better.) from both and applying new paste. Here is also a video guide on how to apply thermal paste it doesn't pertain specifically to your laptop but gives you a good idea on how its done.

Now when it comes to your device I took the liberty of looking up the service manual and found a video guide on how to disassemble down the the motherboard here. If you've never done anything like this before it can be a little daunting, but if you have a friend with some experience it shouldn't be more than a few hours project and the outcome should be considerably better than before.

If you are going to go this route there are a few thermal pastes that everyone recommends and everyone has their own opinions but as I stated before any of these will be better than what you originally had so buy whatever fits your budget.

Artic Silver 5

IC-Diamond

Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut

Prolimatech PK-3

There are plenty of others but any of these will do you good, with a major recommendation to the Silver 5 due to bang for the buck.

After all that and you decide that maybe you don't want to do a repaste (and even if you did repaste I'm still recommending this) you are going to want to get a laptop cooling pad. The reason is due to the nature of laptops and how compact they are sometimes depending on the surface they are laid on they do not get enough air to cool properly, dropping your performance into the shitter. I have a similarly spec'd laptop to yours (Lenovo Y50 4700hq and 860m) and I use the Notepal XSlim its not the best but it does the job and for $18 I can't complain. There are others but buy what feels right to you.

Sorry for the long winded post I hope this helps you some, and I hope you can get your laptop performance back as you have a more than capable laptop. Let me know if you need anything else!

u/kablaq · 1 pointr/Warhammer

For airbrushes, I'm personally a fan of the Neo by Iwata, especially their gravity feed (cup) model. The brush is well built, fairly easy to take apart and clean, and has very few issues with most paints and other products you may put through it.

I picked mine up on sale for around $50, and if you have a Michael's or Hobby Lobby nearby, you may be able to pick it for less with one of their one-item coupons they release occasionally. It's also nice if you have a hobby store near by as you can drop in a pick up replacement needles or nibs if you accidentally drop it >.>; . Needles and nibs typically cost in the 10-15 dollar range for replacements, so not too terrible.

For compressors, a simple compressor with a tank will work wonderfully, so long as it has a proper pressure regulator and water trap. I have this compressor and it works well, after I got the correct airbrush hose to attach to the NEO.

There are a couple extra tools that can help with airbrushing as well, but most can be picked up at a later point. Something I would recommend that you get with the initial purchase is a spray booth. This allows you a place to spray into and capture many of the errant particles of paint from your airbrush. Combined with a proper respirator mask, it will ensure that you don't breath in any of the particulate from airbrushing, and hopefully don't have airbrush paints drying on items they weren't directly sprayed on. I would say of the two, the mask is the most important to have.

A quick-disconnect is useful for cleaning and swapping airbrushes, but isn't really necessary at first. A cleaning pot is also useful as it gives you a dedicated space to spray out leftover paint and cleaing fluid, and should stay fairly contained.

I would also look at purchasing a ultrasonic cleaner further on, as it is amazingly helpful for cleaning the airbrush when paint has leaked into the body, or spilled into places it shouldn't be.

Other's can probably offer advice as well, but that's what I currently use. Hope this helps!

u/iKrunk · 2 pointsr/electronic_cigarette

I have been getting my PG and VG from Amazon. Its cheap and if you have prime it gets there super fast.

I use the essential depot VG, and PG. I get them quarts at a time for like 11-13 bucks apiece and that shit lasts a long time. You will go through more VG than PG usually.

I used to get my nicotine from wizard labs but I recently started using nude nicotine, I recommend it. In the DIY sub youll see a shit ton of vendors and a bunch of brands people swear by. Thats the part that can be overwhelming.

you can get bottles so many fucking places, if you just want a few amazon will do you right, wizard labs has em. Lately I have been just getting them from fasttech cause they are decent bottles (plastic) and they are cheap as fuck. when searching for bottles a good tip to have is 1/2oz bottles are 15mls and 1oz bottles are 30mls,

https://www.onestopdiyshop.com/ is a pretty awesome place.
http://wholesale.heartlandvapes.com/ is nice too.

For just starting you dont need much, PG, VG, NIc, Bottles, Flavors, Get a couple of 1ml and 3ml Syringes, and some 14g needle tips for VG based shit, and 18G tips for PG based shit.

My mixes are mostly VG, so I get my nicotine in VG Carrier base. I think I have pretty much covered most beginner info. I hope you decide to check it out its pretty rewarding and fucking fun.

Come hang out, Lurk about or whatever


I forgot you will also want to use a ejuice calculator, I use the POTV ejuice calculator on my phone it works well and its free. Its in the Android and iOs store. Peace!

u/trevthepally · 11 pointsr/cornsnakes

You're going to want to pick up something like this. You set a temperature and an acceptable threshold (i have mine varying by only one degree), and it will automatically turn the heat lamp off and on to keep it at a consistant temperature.

I also have a under-tank heat mat for my hot side, which is the main thing used to warm my snake. I absolutely recommend getting one to put under your tank. Corns like to burrow and will get more benefit to having one on the hot side. I just use the heat lamp to keep the ambient air in the tank at an acceptable level. You will want to get a separate controller for the heat mat.

Edit: I also have an Indoor/Outdoor Thermometer just chilling in the tank to get a more accurate reading inside. Your tank atmosphere is going to usually be a bit different than the atmosphere in your room. I have the "inside" number reading the ambient temp of the tank, the "outside" number reading the inside of the under-tank mat (controller probe goes between mat and glass on the outside, and this prob sticks to the glass on the inside under the substrate), and it also tells me the humidity in the tank.

You want to keep your numbers as consistant as possible. I like to shoot for 85 degrees on the hot side, 75 degrees on the cool side, and between 40%-60% humidty. I hope this information helps. Let me know if you have any questions.

Edit 2: GoHerping does a great care guide video on YouTube, which is where I got most of my setup and care info from. There is also a link to their discord on the YouTube page that is full of friendly people that can answer a lot of your questions.

Edit 3: You're going to be better off using a Ceramic Heat Emitter instead of a bulb. It just produces heat and no light, which will be better with the controller ( you don't want the light isn't constantly turning off and on). Corns don't need UVB either, and do fine with just natural lighting (assuming the light in the room still follows the normal day/night cycle).

u/beenyweenies · 1 pointr/computergraphics

As the others said, stick to Maya or 3ds max. Learning C4D once you know other packages is pretty easy, but for employment you really want one of the Autodesk packages.

Also, I've found the best way to learn to do 3D modeling is to do it as often as possible. No substitute for hours spent trying and failing. Almost everything you model has unique needs and requirements, so watching tutorials can only help so much. You need to just get in there and start creating, hit a wall on how some part of it should be made, then go research the best technique. A good example is how best to drill holes in surfaces, many people trip up on this.

I would recommend you start by choosing simple real-world objects and model them, whether they are things in your room or products, etc. Go on Amazon and buy a pair of calipers (such as these) and use them to take measurements of real world objects as you model them. This will help you get everything proportionally correct, AND make the job easier. Guessing proportions is a good way to make everything look off.

u/Ellistann · 5 pointsr/woodworking

This guys list is pretty much what I was going to say.

So for some recommendations:

I've restored an antique 1930s No 5. Bought it for 45, and it is best for those on a budget. Any pre WWII Stanley just needs some light restoration work and a reworking of the blade and it will do 20x better than a harbor freight plane and roughly same as modern Stanley sweethearts at 1/3 the cost. It may not be as good as woodriver or lie Nielsen, but it's a 1/4 or 1/6 the cost respectively.

Paul sellers recommends Aldi Chisels, I got Narex instead for an additional $20. I love them, and will only upgrade out of them once I get enough money to go for some veritas or lie Nielsen. I got a set of 4 with imperial measurements for $60ish. I'd put any extra money into sharpening systems than upgrading them.

I bought David Barron dovetail guides and the Japanese pull saws he reccomends. Gyokucho 372 Razor Saw Dotsuki Takebiki Saw. Look at Amazon for the narex chisels I reccomend and the 'people who bought this also bought' section and you'll find it easily. While there you can find some leather for stropping and the green compound you need with it. Also while looking at these, you'll see a reccomendations for the Stanley disposable knife and the replacement blades. This is what Paul sellers recommends, and it works well. Stays ridiculously sharp, and can be rehoned with little effort and the blade cheaply replaced once it becomes to much work top get the thing sharp. Cutting layout lines is much more precise and helps prevent tearout. I bought narex marking knife and love it. I don't mind trying to hone it every so often. Ditto the scratch awl.

Basically took around the Amazon other bought recommendations and you'll find a bunch of fairly cheap quality things to get you up and running.

u/nickwc92 · 1 pointr/askwomenadvice

I've worked for a retail jeweler for years in the past. Just walk into a jeweler and ask them to clean it, they will clean it free. When I was working there our main idea to keep people in the store to try and sell something was to offer to clean all the jewelry they had on and while they sit in the machine cleaning we would offer our help. But you dont have to be helped if you just want it cleaned.

Get on Amazon and buy some Gemoro cleaner. Or buy a machine, it shocks all the dirt and crud off here is a cheap one that will work, or give you an idea of what you want, if you want to do it at home. Just let it sit in machine for a minute to a couple mins depending on how dirty it is. But if you buy the machine please buy the cleaner chemicals to go with it so it will clean properly. You mix the chemicals with water based on the chemical brands instructions. Be sure to do some googling on what stones and metals can go into those machines. Stones like opal are precious, soft stones, that should not be placed in those machines. A lot of birthstones shouldnt be placed in those machines. They will discolor them and ruin them.

Edit: If its diamonds and real gold wear it whenever you want. The only thing that will degrade is the gold. But you can "re-dip" the gold whenever it starts to degrade or discolor. White gold will become more "matte" or not as shiny. When it comes to that just spend 25-40 bucks on dipping it. Yellow gold will start to turn into a white gold color, so dip it then. With yellow gold there is silver metals mixed into it so that's why itll turn white-ish after a while.

I hope this helps you. I recommended the machine incase you dont want to be hassled in the jewelry store, they're ruthless because sales are low 98 percent of the year. I recommend going to a local jeweler because you're helping your local community jeweler stay in business and they wont bombard you like retail will, like with credit card applications and all the bs. Good luck and congratulations!

Edit 2: Also, if its gold and diamonds, dont be so tough on yourself. Just was your hands in public with the ring on. Dont risk loosing it or forgetting it because you hear people say it messes the ring up or whatever cause of soap. It really wont mess it up like that. Just take it off when you put on lotion, sunscreen, etc.

u/rooksjeff · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

Question One: Fridge Temperature Control
There are several different units available to adjust the temperature of your fridge. The Johnson Controls A419 will control only cold (or heat if rewired), but the Inkbird ITC-308 will control both cold and heat.

I’ve used both and the Inkbird better fit my needs and is less expensive by more than half. There are other options available as well. Google something like “temperature control unit homebrewing” and you have plenty to read. As for wiring your own, I’m sure it’s possible, but I have no expertise in doing so.

Question Two: Carbonation Pressure
There are many different ways to carbonate your beer and several different gas blends available. Oxygen is not a good choice, as it will cause your beer to oxidize quickly - this common tastes like wet cardboard smells.

I only use carbon dioxide (CO2), but I do draft line consulting for a bar that uses a “beer blend” of 80% CO2 and 20% nitrogen. I can’t taste a difference and it pours the same, but that gas blend costs a little more. There may be other reasons to choose a specific blend that I am unaware of.

As for carbonating your kegs, what you described sounds like burst carbonation. Brulosophy has a great write up on different carbonation methods. I normally use the Set It And Forget It method, but will use the Burst method if I’m in a rush.

Question Three: Infusions
Not sure if you mean infusing the beer with flavors in the keg or glass or if you mean adding fruits or other flavors during fermentation.

To infuse in the keg, I use a mess bag to keep the liquid diptube from clogging. To infuse in the glass you can use a coffee press or even a Randall The Enamel Animal.

As for adding things to fermentation, fruits, hops, oak, spices, and liquor all make good additions to the right beer. Google phrases like “beer infusion recipes, “adding fruit to fermentation,” and “keg dry hopping” for more information.

Happy home brewing and good luck. Kanpai.

u/Robathome · 1 pointr/3Dprinting

Sorry for the delayed response!

I appreciate the compliment, sometimes I still get the feeling like I'm over my head with this stuff, but I still want to help however I can. Qui docet discit, as they say...

OK, if your results are coming back that far off, I would take a big step back and start with the basics. From what you've told me, my first guess is that the steps/mm for your towers is off. In your case, I would throw the assumption that your towers are all moving the same right out the window for now, and check each tower independently:

  • Remove the effector and the delta arms completely.

  • Use G28 to home the empty carriages to Z_max.

  • Pick a tower and stick a piece of tape on the column in a way that you can use as a reference for the starting position of the carriage on that tower. Personally, I put the bottom of the tape in line with the centerline of the lowest wheel. Technically speaking, you can do this for all three towers at the same time, but imho that increases the chances for human error.

  • Use G91 to switch to relative positioning, and then G1 Z-100 to (attempt to) move the towers down 100mm.

  • Put another piece of tape on the tower using the same reference point as you did before, and measure the distance between the two. If you don't have digital calipers, stand up, find your way to a hardware store, and buy them. Now. There is no tool more important in your 3D printing arsenal than a set of quality digital calipers. but I digress... If the distance between your reference points is not exactly 100.00mm, adjust your steps/mm... The simplest formula is

    (Current steps/mm) x (Expected mm traveled) / (Actual mm traveled)

    If that doesn't work, or if your steps/mm is still off, it's probably still a firmware setting, so try the following one at a time:

  • If you're using a microstepping, cut it in half, or quarters if you'd like (don't forget to do the same thing to your tower's steps/mm!!!). Oh, and if you're using interpolation, don't.

  • Trim down your max acceleration setting, again by 50% or 25%, and lower your speed settings too.

  • Quadruple-check that your bed is 100% flat, and make sure the points on the bed being probed are completely clean. I use FSRs, which uses nozzle-contact with the bed as the trigger. This method only works if the hotend is at operating temperature, otherwise there's likely a hard glob of plastic stuck to the tip of the nozzle. However, running it at temp while probing means that a tiny bit of plastic is left behind after every probe. For longer than I'd like to admit, these little blobs started stacking up and interfering with the probe results, even though they were barely visible!

    Don't give up! Running a 3D printer is an exercise in patience, and I find it extremely gratifying when it works! Trust me, you'll start keeping backups of your config settings, it's a hard lesson that most operators don't need to experience twice.

    What you're in the middle of is exactly the kind of situation where "you have to know how to walk before you can run" applies, except in an extreme case like this, you have to learn to crawl first.

    I'll help in whatever way I can! If you'd like, put your config and config-override files on pastebin, and I'll take a look to see if anything stands out!
u/Renigami · 1 pointr/GetMotivated

To put things in perspective on the money saved.

  • That value in the image is ~$300 shy of what I actually spent on Steam's PC games. at 172 games with 1TB of total download content.

  • That value in the image is my Ivy Bridge Core i7 Gaming PC, with 32GB of RAM and two AMD 7970s (at the time of purchase about three years ago).

  • That value in the image is halfway there to buying this nice bike. A Honda Shadow that I feel is a great cruiser for the price (no that link isn't my own to pander, it is something I found as an example).

  • That value in the image is about what some 3D printers go for in cost at the base price. An example here

  • That value in the image is what many televisions go for in quality and capability, with extra for one's own gaming PC to hook up with keyboard and trackball periphery or gaming console to boot.

  • That value in the image is possibly a price of a cruise trip.

  • That value in the image is what the second highest end Surface Pro 3 configuration goes for and have change left over for accessories.

  • Not a fan of the Surface? The new 2015 Macbook runs of the cost of a laptop plus accessories with the money otherwise used for smoking. Fan of laptop gaming? That right there is the price of a good gaming laptop too.

  • That value in the image is what I spent on for the basics of my workshop (table saw, router, miter saw, sander, first drill press, cordless drill, and accompanying bits and blades).

  • That value in the image (depending on your motivation and intake of instruction) can be attributed to a good chunk of a private pilot's license.

    That app needs a personal settable achievement in terms of what one intends to do with the money saved.
u/baller43 · 3 pointsr/3Dprinting

Hi, Im new to owning a 3D printer but have done several different prints at my college.

  • I am currently studying computer engineering and am planning on printing stuff with micro-controllers, robotics, small electronic components, and maybe some RC projects. Anything related to that sort of stuff.
  • My budget is up to anything around $1000 ish. If i can save money tho then that would be a great perk.
  • I live in the USA
  • Im totally down to do a bit of assembling, especially if it involves saving a little $$$

    I have been doing a lot of researching my self on 3d printing technologies. One of the things Ive noted is dual extrusion vs single extrusion. Also Ive heard a glass bed is very important?

    Ive read that dual extrusion can be good for certain applications like printing a structure with two materials, one which is dissolvable . Ive also read that dual extruders can have a tendency to cause a print to fail as the material can cool down in the extruder not being used. This then can cause issues when that printer extruder is used again within the same print as the material on the end does not heat up again properly?

    Ive looked at several good bang for the buck printers(on paper)

  • Prusa i3 MK3(with multi material upgrade????) - Why is this printer mentioned...everywhere???? whats so good about it vs other printers?
  • Flash forge 3D printer creater pro
  • QIDI technology Xpro
  • BIBO 3D??

    Please give me as much info as possible. I really don't have any experience with using different printers at all, and am really open to some good internet education. So please comment away :)
u/kiwiandapple · 1 pointr/buildapcforme

Sorry for the late reply, got a bit busy last night and worked on this for a few hours.

I will explain my changes in detail in a reply to this post. Since I went over the 10.000 character limit reddit provides per post.

So I tried to get the black & orange vibe as best as possible, without overdoing it.
I've included custom cables, the price is a slight estimate. To get the best possible looks on them, I would recommend to go the extra mile and measure the cables their length and adjust accordingly. This will make your build pop the extra mile and just look super crisp. More details down below!

I'll also provide my standard list of videos that explain certain hardware terminologies & guides. As well as stress test software!

PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor | £599.94 @ AWD-IT
CPU Cooler | be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler | £72.38 @ Amazon UK
Thermal Paste | Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut | £6.15 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard | Asus ROG Strix X570-F Gaming ATX AM4 Motherboard | £257.89 @ Amazon UK
Memory | G.Skill Trident Z Royal 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory | £348.59 @ Amazon UK
Storage | Samsung 970 EVO Plus 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive | £410.42 @ Amazon UK
Storage | Seagate Barracuda Compute 4 TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive | £89.99 @ Amazon UK
Video Card | Asus GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB ROG Strix Gaming OC Video Card | £1265.41 @ Amazon UK
Case | be quiet! Silent Base 801 ATX Mid Tower Case | £129.99 @ Amazon UK
Power Supply | SeaSonic PRIME Ultra Platinum 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply | £187.76 @ Amazon UK
Custom Cables | 24pin ATX, 8+4pin EPS, 2x8pin PCIe | £101.80 @ Octix
Case Fan | Fractal Design AL-14 PWM 103.85 CFM 140 mm Fan | £29.32 @ Amazon UK
Monitor | Acer Predator X34P 34.0" 3440x1440 120 Hz Monitor | £899.99 @ Amazon UK
Monitor | Acer Predator X34P 34.0" 3440x1440 120 Hz Monitor | £899.99 @ Amazon UK
Monitor Arm | NB North Bayou Monitor TV Wall Mount Bracket | £29.90 @ Amazon UK
Cable Sleeve | Cable Management Sleeve – Rantizon 19.7" | £7.99 @ Amazon UK
Mousepad | Sidorenko Gaming Extended Mouse Mat - 900 x 400 mm | £10.99 @ Amazon UK
| NAS |
NAS | Synology DS918+ | £503.99 @ Amazon UK
Storage | Western Digital Red 8 TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive | £213.35 @ Amazon UK
Storage | Western Digital Red 8 TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive | £213.35 @ Amazon UK
| Total | £6355.64
| Generated by Kiwiandapple |

u/ZombieGrot · 2 pointsr/3Dprinting

The Flashforge Creator Pro and similar machines (they're all clones of the Replicator One dual) may do the trick. Nowadays they come with sides, front doors, and top covers so they're relatively cat safe. The Blessed Cat here recognizes the "filament loading" sound and desperately wants to catch that mysterious noodle thingie but so far she's had no luck.

They don't have so-called autoleveling, which is fine by me. The build platforms are stable enough that once you get the trick of leveling (AKA tramming) the bed to be flat with respect to the plane of the nozzle travel then it's usually good for a long time without needed to be tweaked.

They print PETG just fine, insofar as PETG ever prints "fine." It can be fussy but it's awesome when dialed in right. The bracket on the right, to replace the original swing arm lamp bracket, is done in PETG and is holding up great.

u/bwinter999 · 1 pointr/BuyItForLife

This is doable for much less than $600. When I started shaving w a SR I figured it would take about 2 years of shaving to pay off the initial cost. Although if I am being honest I probably spend more now on razors than I did before.

For the most basic of kits you will need a:

  • Razor Not really shave ready (used $40 or new $150-200)

  • Sharpening stones $100 (I use DMT, but you can also use japanese water stones. I like dmt because they are always flat and in my experience last longer. You probably need a fine/extra fine (600/1200 grit) and an extra extra fine (8000 grit))

  • Strop ($20 -amazon)

  • Strop compound ( a $5 bar of cromium oxide goes a long way)

  • Brush ($12-35 amazon)

  • Soap ($2-10 depending on what you want)

    That's the basics really. You can spend more on aftershave, preshave, synthetic brushes, creams whatever. If you know how to sharpen/strop I would definitely recommend a used razor off ebay ( a nice one you don't have to restore). If you don't know how to sharpen I recommend you get some stones and learn anyway it isn't very hard. Though you may want a cheap $10 razor to practice on just in case. The hardest part is choosing a brand (or buying just one razor). For used razors you have some things to consider:

  • Handle/scales - not broken, pins are ok

  • Blade- no rust, no chips, no excessive spine wear, no weird angles from sharpening, you can polish some imperfections out but not too many and you probably don't want to restore a razor before you learn to use one.

  • Brand- Wade/butcher are good. Dubl duck are good (but probably overpriced/hyped), E A Berg are good, Boker is good, CV Heljestrand- good those are all I have presently but basically anything made in sheffield, solingen, or eskilstuna should be ok to shave with after they are sharpened.

    You may also want to try a double edge (DE) razor but then you still need blades (although they are very very cheap) I am not sure if that is a requirement here or not.
u/OfficerPewPew · 1 pointr/300BLK

So this is a month old but I have some insight if you haven't already started a certain path.

I just bought a 300blk upper for my pistol. I have a lot of 223 brass I've saved to and decided to reload for 223 to save some money. Well I'm pretty well into reloading for 223 and decided i would start for 300blk as well. The equipment isn't too expensive (relatively) if you get some Cabela's sales and buy some discounted gift cards. Full equipment with necessary parts will run about $250 after everything (can be cheaper if you buy a bundle pack).

This kit

Digital caliper

Initial 300blk dies

Trimming die

Trimmer

Case lube

That's pretty much it for the equipment side. Then you'll need bullets, powders, and primers.

If you're starting out with 223 brass you may want to cut the case before trimming, but you'll need something to cut it with. If you buy some ammo to shoot and collect the casings you can't use them too.

I have everything I need for 300blk except powder pretty much. I just need to find something to use.

So $250 for equipment and 1k round of 223 reloading will cost me about $175. That's $425 for the first 1k round of just 223. Once I buy stuff for 308, 300blk, and 9mm I'll start saving in much higher quantities per round. I think I'll probably actually start saving money through reloading in a couple months if I shoot as regularly as I'd like. I still buy ammo on sales and all, so I typically don't count brass into my cost for a reloaded round. On average it's about $.18/round (for .223) if I don't find good deals.

Edit: so I just went through and did some calculating. .178cpr for 223, .285cpr for 300blk, and .362cpr for 308 of I get good sales and free shipping.

u/SheepeyDarkness · 1 pointr/3Dprinting

Budget: $300 Max ( $220 - $250 Preferred )
Country: USA
I would be willing to build it from a kit - It's no problem. I don't have much experience with electronic maintenance, but I'm good w/ making stuff and my dad has experience.
I plan to print things out for fun, maybe mini figures. I would like to print things out that are larger though.
No circumstances. I just prefer fast-ish shipping if possible. Also must be a cyber-monday sale. I found some deals that fit my budget and look nice and I don't know whether or not they're good or worth. I'll link them in the post. If you could find a better one or give me opinions as to which one is the best to buy that'd be appreciated.

https://www.gearbest.com/3d-printers-3d-printer-kits/pp_1841229.html?wid=1433363&lkid=17765773
https://www.gearbest.com/3d-printers-3d-printer-kits/pp_725101.html?wid=1433363&lkid=17749496
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/ANYCUBIC-Formax-3D-Printer-Large-Plus-Size-FDM-Impresora-4max-Diy-Kit-Modular-Design-Nozzle-3D/32852262715.html?spm=a2g01.12110341.layer-3te59f.543.3924dfaczlvX5Z&gps-id=5780592&scm=1007.19881.118560.0&scm_id=1007.19881.118560.0&scm-url=1007.19881.118560.0&pvid=e1ff7053-f1ef-45eb-b234-73ffb4b482a8
https://www.gearbest.com/3d-printers-3d-printer-kits/pp_009713679625.html?wid=1433363&lkid=17749753
https://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-Printer-Filament-Preloaded-Printable/dp/B018GZBC3Y/?tag=all3dp0c-20


u/TeeJS · 2 pointsr/CR10

OK - the 1st one lists itself as a CR-10 S5, which has a 500x600x500 build area. What is listed is the base CR-10 with a 300x300x400 build area. It's also NOT the "S" version which has lots of upgrades: mainly a filament sensor, a second motor for the z axis and has a Atmega 2560 instead of Atmega 1280 for the controller board.

The 2nd one lists itself as a base CR-10 and by all appearances seems to be one.

Seeing how a CR-10 sells for $499 on Amazon, this seems to be a good deal. You'd have to look at the eBay vendor's feedback to see if they are delivering what they advertise. It seems like the $400 price isn't out of the range of what they cost coming straight from China, but is on the low end so be careful.

Honestly, I'd strongly recommend getting the CR-10S as they upgrades, especially the board, are well worth it. They sell on Amazon for $599 https://www.amazon.com/HICTOP-Printer-Filament-Monitor-300x300x400mm/dp/B074QLQSQV and the Hictop is a solid build as far as CR10S go. You cold probably find a better deal on one from overseas.

If that price is too steep for you, and you are OK with a smaller bed size the Monoprice Select Mini is another good starter printer. For $220 you get a heck of a lot of printer: https://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-Select-Printer-Heated-Filament/dp/B01FL49VZE

u/MysteriousMere · 1 pointr/3Dprinting

I've had an Anet A6 (similar) for just over 2 years now, and (after a lot of tuning) I've been able to use it for applications that require a fair bit of dimensional accuracy. I have a RAMPS 1.4 setup with Skynet, a mosfet for the bed, and that's about it. As long as you take care of it, you should be able to get some pretty darn good prints out of it. I unfortunately don't have a picture of it, but a while ago I was able to make a nice looking desk ornament that looks sort of like this with no weird artifacts popping up or even support. So, you could feasibly use your A8 for making tabletop figurines.

However, I actually prefer printers that use extruded aluminum frames like the Tarantula, Ender 3, and HE3D IE3, since its really easy to print attachments for mods that fit nicely into the t-slots of the aluminum bars. You can even get an Ender 3 on Amazon for $230. I've never owned or used one before, but I've heard from many that they work pretty well even out of the box.

u/veive · 2 pointsr/3Dprinting

Honestly it depends on your free time, level of technical competency and how much of that free time you want to spend working on a 3D printer rather than printing with it.

A kit like a FolgierTech kossel will get you much larger print volume for the money. The down side is that getting a kit running can almost be a hobby in and of itself.

If you are comfortable soldering wires and PCB components, flashing firmware to an arduino and know enough C and/or C++ to make the occasional firmware tweak yourself a kit can be a great way to go.

The down side is that it can take hours to assemble and troubleshoot.

An off the shelf printer will have a much lower price to print area ratio, but will often come ready (or nearly ready) to print.

Also, another thing to consider is support- often with a kit you're pretty much on your own unless a part arrives missing or broken. Sometimes there is a forum or the manufacturer has an e-mail address you can contact but that's about it. Most prebuilt manufacturers actually do offer some kind of warranty where they can and will repair your printer if something goes wrong.

Something like the MP Select would let you print 8" square and 7" tall parts for pretty cheap which is honestly why it's so popular. Whether or not it's big enough for you and you're OK potentially printing pieces for cosplay costumes that have to fit together like a jigsaw is up to you.

u/Montagh451 · 4 pointsr/DMAcademy

I’ve been printing with an Ender 3 (Comgrow Creality Ender 3 3D Printer Aluminum DIY with Resume Print 220x220x250mm https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BR3F9N6 ) for the better part of the year and it’s been mostly great!

The base price there is pretty cheap comparatively, and 1kg of filament (printing material) is about $20. That will last you quite a long time and print dozens and dozens of miniatures.

The largest downsides are probably the learning curve. It definitely takes some time to learn settings. But there are lots of resources out there.

The other thing is that Ender 3 is FDM which essentially means the resolution isn’t quite as high. This is just fine for printing terrain but you get a “layering effect” making it difficult to get high quality detail on some minis. That being said I’ve had great success printing minis for npcs and monsters.

The other option is resin printing which generally produces higher resolution and detail but can be messier and resin is pretty toxic so requires more safety precautions.

Ultimately I’ve been happy with my 3D printer and it’s really enhanced my gaming experience

u/TashalovesSharks · 6 pointsr/TwoXChromosomes

haha! I actually bought it on amazon!
http://www.amazon.com/FlashForge-Structure-Optimized-Platform-Extruder/dp/B00I8NM6JO

It was definitely an expensive investment, but worth it. It makes prototyping things extremely efficient.

They can get pretty expensive, think Makerbots and stuff. But there are less expensive ones that do a great job too. /r/3Dprinting has a lot of great advice. There are some helpful forums elsewhere too.


This makes way more sense now... I couldn't believe you had seen that shark for $1,500.

u/xyster220 · 1 pointr/OpenForge

Having printed a LOT of these tiles, I would caution against relying on a public library as a resource.

These things take a LONG time to print enough to make an entire dungeon. It's unreasonable to assume that the librarian would be willing to allow you to continuously print that many. (I will easily print almost 24/7 for weeks at a time to complete a set)

That being said, they are very cool tiles... and it's unbelievable that they are offered for free, Devon Jones is the man, for sure!

I would greatly advise looking into purchasing your own printer... my pick for this would be an Ender 3. Check out some videos on YouTube, and join the Facebook user group to get a good idea of how to get started. The printers aren't that much, about $230 USD on Amazon right now... and it will be worth it in the long haul to invest.

As far as your attachment method, the bases can be magnetic... but the magnets do end up costing a lot if you use them in all the tiles... I quit doing this after a few sets.

The OpenLock design is based on an attachment type by printablescenery.com, and most of the files you find on Thingiverse.com will be based on this. It's pretty cheap, as you only use filament to print them, and they hold well.

The "grip liner" as you put it is a decent idea, but I don't think it would hold up to practical use, some of the tiles have seperate floor and wall tiles, which need to be glued together with the base to form the finished project. Also, they would like be a bit "janky".

Hopefully this advice helps. It is a fun world to get into, and though there is a lot to learn it can be rewarding.

u/dutchesse · 14 pointsr/Indiemakeupandmore

Honestly? You will screw up once or twice when you first start, but generally, it's a fairly easy process and you'll save yourself a lot of money in the long run by doing it yourself.

Just to give you an idea of how I do it, here are the items I use. If you have Amazon Student/Prime, it'll be even easier:

  • 26mm palette (this one is $19/3)

  • Pipettes

  • Jojoba oil

  • Double-ended spatula

  • Alcohol (I believe mine is 70%, but I'm not able to check on that. Either way, if you're living in a dorm, this is something you may want to have anyways in a first aid kit)

    For me, I mix it in small tupperware (obviously, I don't use this for storing food at anymore). For 2 small packets of Shiro samples (or even a minijar (both of which fit comfortably in the aforementioned palette)), I use a mixture of no more than 3 drops of jojoba oil and use alcohol to mix it into a paste, of which I then place into the aluminum palette.

    You don't want to use an excessive amount of the oil because then it will almost never dry and dilute the color. Whereas, alcohol evaporates out faster so you want to use more of the alcohol than the jojoba oil (or whatever binding solution you choose). Once it gets dried down to a certain point, you can press if you choose to, but I never feel I need to when I do it this way because it's generally pretty uniform.

    I know dorm rooms are crampy, but you can do this anywhere once you get the hang of it and for cheaper than having someone else do it (especially if you take into consideration the excessive shipping costs--which will be more than the cost of what you'd be using for some of these products alone).

    ETA: Added details.
u/noncongruent · 2 pointsr/DIY

One won't be near enough, though that depends on its size. As far as heat transfer, yeah, wort doesn't pump well at all, and if anything, keeping it circulation as opposed to still would probably give the little yeasties some indigestion. I can imagine a complex system of tubing, heat sinks, pumps, and heat exchange fluid, but that's probably beyond most people's motivations and abilities. I think that you can make essentially an insulated box that's cooled by the Peltiers, essentially a refrigerator, and use a glass carboy for better thermal transfer to the fluid.

For example:

https://www.mpja.com/Peltier-Cooling-Assembly-12VDC/productinfo/15312+PM

This module uses 6A at 12VDC to move just 170 Btu of heat. Fermentation is exothermic, so let's do some math. According to this:

https://byo.com/article/fermentation-temperature-control-tips-from-the-pros/

It's possible for the fermentation process to raise the temperature 20°F in 6 hours. A common batch size is 5 gallons. A BTU is the amount of heat necessarily to raise one pound of water one degree F. A gallon is 8 lbs, so to raise 5 gallons, which is 40 lbs, of wort 20°F takes 40x20=800 BTU, and to do it in 6 hours takes 800/6= 133.3 BTUh.

The main physical problem with Peltiers is that the hot and cold side heat sinks have to be close together, and that makes it difficult to use them in an insulated box because insulation requires thickness to be effective. You'll need fans, both internal and external, to move air past the heat sinks, and in the inside, to keep it circulating. Putting the modules in the lid would probably be the most effective solution as hot air rises and that brings that air to the modules via convection.

The more I think about this, the more difficult and expensive it looks, honestly. If you're lagering, I think you'd actually be better off money and power wise using a small refrigerator. Actually, maybe a small chest-style freezer with an external thermostat controller to turn it into a refrigerator might be a more practical approach. In fact, here's a decent one on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Inkbird-Thermostat-Temperature-Controller-Fermentation/dp/B015E2UFGM/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=Inkbird+ITC308&qid=1568383520&s=industrial&sr=1-4

That being said, it sounds like an interesting series of experiments to try!

u/it2d · 1 pointr/woodworking

Thanks! I hope there was something helpful in that post.

I really think a diamond plate is overkill, at least to start off with. I got really frustrated with how not-flat my stones were, but I couldn't justify spending a huge amount of money on a flat piece of metal. So I went to Menard's and bought a 3/32 pane of glass. I figured that was thin enough that it would still flex, so I put it on top of a piece of 3/4 MDF, and then put the sandpaper on top of the whole thing. It worked really well, and the total cost was under $5. Thin glass is really cheap, apparently.

The Veritas honing guide is really nice; I definitely want to get it eventually. But in the mean time, I'm using this $10 guide from Woodcraft, and I'm getting good results with it.

Finally, you really don't need anything fancy for stropping. Literally a piece of MDF with some compound will work. You can use something like this, which costs $6.50.

So you really don't need to invest more than maybe $20 to get from where you are to the place where you can get much better results.

u/Mitten_Punch · 2 pointsr/microgrowery

Cool. Very helpful.

The LED/HPS price gap is worth it, in the United States, where I can get HLG Quantum Boards or parts from Digikey without paying VAT/import tax. The LED panels on EBay are not worth buying. But if you can get current, best-gen LED, then yes, it's worthwhile. They cost ~40% less to run and cool, and you don't have to change bulbs like you do with HID lighting. Even if they cost 2x or 3x up front, you'll make that back in a year.

On to your setup: Things look good.

  • Secret Jardin is more expensive (again, in my market) then it should be. There isn't a lot of difference between a $60 1mx1m tent and a $120 1m SJ tent. Spend that money elsewhere.

  • For a ~3'x3' space, the 400w HID is the appropriate light. Get a dimmable ballast, so you can run a Metal Halide bulb during veg at 200w or 300w, then use your HPS at 400w for flower. If money is a worry, for now, buy cheap bulbs. Down the road you may want to buy nicer HPS bulbs (Eye Hortilux is the best, in my experience). But, for now, cheap is fine. Take a look at CoolTube kits. I'm only seeing this one, there must be more. Buying the bundle should save some money.

  • If possible, run a duct-fan (Winflex) just for your light. So, outside of tent -> ducting -> CoolTube + light -> ducting -> outside of tent. The air cooling the bulb should be separate from the air in your tent. And that fan runs whenever the light it on.

  • You want an inline (Can Fan) as your exhaust. And you want a programmable thermostat. . .although maybe not this one, if you are on 220v power. The idea is, only have the exhaust fan turn on when it needs to. In my situation, that is a 76F degree goal. When the tent hits 80, it kicks on and runs until it's below 76 again. This helps your carbon filter last longer, and also lets humidity/warmth build up as it needs to.

  • Pot sizes: I have a 1m/1m tent. I've run 6 x 3gallon pots. And 1 x 10gallon. So, it depends on how many plants you are growing. But aim for 15 gallons on soil total.
u/Search11 · 2 pointsr/intel

Valid concerns but trust me it’s a breeze to do. Given how hot your CPU gets you will benefit from a proper delid. Granted though you are still within safe temps. The temps are highish but they aren’t abnormal compared to most others. Higher temps do lessen the life of the CPU but we are talking a very small time span compared to the market life of the chip. I’d say you and 99% of all PC builders will have build a second or even third computer before silicone degradation even reaches minimal levels. If that makes sense. Yeah high temps kill it but it’s like saying the three cigarettes you smoked in high school took two minutes off your life when you live to be a hundred anyway. Analogy might be to the extreme but I wouldn’t worry about it.

With that said here’s some links that will help you.

Delid tool and re attachment tool:

https://rockitcool.myshopify.com

Plastic razor blades to remove stock glue (what you mentioned not knowing what to do with, yes remove it the easiest way I’ve done it was using these and a small amount of isopropyl alcohol):

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01D6EXLR0/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apip_nvYleOEGfw2EO

Silicone “glue” for IHS re attachment. To be honest the very first delid I did was a 3570k using wood a vice and a hammer and I didn’t reglue it. It’s still alive too. I would personally just use a very small amount on the four corners. Just enough to stick. You are correct in your concern about the stock glue causing the IHS to not make perfect contact with the die. Remove the stock crap and use minimal amount of this and it will be a non concern:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0002UEN1A/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apip_2g9BJXXKzhp9F

Lastly, your liquid metal for the die to IHS and your TIM for the IHS to Kraken. You can use any but it’s probably safe to say Grizzly is currently the go to stuff:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B011F7W3LU/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apip_6QNoes1d24uyu

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01A9KIGSI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apip_lBeHQg1WHWPGP



All in all it’s easy and it’s worth it. If you have any questions whatsoever message me or reply here. There are some good videos of walkthroughs (I think one really good one is on rockitcool’s website but I’m not sure). I can find them for you but tomorrow as I’m currently in bed and using a half open eye lid to write this.

u/Crosive · 1 pointr/buildapc

you don't have to, but with the stuff being so cheap, why risk it?

the best I've used is this
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B011F7W3LU/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=23R7QMLQ9U6KE&coliid=ISZDLEI3Q9A7F

I've noticed a few degrees difference over arctic silver, and have since used it on all my builds.

there are better solutions out there such as coolaboratory liquid ultra. But I wouldn't recommend that stuff to just anyone as it's not simply applied and done, it takes prep that possibly voids warranties, and you can't use it on aluminum.

having said that, I've seen better numbers with the liquid ultra than anything else, by a significant amount.

the next best being the kryonaut.

if anyone has anything better, I'm all ears. I'm always up for finding new and better stuff to try.

u/Cpt_Bringdown · 1 pointr/3Dprinting

Thanks for the advice guys. I still haven't decided if I will go for it, but I thought it might be worth summarizing a bit of research I did in case others come across this post.

Here is a useful table (that I hope is accurate) to give you a list of chemical resistances by plastic type.

After consulting a few more chemical resistance charts through many a google search, I found that PVDF would do the job, but it seems like it may be tough to keep consistent temperature for a good print, and I would need a heated build plate. I found a relatively inexpensive (~$340) printer from Monoprice that should be able to print at the temperature I need and though seems to be pushing it, the build plate seems like it can get hot enough to print PVDF.

I've found from sellers like this one and this one that print temperature should be around 210C with a bed temperature around 120C (both costing ~$200).

I haven't decided if I will go ahead and buy it to try out. It might be nice to have the 3D printer for other things even if this doesn't work. I will look into how easily I could just fashion the basket from a block as suggested as well.

u/Sausage54 · 3 pointsr/3Dprinting

The Ender-3 and Ender-3 Pro are good budget first printers. I would advise to buy the Pro over the standard Ender 3 since it has a Mean Well UL Certified power supply, rather a generic one. If you can afford it.

Recommend to buy it from Amazon for good customer service or Banggood and Aliexpress if you want the best price.

Ender-3: https://www.amazon.com.au/Comgrow-Creality-Ender-Aluminum-220x220x250mm/dp/B07BR3F9N6/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=ender+3&qid=1573525773&sr=8-1

Ender-3 Pro: https://www.amazon.com.au/Comgrow-Creality-Printer-Upgrade-Certified/dp/B07GYRQVYV/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=ender+3+pro&qid=1573525812&sr=8-3

There are other printers in that price range such as the Anycubic i3 Mega, Anet A8 and the Monoprice Select Mini, the Ender 3 is the most popular and easily available in Australia.

> Also wanting to know other than a printer what would I need to start 3d printing. i.e. what sort of computer programs and other periferals

You will need to install a slicer on your computer, which will convert 3D models into instructions for your 3D printer. If you don't want to have your printer plugged into your computer while it is printing, your computer will need to have an sd card slot, if not purchase an adapter.

Highly recommend reading through the Getting Started guide for this subreddit.

Also here is a guide on how to build the Ender 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=me8Qrwh907Q

And the Ender 3 Pro: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibsOYzXduYc

Hope that helps

u/HaggarShoes · 2 pointsr/fermentation

What's the unit of measurement for your dimensions?

If you want to go super cheap, I imagine you could could get a temperature regulator (two outlets and 1 temp probe); you could run a dedicated fan next to a space heater to keep the temperature moving around the space, while the probe sits somewhere in the middle of the room. You can set a temp range where on the low it would pop on the heater, and when it hits the top temperature it shuts off (and you could attach another fan in another part of the room/wall of the incubator to the other outlet which would switch on once it hits the top of the temp spectrum you hit to promote ventiliation and more quickly cool it down).

The space heater I suppose would be overkill for a 2 foot container, but if it's 6 feet (meters) it would be a lot. You could even scrap the extra fan by getting a heater that oscillates with a fan and then use the second outlet, again, to promote ventilation.

Not sure how ideal this would be for super consistent temperatures, but temp regulators are pretty darn cheap. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B011296704/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1 is what I used with a medium sized styrofoam cooler and a 60W bulb. It worked quite well.

u/Fissional · 4 pointsr/3Dprinting

Looking at the price of some of the printers recommended here you aren't far off the price of the Monoprice Maker Select V2 right now. It is on sale for $280 from Monoprice (Use code MAKER15 at checkout for the discount) or Amazon right now. Free shipping from Monoprice. (not sure what country you are in so maybe that will make a difference for you on shipping)

If you can stretch your budget about $40-50 you will get a highly recommended printer (here and other sites) that is very easy to setup, has a large community/support for tweaking/upgrading later, and takes 15-20 minutes to setup out of the box (its pre-assembled, literally 6 screws to build it). Also it prints fantastic out of the box, and with a few minor upgrades it rivals printers far above its price range.

I recently got a MP Select v1 with an upgraded hot end and PEI laid on the bed for 230 shipped on eBay. It has been working great, so far. I honestly wouldn't recommend buying a used printer for your first one though (exactly what I did) as it is a gamble and mine field right now with used printers, (I got lucky thankfully and was covered by eBay if anything was wrong).

Also, depending on your requirements of build volume, I would highly recommend looking at the MP Select Mini Amazon. It has a 4x4x4" build area, comes completely pre-assembled and leveled (most of the time leveled) out of the box. Literally unpack, and print. It is highly recommended here and other places for an entry level/low budget printer. Very high quality prints from it, the only downside is the smaller build area, but that depends on each person/use case. It is portable, so trade offs I suppose.

TL;DR: The Maker Select V2 is on sale right now for about $40 more than the prices of most printers linked here, and it is an outstanding printer out of the box, and highly recommended. If you can stretch your budget a little, I would buy that. If you need to save and don't need a large build volume I recommend the MP Select Mini. Don't get caught up on one specific sale/website, keep an eye on other options as there are sales other places.

TL;DR of TL;DR:
See also

Source: Have been in the same too expensive boat for 3 years. Finally purchased a MP Select for my first printer last week and out of the box got fantastic prints with 0 knowledge/experience.

u/BrotherCorvus · 2 pointsr/3Dprinting

First off, check out the Wiki:
https://www.reddit.com/r/3Dprinting/wiki/index
https://www.reddit.com/r/3Dprinting/wiki/gettingstarted#wiki_what_printer_to_get
https://www.reddit.com/r/3Dprinting/comments/ckjcu6/purchase_advice_megathread_what_to_buy_who_to_buy/

The only one I have personal experience with is a Wanhao Duplicator i3. It's fine for what I paid for it three years ago, but there are better options available today.

I'm posting links from Amazon below because I'm lazy. You can probably shave off $20 or more if you do some bargain hunting. Beware of shady dealers though -- some will give you opened/used stuff, so check the reviews.

The consensus here for the best quality bottom-dollar printer seems to be the Ender 3 at around $230:
https://www.amazon.com/Comgrow-Creality-Ender-Aluminum-220x220x250mm/dp/B07BR3F9N6

The Monoprice Mini is supposed to be good too, but I would find the limited build volume annoying.

The cheapest one I would personally consider buying today is the Ender 5 at around $350. I like printers that are designed so the print bed doesn't have to shuttle the whole print back and forth with every movement in the y direction -- in general, you can get high quality prints at faster print speeds if the print bed is only moving slowly in the z direction and the hotend does all the jerky x and y movement.
https://www.amazon.com/Comgrow-Creality-Printer-Printing-Function/dp/B07KQ2MTGM

If I was going to spend a little more for some nice bonus features, I'd probably go with a Monoprice Ultimate 2 at $550:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07V9YBVY9/ref=sspa_dk_detail_3?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B07V9YBVY9

If my budget was higher ($800-$1200), and I had a ton of free time, I'd build a Voron from parts:
http://vorondesign.com/
https://www.reddit.com/r/voroncorexy/comments/86vs8b/why_is_voron_superior_comparing_to_others_3d/

u/lenenenenen · 2 pointsr/Ask3D

Don't purchase a Delta for your first printer - they're far more hassle than worth. For 900USD, I'd recommend the Flashforge Creator Pro. A replicator 2 clone that's built great, pretty much plug and play, comes with filament. Has to be set up with something like Sli3r or Cura but it's not very difficult and there is a great tutorial here.

i've used it before (with PLA) and the enclosure / heated build plate do great things for the quality of the print, fairly good build volume and top rated on 3dprinthubs.

u/Slippery_Fat_Man · 1 pointr/3Dprinting

Pretty new to 3d printing but really interested. I basically just want to print stuff that people post and probably dabble in designing my own stuff. I am a technical guy, but I know that the designing of the models is pretty tough. I have sifted through the comments and saw two printers that stood out to me within the range I was thinking of. The CR-10 and the Prusa i3. I don't know which version is good for the CR-10 and I'm looking in the $400 range, but could go up to $800 if you guys think my value would be best there. Here are other printers I was looking at and not sure how everyone feels about those. If anyone can give me some feedback about them it'll help immensely in my decision.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00I8NM6JO/_encoding=UTF8?coliid=I3MX1XJ2F9XGZ7&colid=30UBVRH3KC9LH

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07421SR9J/_encoding=UTF8?coliid=I3SEAHNKKLM0QY&colid=30UBVRH3KC9LH

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B016R9E7J2/_encoding=UTF8?coliid=I205Z5A0OGO6ZD&colid=30UBVRH3KC9LH

u/anonymoose_octopus · 1 pointr/bettafish

Buy an Inkbird Temperature Controller. I also worry about this, but since I've installed these for my tanks it's like a weight off my shoulders. You basically plug the heater into it, and once the thermometer built into the device reads that it's at your desired temperature, it cuts the power to the heater. It's a great device for peace of mind.

Just to put your mind a little more at ease though, I think heater related fires are very rare, and probably because someone wasn't using it correctly or heating their tanks too much. I've heard great things about Hydor 50W (and I'm actually using the 25W right now with no controller). You're fine. :)

u/compto35 · 2 pointsr/beards

Inventory:

u/Neur0nauT · 1 pointr/RDR2

To be honest, I stopped using Afterburner. I was noticing weird power and heating issues. Now I just use the Adrenalin in-game menu (Alt-R) to change Wattman settings and other things if I want to. And the in-game overlay to monitor temp and FPS (Ctrl+Shift+O) Generally I haven't even been overclocking anything. Just using Chill. IT makes a "boopy-beep" noise when it is enabled. If you use Chill...make sure to disable vsync. I had the same issue as you with certain games when using Afterburner and messing about with some overclocking and power tweaks, so it might be worth uninstalling it, and doing a full clean of your AMD drivers with DDU then get the latest version. I've lerned that Afterburner doesn;t really work well alongside Wattman on the Adrenalin drivers.

DDU download on Guru3d

Make sure you are using Vulkan as the API in game, and try lowering the resolution scale to 90% also. This will look blurry, but it might tell you if your GPU is just being pushed too much to handle things.

I also use a program called AIDA 64 which has a desktop gadget which gives me on screen display of all my temps, fan speeds, CPU/GPU speed, memory use etc. This can be displayed on my second screen. The AMD overlay works just as well for the GPU at least. Note: the FPS counter only seems to display when in fullscreen mode.

So in summary.... try getting rid of Afterburner and reinstall your AMD drivers. Keep Ambient Occlusion off. Consider re-pasting your GPU. Its probably out of warranty by now anyway and it really helps.

Video on re-pasting

Thermal Grizzly on Amazon

Thermal Paste Cleaner on Amazon

Good Luck!

u/F41LUR3 · 2 pointsr/wow

Cheap option, get this (might be a tight squeeze, requires removing the side panel fan): https://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-RR-212E-20PK-R2-Direct-Contact/dp/B005O65JXI

Best option, get this (also requires removing that side panel fan, but might be a tiny bit easier to fit in as it's 2mm shorter): https://www.amazon.com/Noctua-NH-U12S-Premium-Cooler-NF-F12/dp/B00C9EYVGY

unless you don't want to remove the side-panel fan at all, then get this, still great cooling: https://www.amazon.com/noctua-Premium-Cooler_Retail-Cooling-NH-C14S

It would also be helpful to know your motherboard model to check the compatibility list. But I'm fairly certain these coolers should fit regardless.

They include decent thermal paste, but the FX8350 is one of the hotter chips and it might be worthwhile to squeeze a few extra degrees out with this paste: https://www.amazon.com/Thermal-Grizzly-Kryonaut-Grease-Paste/dp/B011F7W3LU

u/twinbee · 1 pointr/Magnets

Thanks! I'm a home user, and yes I meant 200kg force (Ebay sells them for about £40).

> Ok so to answer your question: you could wrap it in a rubber mold (which you can paint on in layers)

Any high rated product from Amazon.co.uk you can recommend? How about something like this: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Plastidip-Plastic-Rubber-Paint-400ml/dp/B0006SU3QW

Also maybe this? http://www.amazon.co.uk/250mls-Liquid-Latex-Mold-Special/dp/B004FPMN4C

I think the idea with this second one is to dip objects in multiple times (waiting minutes or hours between each layer), and each time a layer is added. You can dip multiple times, and get it as thick as you want.

> or even glue on sheets of rubber (probably your best bet)

Again, any product page you can point me to? Hopefully, UHU all purpose glue will stick it together. This approach will look less 'clean' than the previous though...

I don't mind not using rubber by the way.

> Remember, the thicker your protective layer, the bigger your air gap, and the weaker the strength will be.

If the distance is more than a few centimetres, the force will be the same AFAIK. It's only weaker in the sense that the metal can't physically touch the actual magnet if it's got a coating.

> And as always, be careful with magnets that strong!

That's why I want to get it coated :)

How do you rate the safety of a cube versus a cylinder versus a sphere? A sphere has no sharp edges or corners, but perhaps more importantly, flat metallic objects won't have so much surface area to 'touch' the spherical surface completely (unless the object was also curved like the magnet, which is unlikely).

Not sure how easy it is to detach metal objects from a 2" diameter sphere though compared to an equivalently strong cube (about 1.6" cube).

> They are cool and fun, but things go wrong very quickly in ways you will not expect.

Any stories to share? Have you ever come close to an accident?

u/elucidatum · 4 pointsr/3Dprinting

I highly advise going with the MAX v3 at that price-point. That Hatchbox delta others are recommending is quite a step down in quality and features for the price. Considering it's just a relabeled Chinese Kossel kit, the value just isn't there.

The MAX v3 is a much higher quality printer with more features and better construction, but, you have to build it yourself. IF you can swing the build, you're going to be a lot more happy with the v3 over the Alpha.

However, if you absolutely need/want an assembled printer at that price, look into the Flashforge Creator Pro. It's a solid printer that will give you great quality and provides dual extrusion capability, although dual extrusion can be difficult to get right with that design. Many people have fantastic success with it though.

I'd highly suggest just going with the MAX v3 kit though. The hardest part is soldering some large gauge wires to a flat contact on the heated bed, which you can find video instructions for in the SeeMeCNC assembly guide. If you just don't think you can solder anything, look into that Creator Pro.

u/[deleted] · 2 pointsr/3Dprinting

I personally love the Ender 3 by Creality, it has a little of assembly but its way worth it, I would watch a few videos on youtube about it. You will also have to level the bed, this is my favorite way to do that, Chep Ender 3 Bed Level. some great filament is this.

Good luck!

u/ILikeLenexa · 9 pointsr/linux4noobs

What is big?

What are you planning on printing in? PLA like normal people or ABS which needs a heated bed and to be much better ventilated?

Anycubic i3 Mega is 8.3 x 8.3 x 8.1 inches

If you're literally just looking for the cheapest way into 3D printing Microcenter has PowerSpec Duplicator i3 Mini for $150.

Its build area is 5.9" x 5.9" x 4.5" and it uses 1.75mm PLA

You'll probably be printing a lot more things smaller if you're experimenting around since double the length, width, and height cubes the volume (though there's a lot more filament in the shell than infill).

Also, Cura or any other slicer that works on Linux is going to take .stl files and output gcode files to an SD Card and you can then print from the SD card in the printer without the computer attached.

Anycubic boasts 10 microns, but the layer height 100-400 is going to be your main source of "quality" in my opinion and it can match that. What you're giving up is mostly the ability to print ABS, potentially the ability to print Glow-in-the-dark PLA (you need a hardened steel rather than brass tip for this), and heated bed.

Obviously, the Creality C10 and Tevo Tornado and if it's me, and I have $350 in my hand, I'm going to grab a Tevo Tornado.

And of course: Monoprice's Budget Model is small, but gives you the heated bed and hot-end temperatures to do ABS, etc. if you wanted to.

I'm pretty sure that they can all just print GCODE from your SD Cards.

I'd be remiss if I didn't plug Octo-print

u/sofauxboho · 1 pointr/electronic_cigarette

They do still make the Provari, and even have the older versions. And they're still expensive! But if you're willing to invest it really is exactly what you describe wanting for the way you vape, minus the TC stuff. And they really do last. I beat on mine for a year and a half and only stopped using it when I "upgraded" to higher output but worse made devices.

The corrosion and gunk issues you've described would explain the resistance variance you've observed. Electrical connections really want to be clean. Even oxidation or corrosion you can't see will have an effect. If you can see it, it will likely have a major effect. I'd suggest a simple ultrasonic cleaner and some scrubbing. I have this $40 model and it works a treat: http://www.amazon.com/Magnasonic-Professional-Ultrasonic-Instruments-MGUC500/dp/B007Q2M17K

If you want to get super serious about cleaning (and you might want to!) grab some of this to go with: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000F1SCU4/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_2?pf_rd_p=1944687722&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B007Q2M17K&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=05BD3DRA83NHH7PY2V62

And you're right. I know people who keep the same Ecig for years, and I know people who post about ecigs on the internet, but not anybody who does both. Good on yah for actually getting your money's worth out of your gear! I hope you can find something that'll hold up. I will say that my authentic Kayfun didn't degrade the way you describe, and I had it for a year. You might try and figure if yours is authentic or not.

u/JonSAlberta · 2 pointsr/GPDPocket

Hi
I would not adjust your Bios settings without giving the CPU better cooling.

I used Grizzly Kryonaut Thermal Grease Paste. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B011F7W3LU

with

Fujipoly smart Extreme X-e Thermal Pad 11.0 W/mK https://www.amazon.com/Fujipoly-mod-smart-Extreme-Thermal/dp/B00ZSJQX0E I put 2 layers of 1mm thermal pads on the heat pipe from above the CPU to halfway to the fan.

For the thermal pads I followed the general idea in this https://imgur.com/a/uAzmc#CsPVeRf

My pads are close to this pattern:
https://i.imgur.com/CsPVeRf.jpg
I used larger pads directly over the CPU. The pad over the Fan discharge is intended to stop air from leaking around the copper cooling fins but the joint already had tight tolerances in my laptop so I used those pads around the CPU instead.

I followed the instructions on this post to adjust the bios:

https://www.reddit.com/r/GPDPocket/comments/6s7zck/my_unlocked_bios_working_settings_dptf_limit/

Although I set my temp limits at 80C instead of 85C. Not that it matters with the cooling I have I can't get the CPU above 70C even running the Prime 95 stress tests for 30 minutes.

I hope this helps. You don't need the exact brand of paste or pads I used, I just included them in case anyone was curious.

I also tried 2 other kids of pads but they don't stick to a surface so I did not like using them. (Phobya Thermal Pad XT 7W/mk and Fujipoly 17.0 W/mK pad)

I should give credit; the thermal pad post was by ZiggyDeath and the BIOS settings were by neoak.

I am please with the way my system has worked out. I hope you are pleased with yours.

Have a good one.

Jon

u/Exodus5000 · 1 pointr/woodworking

1/4, 1/2, 3/4 will get you started, you can fill in as you go. I bought my first 'real' set of chisels only a few months ago too, and I saved some money without sacrificing on quality by buying old Stanley chisels, you can find them online and sometimes at antique stores, but make sure you know what they're worth, antique stores like to charge an arm and a leg for broken tools. I was lucky to find a complete set at an antique store at a fair price.

Right now I'm lusting after the Veritas PM-V11 bench chisels: http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=69619&cat=1,41504. I'm doing mental gymnastics trying to convince myself how I might be able to justify their price.

When you get a good set of starter chisels I suggest you watch Paul Sellers' video on sharpening chisels: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ki8tt-VjwqI. You can do it completely with sandpaper and a homemade strop rubbed with chromium oxide.

You can get enough chromium oxide to last you a lifetime for less than $15 on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Woodstock-D2902-1-Pound-Buffing-Compound/dp/B0000DD35C/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418003499&sr=8-1&keywords=chromium+oxide

You'll rub that stuff on a homemade strop, you can me one for less than $5 or you can buy a $30 one that is quite literally the same thing at woodcraft. To make one just go to a craft store like Hobby Lobby and buy a bag of their cheap strips of leather (less than $5), you'll find them usually by where they sell moccasin making kits, not the bolts of fabric. You want the strips that are a little rougher. Then you'll just take it home and glue it to a piece of 2x4. Polishing your chisels on a leather strop primed with your buffing agent will make mirror chisels.

u/kscannon · 3 pointsr/3Dprinting

Prices are without promotions. Monoprice are often on sale.

$200 Monoprice mini. Small 120mm^3, fast to out grow. Good secondary printer. Would be good if you plan to get a nicer, bigger one in the future.
https://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-Select-Printer-Heated-Filament/dp/B01FL49VZE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1479528271&sr=8-1&keywords=monoprice+mini

$320-400 Monoprice Maker Select/Wanhao I3. Same machine, monoprice is a rebrand and has a cheaper base price. Larger then the mini at 200mm by 200mm by 180mm. Good machine to start out with. Does have some cheap parts but is easy to work on and there is a large community to help out.
https://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-13860-Maker-Select-Printer/dp/B018GZBC3Y/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1479528290&sr=8-2&keywords=monoprice+mini

$700-800 Prusa I3 MK2. Available in kit form or pre built. High quality machine with parts to match. Same size as the Maker Select. Prusa offers addition upgrades to keep the machine relivenent like the multi-material upgrade that changes the machine from having 1 extruder to 4. If you are able to, this may be the best machine to start with.
http://shop.prusa3d.com/en/3d-printers/59-original-prusa-i3-mk2-kit.html


Edit: added links

u/Kaldaus · 2 pointsr/Vaping101

This is an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner its under 30$ and works really well, you can use this to clean all your vape stuff and it takes very little effort. I highly suggest looking into getting one, it will save you a LOT of time and effort, and really works a lot better anyway, best of luck to you and happy vaping :)

https://www.amazon.com/Magnasonic-Professional-Ultrasonic-Eyeglasses-MGUC500/dp/B007Q2M17K

u/alienwrkshop51 · 5 pointsr/Charcuterie

This. Is. Awesome.

I currently have a Monster cooler like this that is set up as a curing chamber with a simple temperature and humidity controller.

I would love to be able to integrate something like what you made into my setup. The data logging and interface are super nifty! Definitely let us know when/if you pull something together.