Reddit mentions of Designing Sound (The MIT Press)

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Reddit mentions: 13

We found 13 Reddit mentions of Designing Sound (The MIT Press). Here are the top ones.

Designing Sound (The MIT Press)
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Found 13 comments on Designing Sound (The MIT Press):

u/darkworldaudio · 5 pointsr/Filmmakers

I have a kick-ass book called Sound Design and Science Fiction by William Whittington but it isn't very technical so perhaps combine it with Designing Sound by Andy Farnell to help form opinions and drive discussion. Hope that helps!

u/TheCheat3 · 4 pointsr/sounddesign

I actually just bought "Designing Sound" by Andy Farnell today. It was the textbook for a class I took in college focused on basic sound synthesis. Can't recommend it enough, though I will say it focuses on Pure Data (which is a lot like Max/MSP). It's great for learning a basic understanding of sound synthesis. I've also heard the Foley Grail and the Sound Effects Bible are good for film/game sound design.

Edit: link: Designing Sound (MIT Press) https://www.amazon.com/dp/0262014416/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_M-PzzbV1H1721

u/iamktothed · 4 pointsr/Design

Interaction Design

u/gtani · 3 pointsr/synthesizers

There's a few books you can check out (I stumbled onto most of these in my local community college library, and yes, some of these are really expensive). I can suggest more if you like


http://www.amazon.com/Make-Analog-Synthesizers-Ray-Wilson/dp/1449345220/

http://www.amazon.com/Handmade-Electronic-Music-Hardware-Hacking/dp/0415998735/

http://www.amazon.com/Theory-Technique-Electronic-Music/dp/9812700773/

https://www.amazon.com/Designing-Sound-Press-Andy-Farnell/dp/0262014416

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and some subs: /r/diySynth, /r/SynthDiy, /r/modular

u/magoghm · 3 pointsr/GameAudio

The book Designing Sound is good overview/tutorial of sound synthesis techniques. It uses Pure Data for its examples. Pure Data is easy to learn so it might be a good option to get started with sound synthesis. Later on you might want to experiment with more powerful tools such as Csound.

u/[deleted] · 2 pointsr/edmproduction

By far the best book I've ever owned on digital synthesis is Andy Farnell's Designing Sound. Sticks to PD, mainly focusing on sound replication, but is an invaluable and practical resource. Further info.

u/GretschElectromatic · 2 pointsr/puredata

Andy Farnell's book, Designing Sound models combustion engines in pD. I believe he uses waveguides, not sure. You should be able to borrow a copy from the library.

You can find all the pD code examples from his book here. Look under machines and cars.

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u/mick010238 · 2 pointsr/experimentalmusic

I made a sort of generative music system in Max/MSP while in college about 3 years ago. It was very simple. If I remember correctly, it was about 8 oscillators producing sine tones, playing notes at random intervals. The notes were set before hand by me. They were all going through a reverb I think. And I also gave the user control over how loud each oscillator could be, so they sort of controlled the soundscape.

Max is similar to PD, but is a bit more user friendly I think. It's a lot more appealing to look at too in my opinion, but costs a subscription.

https://www.amazon.com/Designing-Sound-Press-Andy-Farnell/dp/0262014416 this book is the shit for all of this. Pretty sure all of his Pure Data files from the book are online somewhere too

u/misterinterrupt · 2 pointsr/synthesizers

One of my favorite books Designing Sound:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/0262014416/
The beginning is an overview of sound, the back is practical examples of sound recreations. These use graphic examples via screenshots of PureDats patches but if you don't already know it, they are just little flow charts. Between those two parts are a whole lot of other great stuff. Easy to learn a ton from this book..

u/teffflon · 1 pointr/sounddesign

Andy Farnell - Designing Sound

Uses Pure Data, which is similar to Max but free. The many practical examples are fantastic; they tackle many non-musical sources and they combine careful physical-modeling considerations with pragmatic corner-cutting (and try to help you understand when it is OK to simplify). Farnell seems to be a leading thinker on procedural SFX generation for videogames.

It's a different focus than the Cipriani-Giri books, I think, which are also good but more aimed at understanding traditional audio-DSP functions in depth (filters, reverb, etc.).