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Reddit reviews: The best outdoor decor

We found 2,124 Reddit comments discussing the best outdoor decor. We ran sentiment analysis on each of these comments to determine how redditors feel about different products. We found 1,169 products and ranked them based on the amount of positive reactions they received. Here are the top 20.

Top Reddit comments about Outdoor D‚cor:

u/knerys · 15 pointsr/ballpython

Enclosure
Glass tanks with screen lids are very bad for ball pythons, you should be looking at getting a tub set up (using a rubber maid/sterilite /iris tub & soldering or drilling holes into the sides - here is a good tutorial of setting that up ). Or you would be wanting to get a PVC enclosure. I have an Animal Plastics T8 for my ball python, it did take about five weeks for it to show up, though. So if you want to go this route, plan way ahead. The tub route is cheaper, but takes more DIY skills. The PVC cage route is more expensive, but very aesthetically pleasing. To make a glass tank work, I suggest covering three sides with foam board to help insulate, and covering most of the screen lid with saran wrap or foil to keep humidity in. Also you would want to ditch the aspen and get something like coconut husk.

Humidity
A ball python needs at the minimum 60% humidity. This is incredibly difficult to achieve in a glass tank with a screen top. A tub or PVC enclosure makes this super easy. Humidity should be measured on the ground with a digital hygrometer. The stick on humidity gauges that pet stores hawk are often inaccurate and can cause serious injury or even death if they come unstuck from the wall and stick to your snake. I use this two in one hygrometer / thermometer.

Temperature
Ball pythons need a thermogradiant w one end at between 88F & 90F & a cool end of 78Fish - the ambient temperature should never be below 75F, & should be around high 70's. In a tub or a PVC enclosure, you will want an under tank heater - heat tap, heat mats, heat pads. I recommend the flexwatt that you can get with the Animal Plastics enclosure or the ultratherm from Reptile Basics. If you have trouble keeping the ambient up in the PVC enclosure, you may want to get a radiant heat panel, which installs to the ceiling of the enclosure. For a glass tank, you will probably need a ceramic heat emitter installed over the cage to keep ambient temperatures appropriate. CHE sucks out humidity, so you will need to be extra on top of that. CHE gives off no visible light. Red lights are often given out like candy at PetCo/Smart places as good ways to provide heat at night. They are not. Ball pythons can see red light, and it messes up their day/night cycle. I don't have recommendations for CHE because I don't use them.

Thermostats
Any & all heat sources you have for your BP need to be controlled by a thermostat. Failure to appropriately control your heat source can lead to it quickly becoming 120F & injuring your snake. I highly recommend Spyder Robotics Herpstats. You can get larger ones w more probes so that you can control all your heat sources w one unit. They have a ton of good safety features & a lot of people on this sub can answer any questions you have on them. The cheaper ones are around $100ish. If that is too much for you, there are a lot of people who use the Jumpstart thermostats, but they have less safety features & can wear out quickly. They also make a loud clicking sound periodically. I cannot stress this enough, this is not a place to cut corners. You need a thermostat.

Thermometers
I already linked to my recommended combo hygro/thermometer. This thermometer is great because it has a small probe to measure "outside" temperatures. I use this probe to measure the floor on my warm side (I hide it on the ground under the substrate so I know the absolute hottest place my BP can get to). I place the unit itself on the cool side, so I know all my temps & the humidity on one unit. You will also want an IR thermometer gun (there might be better recs than this one). This is good for spot checking temperatures without moving around probes & also checking the temps of the prey items.

Hides
You want at least two similar, enclosed hides. Half logs are NOT suitable, they are too open & they stress out the BP, as they can't watch both ends at once for a predator. Some of the best hides are these ones from Reptile Basics. They are enclosed on all sides with just a small entrance. They are dishwasher safe & also very cheap. You want them to be similar if not identical, so that the snake does not have to choose between feeling safe & thermoregulating. You will want one on each side of the temperature gradient. Feel free to add more that are different for diversity in the enclosure. I also have some fake vines/leaves in mine so that she feels more invisible. Go to a craft store or the fish supplies for these, the ones marketed for reptiles are way overpriced.

Water dish
You will want a water bowl that is large enough for the BP to soak in. This should be changed daily, as they like to poop & pee in their water. You'll want something sturdy as they like to tip them over. I got some crock dishes from Reptile Basics. You don't need any water treatment for the snakes water unless you treat water for yourself. If you tap is safe for human consumption, it's safe for your snake.

Feeding
BP's eat every 5 - 7 days as hatchlings and yearlings, as adults they can go longer. BP's are NOTORIOUSLY picky eaters. The ideal IMO for a BP is a proper sized rat fed either pre-killed or frozen/thawed. I feed frozen/thawed rats from Perfect Prey. Just a heads up - they ship with fiber glass insulation & dry ice. I try to open the packages outside so my cats don't get into it. They come in freezer bags and I just store them in my regular freezer. If even one thing is wrong in your husbandry, your BP will likely not eat.

How Much To Feed
The feeding amount depends on the weight of the BP. You will want a digital kitchen scale - you can get one cheaply at any box store. While under 750g, you want to feed about 10%-15% of their body weight about every 7 days. Once they are in their second year you want to feed 7%-10% of their body weight, after they are in their third year, you want to feed about 5% every 7 to 14 days. I document all feeding days and the weight of the prey in my google calender.

You should be weighing your snake at least once a month to track how much you should be feeding. You should not disturb or move or handle your snake for at least 48 hours after feeding.

Frozen / Thawed
I get the rat out the night before the day I want to feed. I put it in the fridge. About two hours before I feed, I get it out of the fridge and put it on the counter to get it to room temp. And then I soak it in a zip lock bag in warmish water (I use a temp gun to get water around 110F) for about 20 minutes, and use a temp gun to make sure the rat is around 100F, and then I run the head under running hot water until its 110F. The head of the prey should be warmer so the snake has a target. I then use tongs to move it around in the enclosure to mimic it being alive. She (usually) strikes pretty quickly. If she doesn't, I leave it in overnight, and throw it out in the morning if she doesn't eat it.

I prefer frozen thawed cause I can buy cheaply in bulk. It's also safer. As BP's get bigger, they require larger prey - and rats have sharp teeth and sharp claws and can seriously injure your snake.

Myths of Cage Aggression
You do not need a separate cage for feeding it. This is a myth. The best way to reduce stress at feeding time is to feed in their regular enclosure. This minimizes the risk of regurgitation.

Substrate
Stay away from aromatic woods - such as pine. A lot of people like to use coconut husk, unprinted newspaper, or paper towels. There are pros and cons to each. I like paper towels, they are cheap and easy to clean up messes with. I use PVC enclosure so I don't need a substrate that helps with humidity like coconut husk. This should be spot cleaned whenever a mess is made. My BP likes burrowing under the paper towels. She creates "underground" tunnels. Aspen chips can mold super easily so not really recommended. If you have a chip type substrate and are worry about ingestion of substrate while feeding, put a plate down before hand.

u/_ataraxia · 3 pointsr/ballpython

your BP isn't just thin, she's emaciated. you need to put some weight on her, but you need to do so gradually. you also really need to feed her f/t before she gets injured by live prey. if your enclosure is meeting her needs, and you're not causing her stress by handling her unnecessarily, she should eat f/t for you just fine. i guarantee she wasn't eating f/t at petsmart because she was stressed due to poor husbandry.

i'm going to dump a TON of information on you. some of it may be redundant, some of it may be useful. first, three detailed care sheets, a tub setup tutorial, and product recommendations to cover all types of enclosures. then i'll give you a breakdown of how i handled my emaciated BP, simultaneously putting weight on her safely and switching her from mice to rats. you'll fine more generalized feeding tips in the third care sheet. read everything thoroughly, then come back with any questions.

since i don't see any mention of what your enclosure is like, i'll start with this: glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.

    now for a suggested feeding regimen. if your BP will genuinely only eat live right now, you can safely start her on appropriately sized rat pinkies/fuzzies/pups. if their eyes haven't opened yet, they won't be able to bite her hard enough to cause injuries. once she fills out a little and can more comfortably skip a few meals, you should start working on switching her to f/t.

    at the time of rescue, my BP's weight was 140g, meals were one fuzzy mouse with an estimated weight of 5g, meal schedule was "once every few weeks". here's a breakdown of the meal sizes, schedule, and switch from mice to rats i used. this is all f/t, so dealing with live will be a little different.

  • week 1: settling in.
  • week 2: one fuzzy mouse, 5g, ~3% of BP's weight.
  • week 3: two fuzzy mice, total 8g, ~5%.
  • week 4: one fuzzy mouse, 5g. one rat pinky scented with the mouse, 5g. total 10g, ~7%.
  • week 5: BP weight 155g. one hopper mouse, 10g. one scented rat pinky, 6g. total 17g, ~10%.
  • week 6: one adult mouse, 14g. one scented rat pinky, 6g. total 19g, ~13%.
  • week 7: one fuzzy mouse, 4g. one scented rat pup, 20g. total 24g, ~15%.
  • week 8: BP weight 160g. one scented rat pup, 24g, ~15%.

    i continued scenting her rats for another couple of months, but that was more because it was easy [i have a corn who eats mice] than it being necessary. she was readily eating unscented rats within five months. a couple years later, i usually don't even have to warm up her rats beyond room temperature, though she does require some dangling with the tongs as she won't eat anything she hasn't "killed".
u/ColoradoBadger · 6 pointsr/microgrowery


Cost Analysis

Tent Setup

$70 2' x 4' x 5' Mylar tent

  • Holding up well, easy build. Is not 100% dark, light leaks outwards from spots along the zipper and pinholes but no light leak into the tent during dark. Perfect size for my light.


    $325 Lights: Horticulture Lighting Group 260 QB LED Kit

  • I cannot say enough about these lights. I had to run them anywhere from 50-75% during veg to prevent light burn. Great coverage for a 2x4 tent. Nothing but praise 10/10 would buy again.


    Climate Control

    $100 ($90 + $10)4" Inline duct fan and Carbon Filter + Ducting/clamps from ACE

  • This puppy can SUCK, I have to keep it on the lowest setting to prevent the pressure inside the tent from dropping (need to work on my passive intake next grow). Carbon filter works great. Lowers humidity in a pinch. It keeps my humidity at or below 50%, which is what it maxes out at after a watering.


    $21 Osculating Fan Purchased on a flash deal

  • I have it elevated about 3-4 inches on a box. Running and osculating 24/7. It pushes air, not a jet engine though.

    Already on hand: Box Fan

  • Had one from years ago. Sometimes I open the tent and blast this on high right on level with the buds just go shake out the leaves, gets a bit crowded in the scrog and I'd like to eliminate any humidity caught between leaves sticking together. Think you can scoop one from Walmart for like $15 bucks, $20 max. I also have room at the right edge of my tent where I normally keep the oscilating fan to drop this in and use it in a humidity pinch.

    $25 [Humidifier] (https://www.walmart.com/ip/Sunbeam-Warm-Mist-Humidifier-SWM6000-BWM/32664862)

  • This puppy does well. I use the first setting, usually can run 16+ hours on a full reservoir of H20. No filter which keeps cost down, just need to clean it one or twice a week with a brush for the hard water deposits. 5-10 minute process.

    $45 Dehumidifier

  • This was a bit of a mistake purchase. I wanted to test and see if a small model offered on amazon (this looked to be one of the best for sub $50, and has the biggest holding tank out of them all) could put in any kind of noticeable work in a tent. What I noticed is that it will be able to roughly maintain humidity at times, after I run the exhaust fan to lower the levels. When the lights are out and the temperature drops, this thing has no chance. Go with a full size dehumidifier or rely on the dry Colorado air + passive intake + duct fan. I was struggling with humidity issues during the cold of the winter, now that I can have my windows open my ambient room humidity is usually 40% or below.

    $18 4" inline duct booster fan

  • Also a mistake purchase. Does not move a lot of air. Had plans to use this for an airflow/passive (not) intake system but it's not worth the electricity cost to run this thing. I'd stay away.


    Meters (Ph, PPM, Soil, Temp and Humidity)

    $18 Hygrometer for Temp/Humidity

  • Worth it to get the wireless monitor so you're not opening the tent all the time)

    $13 Ph Meter

  • Great little Meter. Calibrated nicely and seems to be holding true. Details about storage below under the calibration Solution

    $12 TDS PPM meter

  • Quick measurements, came with a little leather storage pouch. Can't recommend against it.

    $9 Soil Moisture, Light, Ph meter

  • Does it's job well, reads soil Ph and moisture well and pretty instantaneously. I wouldn't recommend it for getting detailed light readings but it responds correctly.


    Ph Control and Calibration

    $9 Ph Control Kit

    $14 Ph Calibration solution

  • For calibration/life of the tip:I store the tip in a bit of 7.0 solution that I pour into the cap. Good to have on hand for calibration.



    Plants / Growing Medium

    $80 Clones - $20 from dispensary. here's a link to the strain page and the clone page. Don't believe seeds are available.

    $8 for 6ct 5 gal Smart Pot knockoff

  • Do their job, hold up well. I cut the handles off to make watering under the scrog easier.

    $40 - Soil: Two bags of Happy Frog purchased from the local grow store. Ocean forest was sitting around.

    $7 for 30ct Starter grow bags

  • Do not recommend, breathe terribly, water stagnates even with modifications. Had to feed lightly and often, and really monitor dampness. Needed these for the outdoor garden anyways)

    $14 - Scrog net: I believe it was a 25 or a 50ft roll of 1"x1" plastic garden fencing from Home Depot.

  • Unfortunately I can't find a link but it's pretty common. I cut out the middles to make them 2"x2" openings, 1x1 seems very difficult to work with and would block a lot of light.


    Nutrients

    $100: Cyco 1 Litre Bottles

  • I have a local grow shop that I purchased a lot of these from. The 1 litre Cyco nutrient bottles ranged from $10-$18 and I have 7 different nutrients, call it $100

  • Vegetative State: Grow A & B + Dr. Repair + Silica

  • Flowering State: Bloom A & B + Potash Plus (+ Dr Repair and Silica every other feeding)

    $20: Key To Life - Uptake

  • Great for calcium uptake. Was told that this could basically replace calmag.

    $45 Cyco Grow XL Super Phosphoric Acid

  • Definitely an 'extra', not cheap for 100ml but I think the potential yield improvement from this phosphorous bomb will cover that cost, especially over 3-4 grows which I expect to get out of the bottle. Also states it helps with Fe, N and K uptake.



    Miscelaneous Stuff:

    $15 - random stuff from Walmart, etc.
  • Eyedroppers, duct tape, zip ties

    $6 Spray Bottles

  • Did not use these much, only very early during transplanting



    So to total that all out we're looking just over $1000 that I spent.

  • Could have kept it under $950 if I had not purchased the small duct fan or dehumidifier.
  • Also: Soil and nutrients for $205. Could work that down to under $150 by dropping a couple unnecessary yet desirable nutrients.


u/ThePienosaur · 11 pointsr/ballpython

Red light isn't good, you'll want a heat mat (MAKE SURE you have a thermostat for it or it will get too hot) and possibly a ceramic heat emitter (also needs a thermostat) for air heat. What are the temps and humidity and how do you measure them? Glass tanks usually don't hold humidity well and often aren't good for bps. You need at least 2 good hides, one for each side. They should be snug and enclosed with only one opening, preferably identical, half logs don't work.

Someone should come by with a really good care sheet, read it, it has some great info. I know this might be a lot of information, but having a good setup is important and will save you headaches in the future.

Edit: I found the care sheet. Credit to u/_ataraxia.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/skittlekitteh · 2 pointsr/snakes

Here's u/ataraxia's classic link dump I found on a other post. Although the informstion is written for bps (most common snake people have trouble with it seems- mostly due to the humedity) but the suggestions could definitely help you for the humedity aspect needed for your boa.


You should definitely read it through.

i'm going to dump a bunch of helpful links on you. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Cadder-12 · 6 pointsr/ballpython

I highly recommend you read the below information. Guaranteed that you'll be completely redoing your set up after reading all of this.

Credit: u/_ataraxia

The first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. Read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry, due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. Wood enclosures can also be suitable, if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. I'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.

    If you set up a good enclosure, and the temperatures and humidity are correct with no special treatment, the most work you need to do is feed every 1-2 weeks, spot clean the substrate and clean the water dish as needed [once or twice a week], and do a full enclosure cleaning every 1-6 months.
u/AutoModerator · 1 pointr/ballpython


I am a bot programmed to automatically provide the following content by /u/_Ataraxia when summoned. Link to the most recent version of this content here

The first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions. Let /u/_Ataraxia know if any of the links don't work.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

Ball Python Care Guides

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems

    Set-up Recommendations

  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. some popular brands include animal plastics [most recommended], boaphile plastics [i personally have these and like them], reptile basics, and vision cages, though you'll find many more with a quick google search. many people will use a tub at first and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter[CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as pro products [most recommended] or reptile basics.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.

    Copypasta version 7/24/2018 (c) /u/_Ataraxia

    I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.
u/beefjeeef · 9 pointsr/snakes


First of all. It's very good you recognize that you need help in learning how to care for the snake.

Second, here is a big link dump created by another regular user u/_ataraxia all credit for this goes to her.

the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Vaporhead · 8 pointsr/snakes

u/ataraxia has amazing information for ball pythons. You should definitely read it through. Glass tanks are not ideal for Bps, so this should help. Here is her normal dump of information I took from another post.

i'm going to dump a bunch of helpful links on you. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/rollapoid · 3 pointsr/ballpython

Reposting the famous u/ _ataraxia info:

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Keifru · 13 pointsr/Sneks

Sounds like you were getting outdated or flat-out incorrect information and those 'experienced snake owners' are likewise misinformed. There are very few snakes that legitimately have evolved to thrive on sand-based substrate (irony being the Sand Boa is not one of them; they live in sandy soil which is very different composition than straight sand). The Ball Python is native to the svannah/jungles of Sub-Saharan Africa. Its dirt, soil, and burrows. Not a majority or even significant amount of sand.

Additionally, if I extrapolate correctly from this singular picture, your BP is also in a glass enclosure and has a log-style hide. The former makes keeping humidity in the 55~80% range a difficult exercise, and the latter, is a stressor as BPs do best with a hide that has a single-entrance or is cave-like; the more points of contact, the better, and a single entrance means they can feel safer.

I'm going to steal _ataraxia's ball python dump and toss it below:

i'm going to dump a bunch of links to get you on the right track. the first three links are detailed care sheets, the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Optimoprimo · 1 pointr/aquaponics

I have a system similar to what you're describing, I posted it a while back here.

I have changed things recently, and maybe I can share with you some of the mistakes I made so you can avoid them. Firstly, you want a way to divide your flow and control it with ball valves. This is a great cheap pump on amazon. I know it seems like the gallons per hour are high, and with a small system that becomes an issue. If flow is too disruptive in your tank, your fish aren't happy. If flow is too high in your tiny grow bed, your plants aren't happy. I split the flow from my pump to divert some of it to two media beds and a third directly back into my tank. The splitting system was made of PVC and ball valves. It was the only way to reduce the flow rate so it wasn't crazy disruptive. A timer only costs about 10 USD and 15 min intervals really do help, even for an ornamental tank. I'd also recommend a bell siphon just because they're cool and can be made small. It helps your roots breathe.


I have aggressive filtration; small systems are very delicate and temperamental. Having lots of physical and biological filtration helps with this. I have an under gravel filter and also made a small canister filter that I run the water through before the media bed; you can make one out of anything water-tight. This provides a bit more water for your system and more aggressive filtration. Mine is full of filter mesh and bucky balls. I found that without this pre-filter, my media was getting disgusting within a few months.


My cheap fluorescent light worked like crap. You just can't grow things with anything but a good window or a good grow light. Amazon occasionally has great deals on lights, like this one. The T5's are great for little indoor systems.


Using clear acrylic tubing was stupid. It ended up with so much growth it gummed up everything. It also leaked like crazy everywhere even with hose clamps because it wasn't really made for any pressure. Use cheap black vinyl pond tubing like this. It's made specifically for this purpose and doesn't cost much more.


Heating a small system like this is a pain in the ass. I had a heater that was rated for 30 gallons, a heater in my canister, and it still couldn't keep up. Because there's so little water, as your water recirculates, it cools to room temp quickly. This makes your fish have to deal with constant temp fluctuations, which is stressful for them. You can get expensive line heaters on top of a heater for each tank, keep the room your tank is in at 24 degrees C, or just use cold water fish. I'd recommend the latter unless you have a good budget.


Finally, you still want to follow the general rules of aquarium keeping. Cichlids have no business in a 10 gallon tank, its way too small for them. Also an ideal pH for plants is ~6.8, so you need fish that are pH tolerant. I'm a little more lenient about goldfish and personally feel you can put 1-2 in a 10 gallon if you know how to keep your water chemistry happy. Goldfish police in this sub will tell you otherwise. That's up to your own opinion and research. Many people like to plant their ornamental AP tank, which is fine as long as they don't suck up all the nutrients and leave your herbs with nothing. I got rid of that second tank up top because I was naively hoping to use it as a little DWC area, but it became more hassle than it was worth for 4 net cups. I now have a 10 gallon tote, which is about the size you would want for your growbed as well. Fill it as high as you can to give your plants maximum root space.

u/ChristianCuber · 2 pointsr/hermitcrabs

OK, Im just going to list a bunch of stuff I've purchased through this process. Nothing is in any particular order.

Almond leaves (for tannin) - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LKTX4VC/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Moss - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0035Q65TQ/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Cholla Wood - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01H4FUMHY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Dried red Shrimp (Protein and Chitin) - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0027JCRVW/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Instant Ocean (1/3cup per Gallon) - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000255NKA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Ultrasonic Mister/Fogger (for DIY Fogger) - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PAK21WU/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Digital Temp Humidity Controller - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01I6BZ2IO/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

LED White/Blue Light - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0191EWII2/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

UTH (You may need to get a different size and this isn't the most recommended, but it works for me currently) - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00TR4HLEI/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1 (This one has adhesive on the back of it, so you just stick it on like a sticker.)

Cork Bark Board - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0019J1VPY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s04?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Water Conditioner - https://www.amazon.com/Seachem-116043304-Prime-500ml/dp/B00025694O

If you have any questions, please feel free. To mitigate confusion I felt just listing this as a reference first is the best approach. If you are looking for a new tank so that you can get friends, i would suggest 30 or more gallons and work towards that instead of investing into the current tank which would get changed.

Personally with the 5 i have i clearly see they need much more room than the 15 gallon they have now. I am in the process of acquiring an 85-120 gallon tank for permanency. These guys can live 20+ years with the proper care and environment. but not everyone has that freedom. 30 is a totally doable size for 3 crabs. they can grow to jumbos and be fine in there, but im sure if they reach that stage you'll be looking for another tank. Jumbos need at least 12" of substrate for molting.

u/birdsbirdsbirdsbirds · 8 pointsr/ballpython

There are some things in your description that could be cause for concern. I'm going to address specific details in your post, and include a link at the end. Please make sure you read through the link at the end!

First, is your heat pad hooked up to a thermostat? If not, unplug it and do not use it until you have a thermostat. A thermostat is even more essential than a thermometer. An unregulated heat pad is dangerous. Do NOT use a heat pad without a thermostat, or you risk serious burns to your snake! Two inexpensive models are InkBird and Jumpstart/Hydrofarm.

Thermometers and humidity gauges are also very important. Ball Pythons have specific heat and humidity needs. They will reject food, get sick, or have bad sheds if their temperatures and humidity are not on-par. Don't wait on this! And don't waste your time on analog dials. Start with an inexpensive digital thermometer/hygrometer to make sure your conditions are accurately monitored.

Neither the "daytime" nor the "infrared" lights are really appropriate. Snakes can see the light from both. You want a bulb that can be left on overnight without bothering the snake. Plus ambient light from a window is usually enough unless your room is particularly dark. Ditch both of your current heat lights and get a single Ceramic Heat Emitter bulb instead. It emits heat, but no light, and can be left running 24/7. ALSO get a lamp dimmer for your heat lamp, so you can more specifically control its heat output.

Next, ball pythons really should have two hides, one on the hot side and one on the cool so they don't have to sacrifice feeling safe to thermoregulate. Please get a second hide!

Now, with those specifics addressed, I highly recommend you read the following link dump by _Ataraxia. She did a good job compiling the most common advice on this sub. Pay special attention to those care sheets - read them all the way through.

You'll likely find things about your current enclosure (like aspen, which has a tendency to mold and doesn't retain humidity well) aren't quite appropriate for proper ball python care. We're here to help you and provide recommendations to ensure the long, happy life of your new scaly friend.

u/AwkwardMunchkin · 2 pointsr/ballpython

u/_ataraxia has a lot of good information. I've stolen their list of links and information for you to go through, but all the credit for this belongs to them. (Also I don't know how to embed links into the comments since I'm a reddit noob so please excuse the messiness)

the first three links are detailed care sheets, the rest are product recommendations in case you need to get any supplies yourself.

http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding

spyder robotics (http://www.spyderrobotics.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=1) makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. https://www.amazon.com/MTPRTC-ETL-Certified-Thermostat-Germination-Reptiles/dp/B000NZZG3S/ is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat.

heat tape (http://www.reptilebasics.com/heat-tape) or ultratherm heat pads (http://www.reptilebasics.com/ultratherm-heat-pads) are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options.

a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer (https://www.amazon.com/AcuRite-00891A3-Outdoor-Thermometer-Humidity/dp/B001BO8CUE/) allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].

an infrared thermometer (https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/) allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.

these hide boxes (http://www.reptilebasics.com/hide-boxes) are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.

edit: Just fixed some formatting to make it easier to read.

u/lapagecp · 4 pointsr/snakes

Ok I will give tips in the order you presented the info.

>40 gallon tank.

This could be a bit on the large side for your snake so I would start by blacking out the back and sides. You can do this with construction paper, foamcore board, or spray paint if you have someplace else for the snake to live for at least a few days. Pet stores usually sell a scenery backer meant for this. Doing this will make the snake feel less out in the open and thus safer.

>Aspen bedding

I get my aspen bedding from tractor supply in a big bail. You might consider trying coco husk which will help with keeping humidity up.

> 1 hide

I would have 2 identical tight fitting hides (This is how tight they should be)so that your snake can thermo regulate without prioritizing safety.

> 2 branches

Make sure these are secure and won't fall over.

> and a sugar skull for design

Cool.

>Have a UTH because ive heard those are best forglass tanks.

These are great for many setups but you should have temperature controlled. I recommend a thermostat. Here is a cheap one. You should place the probe on the inside against the glass or you can place it under the UTH if you have an infared thermometer to check your glass temp. remember to point the these thermometer directly at the glass from the top straight down. You must shoot perpendicular to the surface you are measuring.

> Havent fed him yet because he was fed before I bought him.

That's good. I would give him a week and offer a rat that is 10% of the snakes weight. If the snake will eat frozen thawed I recommend that. I would feed every 7 to 10 days at that size. I would thaw the rodent in hot (not boiling) water in a ziplock bag until you are sure the rodent is thawed in the center. The ziplock bag is to keep the rodent dry so you can feed in your snakes enclosure. You don't want substrate to stick to the rodent and it will be fine if its dry and you supervise the feeding.

> Whats a good way to control humidity?? Having a hard time keeping it steady.

Try covering most of the screen top. You don't need that much ventilation as your snake won't be soiling its bedding regularly. You will spot clean any problems and so you can get away with much less airflow then with rodents. Here is a tutorial if you want to do it up nice. Adjust how much ventilation you have until you get the right humidity. On that note I like this for a thermostat/hygrometer.

>And should I have a heat lamp ?

I would not use a heat lamp unless you need it to keep a warm side of 90F under the hide and an ambient temp of 80F. A heat lamp will suck humidity out of the air.

u/MoonKnightFan · 5 pointsr/Homebrewing

Without a doubt it is my Counterpressure Bottle Filler. I hate bottling, and almost exclusively Keg these days. However, sometimes A beer turns out so well I want to either save a couple bottles for later, or bring it to people who won't be drinking it quickly enough for a growler to be reasonable. Option one was to bottle while kegging and bottle condition. The problems with this involve A) Not knowing if your beer is great yet, possibly wasting time. B) Having to clean the bottles and bottling equipment along with kegging equipment, adding time. C) Having trube build up during bottle conditioning, contributing to off flavors for long aging. D) unavoidable high DO / Oxygen levels in the bottles, also causing oxidization and other off flavors after long periods of sitting. The counter pressure filler allows me to bottle beers directly from a carbonated keg. The bottles are cold and carbonated immediately. But more importantly, allowing you to cap on foam like at most craft breweries, you can insure very low DO levels. Combined with the lack of trub, your bottles are likely to age very well for archival purposes. And for people asking, whats the best reason to save a good beer? Well, if you are trying to perfect a recipe, being able to sample the last several batches with your current one together really helps point out what your method changes do to your beer quality.


Another important purchase from the last few months is a combo of these two items: Faucet line Jumper and Submersible Pump. I use these in combination to clean my beer lines. I have a twin faucet tower kegerator. I keep two kegs on, and when they both cash, i clean my lines. I disconnect the line from my first keg, and attach it to this submersible pump, which is sitting in a gallon of caustic liquid line cleaner (from five star, but PBW would work too). I use the Faucet jumper to connect the ends of both faucets, and I disconnect the line from keg 2, and have it dump back into the bucket. What i have created is a recirculation that I let run for 30 minutes. It doesn't need to be supervised. This is so much better than how I used to do it, which was using a squeeze bottle and doing one faucet at a time. It took forever, and required me to be there. This new solution allows me to walk away and let it do its thing. Furthermore, I also use this time to defrost my kegerator if it needs it.


Edit: I would like to add that I think this might be the most interesting and useful post on this sub in a long time, good job OP. I have spent quite a lot of time googling other peoples purchases, some I haven't heard of, and am planning some purchases.