Reddit mentions: The best pet supplies

We found 42,736 Reddit comments discussing the best pet supplies. We ran sentiment analysis on each of these comments to determine how redditors feel about different products. We found 13,159 products and ranked them based on the amount of positive reactions they received. Here are the top 20.

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u/salire · 53 pointsr/TheGirlSurvivalGuide

Your questions aren't silly! It's great that you're thinking about how you can make you both comfortable before you dive into a new situation. Always set yourself up for success! :)

> do I buy a litter box/food/scratch-post before I plan to bring a cat home?

That's generally a good idea, yes. Means less stress for both of you as you're scrambling to get everything ready for him. You might ask the shelter what food the cat has been eating, as cats can get an upset tummy when switching brands/types. Not a big deal, but he will have poops that are a bit stinkier/liquidier than normal poops. That should alleviate within the week. You can lessen the tummy troubles by doing a more gradual change, mixing the food he is currently on with the food he will be on more and more, until he is eating what you want him on. But you can honestly just do the change, too, and just deal with the sadpoops for a little while.

I suggest a couple of different scratching posts, if you have the space! Cats like having options, like a horizontal post and a vertical one. Cats also like being high up, so if you can swing a tall post with platforms, he will probably like that.

Get two litter boxes! A lot of people don't realize it, but the rule of thumb for number of litters you should have is NumberOfCats + 1. So, 1 cat + 1 = 2 boxes. Clean them often. Cats are very clean creatures (especially compared to dogs) and are MUCH more likely to have accidents when they feel they do not have a better option than peeing in your bed. That's not their fault. You wouldn't want to step on your own pee/poop either! If you have problems with litter getting kicked out of the box, a litter mat can be helpful.

> Do I need to buy a carrier for the cat?

Yep. You'll eventually need to take him to a vet in all likelihood, and a carrier will make that so much easier, as most cats despise the car. I recommend a hard carrier. The softer ones seem nicer in general, but the hard carriers are easier to clean out, and you never know how a cat will be in the car until... well. They're in it. One of our cats poops and pees every. single. time. So he always gets the hard carrier.

> Should I contact a vet before I get the cat?

The shelter might require you to have a vet already, so I'd probably at least pick one out from google search. They might require you to go get a checkup, but probably not. That's more of a rescue thing, I think. Most shelters have their own in-house vet, so it's not really necessary. Don't be afraid to contact the shelter if he seems to be coughing and wheezing. Upper respiratory infections are very common in shelter environments due to the crowded nature of them, but they are also very treatable, and the shelter will be able to give you medication for him.

> How do I train a cat?

Someone mentioned Jackson Galaxy, who I generally agree is pretty good for training if you have some problems. But most of the time, cats are pretty out-of-the-box ready pets. That is to say, if you have an environment that is good for cats (where you let them have some space, where you don't make a huge amount of loud noise, where they aren't prodded and poked at constantly), they generally don't need training. We've fostered tiny kittens that automatically knew how to use the litter box. We also have boy cats who were not fixed until well into adulthood and have never had problems spraying.
It's instinct to go in the box, especially once they're fixed and don't need to mark territory really.

> For those of you who own a cat/cats, any advice for this first-timer?

Give both of you time to get to know each other. Don't force it. He will come to you, given time and space, and you'll be able to cultivate a better relationship built on trust and mutual respect if he knows that you won't force him to do things that he doesn't want to do (especially at first--think about it like building a friendship with a person; you would trust your friends to do things that you would never trust a stranger to do, and it's the same for him).

Cooing and gentle words are generally pretty good for coaxing, as is letting him smell your hand/something that smells like you before you approach for pets. Think about it like introducing yourself. You wouldn't go up to someone you didn't know well and just touch them without at least saying hi.

Every cat I have ever known, male or female, fixed or not, will pee in a pile of anything if it is left long enough. They see it as 'trash,' and I think it just registers as litter. So, if you are the type to leave clothes on the floor... I would try to stop that.

Keep nails trimmed. Scratching posts are for sharpening nails, which is an instinct that they have to fulfill, and you're giving them an outlet for. Some people think it's for 'filing' the nails down, but it's not. It's for keeping them sharp enough to get prey. You'll have to trim them.

And this is just my own personal opinion, but... young--but not kitten--boy cats are best for first timers. I have one girl, and I absolutely adore her, but she is very high maintenance/prissy/touchy, whereas my three boys are all pretty chill. Each cat is different though, so obviously your mileage may vary! It's just something I've noticed in general in my time of owning and fostering cats, that boys are more laid back/forgiving than girls (and thus I think a little easier for a first timer). Young adults are also great for first timers because you have less accidents (though that's generally not a big concern anyway) and they're more able to be on their own for longer periods of time. Older adults/seniors are great too if you want a really, really chill, more stand-offish cat, or if you want a cat that you'll have for <10 years, but if you want a little more energy and time, a cat that's about 1-2 years old is a GREAT way to go.

Some toys that are great for cats include the classic laser pointer, the feather toy, catnip toys, and crinkle balls.

Cats prefer to drink away from where they eat, so place his food bowl and his water bowl apart from one another! Some cats also prefer running water to still water, so if you notice your cat likes drinking out of the faucet (or if you just want to spoil your cat like I spoil mine...) you can get a water fountain for him!

Finally, if it's not working out for some reason, like your personalities just don't mesh well... take him back. I know it sounds hard, but it's best for him if he is in an environment where he is understood and his needs are met. There's no sense in forcing both of you to be miserable. Some shelters let you do a foster-to-adopt sort of thing, where you sort of try each other out for a bit. I like this option, because you hope for the best, but it feels a little bit easier to tap out if you need to. Either way, there's no shame in tapping out. Sometimes things just don't work the way you thought they would.

Sorry for the novel, but I wanted to be as thorough as I could. My parents recently got their first cat, and it's been... an ordeal for them, getting used to it.
It's great that you have some experience with cats though, so I think you'll be fine! Seriously, cats are sort of the next level up from a goldfish as far as easiness. Should be fine.

I hope you and your new furbaby are super, super happy together! :)

u/Dd7990 · 2 pointsr/bettafish

Unfortunately a 10g tank is far too small for any additional fish tankmates to be with a betta, but you can have some shrimp OR snails in the 10g as tankmates with the betta. If you really want to do a community tank, the minimum recommended tank size is 15g, but 20g or larger would be best for that.

Keep in mind, bettas DO NOT NEED to have tankmates, they are very territorial and aggressive fish. Most bettas will see tankmates as "intruders" to their territory; though a more docile betta will tolerate these "intruders" better than more aggressive bettas. Only rarely do you get lucky with a betta that has the personality of actually liking their tankmates, that is not the norm for most of our domestic betta splendens.

Tetras are nippy fish and although some people do keep them with bettas, they're not an ideal tankmate + they need a minimum of 15+ and must have at least a 20g for that many of them to be with a betta. https://www.fishkeepingworld.com/neon-tetra/ - Exerpt: "These fish should generally be kept in schools with at least 15 members. Smaller schools than this can feel threatened and this can cause stress... If you’re planning to keep a school of them, you should keep at least 15-20 of them. An aquarium that is at least 20 gallons is needed for this number of them."

Please see our community guidelines for compatible betta tankmates per tank size: https://www.reddit.com/r/bettafish/wiki/tankmates

Please do thorough research on the needs of each species of tankmate(s) before you consider if they are a good fit for your betta/tank-size. Cories need minimum 6 of their own kind for best results, and they like to roam around so do need the space to be able to do so (20g and up is best, 15g at the absolute minimum) + sand-type substrate is gentler on their barbels (whiskers) vs gravel types. Also don't cram in too many fish or different kinds of fish, research stocking limits for the size of tank. As I said before, the 10g can humanely house 1 betta + a few shrimp or snails, no other fish.

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PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE!!! FISHLESS CYCLE, before you get the betta or any tankmates: The Nitrogen Cycle and the Fishless Cycle - getting your aquarium ready for fish - INJAF

I'd recommend Seachem Stability over other brands of beneficial bacteria, you need to shake it well before each use and add 2 capfuls per day (for a week or more) while cycling your aquarium, especially if you did any water change.

I also highly recommend the API Freshwater Master Test Kit so you're able to accurately check your ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate during the process of cyling + afterwards for routine maintenance purposes.

https://www.amazon.com/API-FRESHWATER-800-Test-Freshwater-Aquarium/dp/B000255NCI/ <--- ABSOLUTELY MUST HAVE, VERY IMPORTANT, liquid water parameters test kit. Three main things to check every-other-day: Ammonia, Nitrite, and Nitrate. Not cycled will read 0 Ammonia, 0 Nitrite, 0 Nitrate. Cycling in progress will read some ammonia and/or some nitrite, but little or no nitrate. Fully Cycled will read 0 Ammonia, 0 Nitrite, and 5-10 ppm of Nitrate, then when nitrate reaches 15-20 ppm in a cycled tank a water change is necessary to reduce said nitrates.

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As for Tank stuff:

I'd recommend a Sponge Filter setup over a HoB filter, because HoB tend to have a strong outflow which bettas don't like (and the one you got looks like it will be especially strong in the 10g tank since it's meant for a 20g).

Here's my favorite sponge filter setup which I use in my own 5.5g tanks (they're rated for up to 20g and are nice compact sponge filters, so do not take away much space from your tank).

https://www.amazon.com/Powkoo-Double-Biochemical-Aquarium-Gallons/dp/B01M3VALFU/ My bettas (and I) LOVE LOVE LOVE THIS!!!

AND from Petsmart - I HIGHLY recommend the TopFin Quartz BioBalls ceramic filter media, the rounded pearl shape makes them fit a lot more into a small space such as the dual-media chambers in the sponge filter I highly recommended above. It looks like this in store: https://i.imgur.com/Xz50k5F.jpg (I think it's not yet listed on their website because the stuff is still a new release).

https://www.amazon.com/U-picks-Aquarium-Gallon-Quietest-Accessories/dp/B07RRNDMXJ/ Nice air pump with all accessories to set it up - quiet mini air pump, check valve, and airline tubing.

See it all in action: https://i.imgur.com/KAyjMaj.mp4 (not my tank but my friends when she was fishless cycling hers, and the sponge filter is nicely visible. Mine is hidden behind bunch of silk plants :< lol)

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The Aqueon Pro adjustable 100w heater would be a bit much for a 10g unless you live in a particularly cold climate or keep the room at a chilly temperature, otherwise you would be fine with the Aqueon Pro adjustable 50w heater for a 10g tank - per the rule of thumb "5 watts of heater power per gallon" which is sufficient in most cases, except if living in a cold climate and/or the room where the tank is being kept is especially chilly.

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Tetra brand betta pellets are CHOCK-FULL-O-CRAP-FILLERS - this is terrible quality betta food...

NorthFin Betta Bits, Fluval/Nutrafin Bug Bites, and New Life Spectrum Betta are HIGH quality betta pellets with good ingredients and little or none of the bad filler crap or nasty preservatives.

Hikari Bloodworms are great as a treat/diet variety as they add vitamins to their bloodworms, and ZooMed Betta Dial-A-Treat is nice for a 3-in-1 treat wheel container.

I'd recommend getting at least two different brands of the pellets I linked below + some variety of treats like bloodworms, mysis shrimp, brine shrimp, and daphnia. Alternate them day by day, meal by meal or otherwise mix them up such that the betta isn't always eating only the same thing day in and day out for every single meal.

- https://www.amazon.com/Northfin-Food-Betta-Pellet-Package/dp/B00M4Q5DQ4/ <-- my favorite go-to betta pellet

- https://www.amazon.com/New-Life-Spectrum-Betta-70g/dp/B077MG4JR2/

- https://www.amazon.com/Fluval-A6577-Tropical-Granules-Medium/dp/B07194GD1F/

- Bloodworms with vitamins added: https://www.amazon.com/Hikari-Bio-Pure-Freeze-Dried-0-42-Ounce/dp/B00025K1GQ/

- ZooMed Betta Dial-A-Treat is a decent 3-in-1 treat wheel container which has 3 different treats for betta diet variety. https://www.amazon.com/Zoo-Med-Laboratories-AZMBP5-0-12-Ounce/dp/B003ZWCTZO/

- You can also try adding a vitamin drops to the food AND tank water - VitaChem Freshwater - Vitamin drops for aquatic animals - REFRIGERATION needed after first use/opening, to keep the liquid vitamin drops fresh. https://www.amazon.com/Boyd-Enterprises-ABE16708-Freshwater-Vitachem/dp/B00BS96V78

Beware of overfeeding, which is equally bad for bettas as underfeeding (they are gluttons and would eat till they burst if given the chance) https://i.imgur.com/4RR2LZ9.jpg. (save this pic for reference, feed betta as much as makes his belly match between 1st and 2nd photo, then let him digest back down to a normal belly before feed again.)

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Again, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE... FISHLESS CYCLE before you get a betta or any tankmates, I cannot stress the importance of that enough. The Nitrogen Cycle and the Fishless Cycle - getting your aquarium ready for fish - INJAF

u/davidrools · 42 pointsr/AskReddit

I rescued a german shepherd mix when he was about 2 months old and he just turned 2 years! He's awesome!

Join /r/dogs for great community, support, and advice.

Here are some of my dog's favorites if you're lost on what to Wishlist on Amazon:


  • Hands down the best ball for fetch, if he likes fetch
  • And the launcher I like this one b/c you can just throw it in a backpack and it'll zip all the way closed (I like to keep a backpack w/ my dog's park toys, some treats, poop bags, wet ones/purell, and his shot records) The best thing about the chuck-it is that you don't have to pick up a slobbery ball.
  • Three very good chew bones
  • Advantage Multi if you're not often taking him onto tick-heavy hikes. If you need tick control, get Frontline and Interceptor for heartworm.
  • The best dog frisbee and I've tried a half dozen. Doesn't fly the best, but it's the most durable, safe, and flies great with a little practice.
  • This Car seat cover is great
  • Flexi leash is really handy when used appropriately.
  • Poo bags can never have enough of. and you go through them pretty quick.
  • Dog backpack great for burning off energy on walks/hikes, and makes them feel like they're doing an important job! I have this one in black. works great.
  • Collapsible water bowl handy for hikes/camping/outings
  • european style leather lead (leash) I'm preferential to the feel of leather for leashes/collars. And the european is absolutely the best - adjustable length and super easy to tether them to a pole/fence if you're eating outdoors or running into a store or something (of course use common sense when doing this!)
  • Harness I'm not a fan of harnesses - they're annoying to put on/take off and just encourage a dog to pull more. But if you want him to pull, towing you on a skateboard or something (my dog loves this) then it's great
    Furminator GSD mixes don't need regular brushing, but this one works great for shedding season
    Dremel for nail trimming GSD = black nails, a bit trickier to trim. I use this with lots of treats to put a nice round edge and take off a bit of length of my dog's nails. works good but get him accustomed to it slowly and with lots of treats. Pretty soon he won't mind.
    *Zukes are great treats for training
  • Bowls that don't tip over. Easy to wash. can't break. My pick.
  • Big crate I use for vacations when I bring my dog but need to leave him in a hotel room or something. It's big and bulky but I like to give him room to move around comfortably.
  • A good shampoo I like hydrosurge unscented but it's not on Amazon =\
  • deodorizer I give my dog a little spritz between baths if he starts to get funky
  • A shower head like this makes bathing super painless. I just bring my dog in the shower w/ me along with some treats and it's quick and easy.
  • a scrubber like this gets my dog cleaner than I can with my hands. I found one at petco I like


    Wow I kind of didn't realize I have so much shit for my dog. But he's family so...anyway. Also costco has great beds for $20ish (comparably $80+ from a petstore) They also carry Frontline, lots of treats (buscuits, duck breast jerkey - the best!) good food (Iams ProActive goes on sale once in a while, and they also carry Natures Domain salmon/sweet potato food that's really good).
u/imalittlepiggy · 2 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

YAY! I love cats, and am commonly described as "a cat lady" if that helps you take my suggestions a little seriously... hehe.

First I recommend figuring out the species of the cat, and look up personality traits of them. Sometimes cats are super attention whorey and some keep to themselves mostly. Just be prepared for whatever yours is, and don't try to force it to be otherwise. Not that you would, of course, but yeah.

My cats loooooooove to play with balls. More so than cat-nip mice and stuff. They like the little tennis balls and basketballs (those are made out of the stress-ball type material) and they like them because they can use their claws to throw it around! Also any wand, but they looove feathers. My cat will eat rubber bands so she's not allowed to play with them. Make sure to keep an eye on what she eats/plays with! Also they love the sit n spin it seriously is their favorite. Our cats also love bags of all types, and boxes of course, but I think they just like small spaces. We usually keep a few of these tent like things around, the ones we get at walmart are less than five dollars and usually last a few months before being destroyed.

Some cats really like to climb or be up high. You just gotta let them. Usually if you have a few spots they can get at, they'll keep away from the no-no zones. Try not to punish the cat for doing cat-things. It's sad when I see friends who I thought were great with animals yell at their cats for just doing their thing. I also recommend getting a specific scratchy thingy for her, whether it's just the cheapo cardboard ones (as low as $3 at walmart) or a fancy pants tree thingy. But usually if they have a designated space they won't scratch much else. If they do instead of spraying them with a waterbottle, pick them up and place them in front of/on their designated scratcher. That's the best way they learn that.

Also cats don't respond well to being punished like dogs do. They don't understand that their actions correlate with what you're upset about. They just think you get scary is all. The best way to "punish" a cat or "train" it to not scratch/swipe/bite is to blow in their face. It's not super threatening but will establish you as Alpha (they do have a "pecking order") and it won't scare them like yelling does. My cat was abused and a little shit to people, but in less than a year she shaped up with the blowing on her face thing. She responds well to it now still, and she's warmed up to people. I recommend you make sure everyone who visits your house knows your rules on how to treat the cats- I've yelled at people before for fucking with my kitties too much, that's how cats get mean!!

Also the cat will probably take some time to get used to you. Don't push it. That's the best way to become besties really fast! Let her come to you, let her decide when she's done being pet or sitting in your lap. It'll build trust between you too. :) And also be careful with picking her up, some cats hate it (my bf's cat haaaates it, when he was a kitten my bf's friends wouldn't let him escape so now he freaks out every time someone grabs him. Definitely should not do that haha).

Also be wary that cats are suuuper allergic to garlic. Therefore people food is extremely dangerous to them. Chocolate doesn't really bother them, but most cats won't eat it. Also lots and lots of cats don't actually like fish or tuna flavors! My kitty only eats chicken flavor treats, but she'll drink the water from a tuna can (not the meat, she's weird) so just be watchful when you start buying her food. They won't eat if they don't like it. Little shits (hehehhehe) Also along that topic, they have super super sensitive tummies and often puke just from eating too fast! So be careful of that too hehe. But treats and nip will make the kitty know you're someone to warm up to really fast, hehe. Even if it doesn't seem like it at first and is shy from you. Also try and get it in the same room as you when you feed it for the first bit, they'll realize you control food then too.

Only other thing I can think of is to "cat-proof" your house. My kitty tears up anything paper, including my ex roommates homework if left out, toilet paper, newspapers, posters, etc. Bf's cat just lays on paper but they both have eaten through plastic bags and attempt to open cupboards and doors, we had to get child locks for our pantry. Consider those things and remember a cat is ornery and mischievous so don't get too mad at it for it's nature. (once again, not that you will, but sometimes people forget!) just blow on it and get it away from the area it's been naughty in if it does get into something. Also if it's a boy and it sprays, ask your vet what you can do to help that. Some cats are hopeless once they start, but some only react when upset/nervous/sad/scared/angry. Also, clean the litterbox as much as possible. even with one cat everyday is best, but every other day or every three days can be enough. cats will poop on the floor only as a last resort, but will as opposed to a messy litterbox. maybe consider even getting two boxes if you have the space! to cut back on smell use extra baking soda in the litter, clean often, and get the tall box covers for the litter boxes. my cats won't poop without them too, they like the privacy as well hehe.

Really cats that young adjust well, and once you build trust they should be pretty great little friends. You should like you're totally set for this, I'm sure you'll be a great kitty mommy!! And holy WOW, Sorry that this is like a hundred years long.... I just really fucking love cats. Also watch "my cat from hell" because it's funny and usually you can learn a thing or two. Also doing any other research on cats/your cat is good. Of course. :) YAY HAPPY NEW KITTY BABY DAY FOR YOU!!!

u/redsharpie8 · 1 pointr/cats

I totally agree with TheCatGuardian's post. We just adopted our first cat from a shelter and he is 8 months old, and honestly he's still a bit of a handful at times (but that should be expected with any new pet). Try to get one over a year, if not closer to 2 years, as ours is still learning how to play nice and not nipping our ankles to get attention. My husband has always had cats, but this was my first pet and we adopted because I've always wanted one. I did a ton of research and here's what I would suggest as far as supplies:

A high sided litter box with rim - to keep them from kicking litter around and the high walls help keep everything inside. I didn't waste the money on litter liners. They seem gimmicky to me.

Pooper Scooper - It's cheap and gets the job done. Nothing else needs to be said about it.

Stainless Steel Bowl(s) - This one gets good reviews and is the perfect size for their food. You can get two, one for wet and one for dry food. Though I got this one for dry and got a cute oval dish at walmart for ~$2 for his wet. Whatever you want.

Slightly larger bowl for water - Make sure they have plenty for fresh water. I give him new water in the AM and evening after work. I know a lot of people rave about water fountains...but honestly I didn't want to spend the money initially, and my kitty seems to be perfectly fine drinking from the bowl. It'd be worth it to see how your cat feels about the bowl...esp since they will be drinking from bowls at the shelter...they shouldn't be too picky. You can spoil them later on if you decide to, but definitely not necessary.

A safety collar - Make sure it is either a break-away or elastic to ensure the cat doesn't get strangled if it climbs and gets stuck on something and is hanging by its neck. I liked this one because it didn't have an annoying bell, though some like the bell to let you find your cat in the house. The collar also ensure that if the cat gets out anyone who finds him will know he belongs to someone and isn't just a feral cat that they can take for themselves.

Scratching Board - Simple and good reviews. Seems like it will last. You can also get one or two cardboard cheaper ones and see what they prefer to scratch on. My cat doesn't really scratch that much...he uses the scratching posts that are part of his cat tree.

Cat Perch - This is the one we got so he can look out the window. It seems like a good balance of expense and functionality...especially at first. The cat might not even like jumping up on things, so at least this is a safe buy since it's not that tall but still lets them get up off the floor.

Cat bed - This one is highly reviewed and really durable. It's machine washable and will last forever. I really love this bed.

Simple toys at first: Wand Toy, Jingle Balls, Ball Circle Thing, Little Catnip Critter. He also likes paper bags, toilet paper rolls, and his laser pointer. I highly recommend the laser pointer...ours is green.

Greenies Treats

As far as food, you want to ask what they feed at the shelter and get a bag of that at first even if you read online that it isn't "the best." We wanted to get our cat on a mainly wet food diet, so we left his shelter dry food out at night, and gave him half a can of wet food in the morning before work, and half a can at night beofre bed ~9PM, and took the dry food away while the wet food was out. We feed him Friskies Pate...it's actually pretty good for the price. People will get passionate about cat food. Honestly Friskies is fine for us now...they sell it in bulk at Sam's.

Litter - you want to use the kind they use at the shelter so they have comfort in that. You can switch later if you want.

You might also want to get nail clippers and a brush. Our cat is long haired and I like using a comb, but it's really up to you.

As far as gimmicks I would assume that if it seems like a luxury it probably isn't necessary. Cats are very happy with simple things. The vitals are what I listed...a bathroom, food and water (bowls), a few toys, somewhere to scratch, somewhere to get up off the floor, and a safety collar. The bed isn't absolutely vital, but it's nice for them to have somewhere that they feel secure and happy...even if they don't use it at first.

u/theRacistEuphemism · 2 pointsr/Pets

Apologies in advance for the book.

It does sound like she's getting too big to manage herself - I know a cat like this, and getting that stimulation especially where she can't reach it in a spot that is already a sensitive sweet spot for cats probably elicits this overreaction (like she's SUPER overstimulated), and the cat I know has also overgroomed a spot she can reach to a bald patch, but not to the point of bleeding. This isn't so much behavioural as it is a reaction to her own condition, and it seems more physiological than anything else.

First thing is first: when is the last time both cats saw a vet? Do that first. You don't want to be making big changes in her life if she's not in a good place health-wise already. A vet will be able to suggest ways to manage this cat's weight by providing things like an ideal weight for you to strive for, to treat her bleeding and overgroomed areas, and if needed, give her a bath or a groom (or recommend someone who can). Ask about a good way to help her clean herself, like by wiping her down with a warm damp cloth and following it up with a thorough brush. If she has a tummy problem like diarrhea frequently, let them know because it may be something that needs addressing, even if it's as simple as changing her food or adding a probiotic to her diet/routine. Get blood tests done, and check the functionality of her thyroid.

I notice overweight cats tend to get greasier more easily because, as you said, they can't reach parts of themselves. I imagine any litter problems are exacerbated by her inability to groom herself back there too, which can also be quite problematic as they age.

What kind of diet are they on? If they eat a dry food diet, look to transitioning them to a wet food diet. Wet food is higher in moisture, higher in protein, and lower in carbohydrates. Carbs are a huge problem in fat cats because they come from sources like plants that cats aren't built to digest the same way they do meat, so avoid foods like Science Diet since I think all of their foods contain corn as a higher ingredient (meaning the protein it advertises it has comes from plants, so it's in one end and out the other, and the cat comes back hungry all the time). Super cheap brands will contain corn too, and other foods will contain some starches or grains - if you're on a budget, look for something like Sheba, Fancy Feast, Friskies, Authority in pate. Gravies and shredded foods contain more carbs because they need to thicken up the "sauces". You get more bang for your buck with pate, and having the water built right into the food helps satiate a cat's hunger better, as most cats will eat dry food and forgo water until they start feeling crappy. Generally cats don't drink enough water on their own.

For cats who need to lose weight, 18-20 calories per pound is a general guideline I've seen around (some say it's generous - you can ask the vet about this), but it's based on their ideal weight. If you're starting a diet, start at 1lb less than her current weight so it's not a total shock to her body, and then start working your way down to her ideal weight's caloric requirements. Most of the food I've come across, high end dry food is 116-120 calories per ounce and wet food is 28-30 calories per ounce. I have a food scale that helps make it easier to measure, but to give you a general estimate, one of those wide, round soup spoons heaping gives me 1.5 ounces of pate style food.

You can also work on feeding the other cat by himself, like in another room, or in a crawl space the female is too big to fit through. That way he always has the option, but she's limited to the food she gets in the wet meal feedings you give her.

Dashing from the litter box could also have something to do with where the box is set up. If you only have one litter box, get one or two more so the cats have the option to use a box that hasn't been soiled by the other recently, or so one isn't waiting outside or preparing to ambush the other. If something happened to spook her in there once, she could be afraid and may want to get out as fast as she can. When you get another litter box, place it in a different room and see how she takes to that one - keep the same type of litter so she still recognizes it as a litter box.

I don't mean to sound like a jerk saying this, but as someone with long hair, I've seen our cats hoover up a few of my hairs, which is pretty gross but just do your best to keep the place swept and vacuumed to best prevent her from accidentally ingesting long hairs.

When it comes to exercise, do you guys play with her frequently? The upside to working regular day jobs is that cats tend to be more active at night anyway, so she can nap while you're away and you can work her while you're home! Toys aren't fun to cats who are waiting for something to move that they can stalk and chase. Especially if she isn't big on going outside and exploring or chasing whatever's out there, you'll have to fill that gap here.

Laser pointers, Da Bird, other wand toys, and you can even improvise since cats will play with garbage if they think it's fun. I've had great success with small plastic pieces, like the caps holding the wand toys together, and just tossing them. My cat goes NUTS chasing them, making 6 foot leaps in the air just to catch it in her mouth or between her paws, and they do the same for dried out little pieces of black licorice. Straws? Our cats go wild for these Sproket straws that are at Pet Valu because they're woven and very bouncy, so the weave can catch in their claws and what they end up doing while they fling their paws around is tossing it around, so they go chase it again. If we're around, we bunch them up and let them fly for them to chase. Flouncy little springs?

If all else fails, get some healthy treats, even a high end, low-carb kibble that you can break into pieces and throw around the house so she'll have to chase it down if she wants to eat. The food I feed is 13% carbs and 48% protein - grain, soy, gluten, and byproduct free (though the last one isn't a huge deal to me - the others are). Cheap foods can be anywhere around 30-40% carbs. Drop those like rocks and find something better elsewhere.

Here are some links that will be helpful to you, but just a note that the first one tends to push towards raw diets. If your cats have lived on wet or dry all their lives, and especially if you don't have the time or money to dedicate the research towards committing and feeding raw, don't do it. Wet food is a better "biologically appropriate" compromise, which the author also thinks, but her stance is a bit strong towards raw.

http://www.catinfo.org/?link=felineobesity

http://www.catinfo.org/docs/FoodChartPublic9-22-12.pdf (a bit outdated, but still a good gauge)

http://fnae.org/carbcalorie.html

Good luck!

u/Ishikama · 1 pointr/bettafish

Good! They'll definitely need filters though, and that may be part of the problem. As for what kind to get, I'd recommend looking into sponge filters.
They're super easy to clean, cheap, and very reliable. They also hold a lot of good beneficial bacteria for your tank, which is great for your fishs health.

All you need for one is the sponge filter itself, some airline tubing, and an air pump. The sponge filter can usually be bought at local fish stores, or online, and the rest can be bought even at bug retailers like walmart or meijer. I'll link some amazon listings for visual reference, and find the best price I can too.

https://www.amazon.com/SLSON-Aquarium-Biochemical-Filtering-Gallons/dp/B07PF7T1QZ/ref=mp_s_a_1_25?keywords=sponge+filter&qid=1572619104&sprefix=sponge+&sr=8-25

https://www.amazon.com/Penn-Plax-Aquariums-Flexible-Standard/dp/B0002563MW/ref=mp_s_a_1_26?keywords=air+pump+aquarium&qid=1572619157&sprefix=air+pump&sr=8-26

https://www.amazon.com/Tetra-Whisper-Easy-Aquariums-Non-UL/dp/B0009YJ4N6/ref=mp_s_a_1_4?keywords=air+pump+aquarium&qid=1572619198&sprefix=air+pump&sr=8-4

To clean them, which you'll only need to do like maybe once or twice every few months, just fill up a clean bucket with your tank water while doing a water change, put sponge filter in the bucket, squeeze it out, put back in tank, done. No need to buy more cartridges either.

As for decor, I don't know what you've got, but if its artificial, plastic plants and hard decor with sharp points can also tear and rip your bettas fins. If you do artificial, I'd recommend soft silk or silicone plants. If I'm being honest though, I always recommend live plants over fake, but I know that's not much of a possibility for everyone.

If you do want to try live plants, some good beginner ones are anubias nana, anubias frazeri, and java fern. All of these plants do not get buried, and if they do, they will rot. They can be tied to surfaces, or can have a small rock tied to the bottom to make them sink, but they will root themselves.

Java moss is great for bettas, they'll love to sleep in it. Water lettuce is a really pretty floating plant too.

Lastly, I'd HIGHLY recommend doing some research on the nitrogen cycle. Since you're setting up brand new tanks and moving the bettas once they're set up, you'll be doing a fish in cycle. This process is crucial for fish keeping, and good knowledge to keep your animals happy, healthy, and safe. I'll try to give a quick run down for it though.

The nitrogen cycle is the process where your tanks build up beneficial bacteria that break down waste from your fish and fishs food into ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. The bacteria are needed to maintain a healthy tank and grow on surfaces such as gravel, decor, plants, heater, filter, tank glass, but they are not in the water itself. And a filter is necessary to keep beneficial bacteria because it circulates water, provides aeration, and has a ton of surface area for them to grow in.

Ammonia and nitrites are harmful and deadly to your fish. Nitrates are less deadly, and are what you're aiming to get to in the cycling process, but you still don't want a bug buildup of them either. The absolute most important thing for cycling your new betta tanks for the next few weeks is to be on top of your water change game to keep your bettas safe.

For the first 2 weeks, you will want to do 40-50% water changes every other day. After that, for another 2 weeks, water changes every 3 days at 40-50%. The next 2 weeks, water changes every 3-4 days at 30-40%. After the initial month and two weeks of water changes, you can move onto water changes once or twice a week at 30-40%. It sounds like a lot, but it will keep your fish safe from ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate spikes during the cycling process.

Some good things to keep on hand to help during cycling is some Seachem Prime, or Seachem Neutral Regulator. These are all in one water conditioners that remove chlorine, chloramine, heavy metals, AND detoxifies ammonia and nitrites for 48 hours (not a replacement for water changes though. Those are still very much necessary)

https://www.amazon.com/Safe-250-g-8-8-oz/dp/B0002A5WOC/ref=mp_s_a_1_6?keywords=seachem+prime&qid=1572620732&sprefix=seachem+&sr=8-6

https://www.amazon.com/Seachem-116030601-Neutral-Regulator-250gram/dp/B000255P9E/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?keywords=seachem+neutral+regulator&qid=1572620778&sprefix=seachem+neu&sr=8-1#immersive-view_1572620800767

And a great way to kick start your bacteria bloom and speed up cycling is with some live nitrifying bacteria. I use topfin, and a big bottle is about $10. But api is great too.

https://www.amazon.com/API-Nitrifying-Aquarium-Maintains-Biological/dp/B006YG12F6/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?keywords=top+fin+live+bacteria&qid=1572620840&sr=8-2

And, if you need more information on the cycling process, feel free to reach out, or look up "nitrogen cycle" in google, or check out a very helpful video by KGTropicals called "everything you need to know about the nitrogen cycle."

https://youtu.be/es7spyo5RJ4

Apologies for long post, but I hope this helps you and your little dudes! ☺️

u/carry_on_phenomenon · 13 pointsr/Dogtraining

Oh Lordy I have a ton...I'll try to categorize them...

Best for Puppies
These are all easy toys that dispense a lot of kibble with very little movement. Perfect for baby puppies or really low-confidence dogs. These can also be upgraded in difficulty later by stuffing them with wet food and freezing, or stuffing with a large, hard to extract treat (like a slice of lunchmeat).

  • PetSafe Busy Buddy Twist 'n Treat...total pain in the ass to fill if you put more than half a cup of food in it, but it's a great "intro to puzzle toys" for a dog that has never had to work for food before. Also very easy to clean.
  • Soda Pup Coffee Cup...representative of a whole genre of "rubber toys with large holes" that make great easy kibble toys or challenging stuff and freeze toys. Some other toys in this genre are the Kong and the West Paw Toppl. I like the Soda Pup ones best because they have higher capacity and a flat bottom.
  • Planet Dog Orbee Tuff Snoop...pretty easy by itself with kibble, can be made more challenging by stuffing a Mazee ball in the large hole.
  • Plastic Milk Jug...or a water bottle, raid your recycling bin. You'll have to supervise to make sure your puppy doesn't shred and eat the jug, but it's a relatively easy and fun (and free) enrichment item. Another puzzle toy you may find in your recycling bin is a cardboard box filled with paper balls. Sprinkle some treats in the box, fill with the balls, and let your dog forage around in your DIY ball pit.

    Easy Rollers
    These basically just dispense kibble by rolling. Not particularly complex, but good for the dog that prefers to solve puzzles by brute force.

  • IQ Treat Ball...this toy takes the longest to empty out of all my toys, but it is way too freaking small and loud as hell on my hardwood at 6am. Really easy to fill and clean though, as it comes completely apart.
  • Omega Paw Tricky Treat Ball...a lot quieter but it empties faster and isn't as easy to fill (or clean).
  • Kruuse Buster Cube...this one is also ungodly loud, but it takes a good while to empty despite the fairly consistent payoff per roll. It's a cube (but they also make a spherical one) and the insides have a few baffles to keep kibble from just falling out.

    Wobblers
    These require a more finessed rolling motion to empty, so they're the next step up from just batting a toy around.

  • PetSafe Busy Buddy Kibble Nibble...more of a wobbler/roller hybrid. Surprisingly time-consuming for how huge the holes are, and it gets an A+ for filling and cleaning. Unfortunately my GSD knows how to unscrew it, so it's not much of a challenge for him.
  • Starmark Bob-A-Lot...lots of ways to adjust the difficulty on this one, which is nice. I had a foster chew the yellow piece off of mine, but it still works well.
  • Kong Wobbler...pretty standard toy, I actually do not have one of these but I know a lot of people that like them. They're available at big box pet stores which is nice.
  • Nina Ottosson Pyramid...very similar to the Kong Wobbler, but the hole is in a more difficult location. Good toy but the bottom could use more counterweighting for the wobble action.
  • PetSafe Busy Buddy Magic Mushroom...really good wobble action, but for some reason it's common for dogs to try and chuck this one down the stairs and break it. I've heard of a few dogs doing this, including my GSD. I have no idea what about this toy screams "fling me down the stairs!"

    Complex Action Toys
    These need movement in more than one direction (or very specific movement) to get kibble out of, which makes them pretty challenging.

  • PetSafe Busy Buddy Tug-a-Jug...this toy is hard to learn but easy to master. Once your dog figures out the mechanism it doesn't last long. Also that rope gets SUPER GROSS.
  • Nina Ottosson Board Games...I don't personally have any of these because my dogs cannot be trusted with small parts, but I've heard people say good things about them.
  • Trixie Mad Scientist...this toy is cool because the dog has to learn to spin the tubes slowly or centripetal acceleration holds the food in. Good exercise in impulse control. I had a DIY one for awhile but my dogs decided to brute force this toy.

    Soothing, Low Energy Toys
    Along with the stuff n' freeze toys, these are good for dogs on crate rest or who need some extra help relaxing before bed.

  • Snuffle Mat...great toy for activating a dog's foraging instincts and calming their minds. This is a good DIY project, or you can get extra lazy and chuck a bunch of food into the grass for nature's puzzle toy.
  • HyperPet Lickimat...my cats eat their wet food from the orange kind ("buddy"), and my dogs use the green kind ("soother") with some PB or cheese as a distraction during grooming. You can spread a thin layer of something tasty on them and freeze for a long-lasting treat that promotes the calming behavior of licking.


    My dogs (and cats!) eat all their food out of puzzles so I am constantly on the lookout for new challenges! I'd be happy to provide more details on any of the toys I have, or buy and review any toys people have been wondering about :)
    EDIT: btw this Jackson Galaxy Asteroid is my favorite cat puzzle toy. They really need to make one for dogs because it is kinda quirky with its bounciness and super quiet.
u/[deleted] · 1 pointr/Dogtraining

Your dog sounds so much like mine when he was the same age. It drove me nuts because we have a huge yard for him to run around, but when I'd let him out there he'd run for like 3 seconds and then lie down and chew on sticks. Then, when he got back in the house, he was still crazy.

Rodney was never super into toys, especially right at first. He didn't really understand how to play tug properly, and he didn't fetch (and he's a golden retriever! That's supposed to come pre-installed!). All he wanted to do was wrestle and roughhouse. Eventually, though, with enough persistence, we got him interested in fetching balls down the hall, and he LOVES tug now. It just took time for him to figure out what he liked and what the toys were for.

I bought a lot of toys for him at the beginning of his life. Spent a lot of money on them. Now I don't buy them anymore because the ones we have are holding up fine, and he likes them. His favorites are hol-ee roller, the dna toy, the IQ treat ball, big Chuck-it, and the orka ball.

The hol-ee roller and dna toy are awesome for fetch-and-tug. The only way we could get him to start fetching was to play tug with him when he brought the item back. He loves those two toys. The treat ball has been a lifesaver. We feed him his meals out of it, and it gives us some peace while we're eating as well as entertaining him. We recently got another similar toy called a snoop. This one is super awesome because it holds more food, and it's super quiet because it's made of squishy rubber, not hard plastic like the IQ ball. The orka ball is fun because it's so squishy and bouncy. He loves lacrosse balls because they're really bouncy, too. The orka is also cool because it's hollow, so you can stick treats in there. And the big Chuck-it ball has been great because he can grab onto really easy with the ridges, and I can kick a ball WAY further than I can throw it. The ball never gets lost because it's so big!

A tip to renew interest in the deer antler: boil it in chicken broth and let it dry out completely. This just gives it a new taste, and it worked when I did it for our dog.

A really good treat if you can find them is raw bones. Not the cooked ones they sell at pet stores, but uncooked bones you buy from a butcher. Ask at your local grocery store or butcher if they have bones for dogs, and if they don't know what you're talking about, ask if they have bones for making soup stock. Freeze the bones when you bring them home, and then give one to your pup! They're totally safe for dogs because unlike cooked ones, they won't splinter or break up dangerously. My dog used to spend forever licking out ever bit of marrow from the bones. They'll also clean your pup's teeth. :)

u/MooseTheWizard · 6 pointsr/Aquariums

Too small for a bristlenose, and you want 6 neons (this tank is too small for them as well). I don't know much about kuhli loaches, but this is probably a tight fit for them too.

This is also a very, very heavy stocking for a 13.7 gallon aquarium. As this is your first tank, I highly suggest going for a small stock and getting a feel for it - solving problems with a low bioload is much easier, and will give you much needed practice for when things occur down the road.

I would recommend that you get solely a male betta for now. Your decor choice is good, and I applaud you for going with sand over gravel. It's much better, objectively.

If you can find them at your local fish store (LFS), pick up some Malaysian trumpet snails (MTS). They'll aerate the substrate and cycle waste into the sand, as well as eat uneaten food and decaying plant matter.

In terms of filtration, you could probably get away with an air pump and a sponge. If you have a fair chunk of money to dedicate to this aquarium, my filter of choice for tanks under 15 gallons is the ZooMed 501. If that is outside of your budget, an AquaClear 20 would be great. I would have the outflow disperse over your driftwood to avoid churning up your sand. If you need creative ideas, feel free to post here again and we can help you figure something out. The primary advantage of the canister is that it is dead silent, and comes with a spray bar which greatly helps to disperse the flow (bettas do not appreciate lots of flow in their environment).

I would do your damnedest to keep the tank out of sunlight, as this will contribute to rampant algae problems. It should have a dedicated light. You can purchase a clamp light and 6500K CFL bulb from home depot for about $15 total. Very wise investment, and this allows you to grow plants!

You need to keep the tank (for a Betta) at 78-80F. If your ambient temperature is not this, you will require a heater. My personal favourite heater for small aquariums are manufactured by Hydor. Aim for 50W for the set up. Here is a link to one.

There is a very good link regarding cycling in the sidebar. It can be found here.

While I do not know your water's composition, I would still recommend treating it with SeaChem Prime. This helps out with some heavy metals as well. While I am not sure if it will benefit you, it is fairly cheap and you'll get a ton of uses out of it for the cost. Hopefully someone with a similar water source to yours will chime in, as I myself am on municipal supply and must dechlorinate my water.

Earlier when I mentioned lighting, I mentioned plants. These are a great addition to your aquarium and your fish will appreciate them. For beginner plants, I would recommend looking into Anubias and Java Fern. They do not grow in substrate, but rather on decor and can be fastened to your driftwood with zip ties or string. They absorb nutrients from the water column, helping to clean your tank while providing refuge for your fish. I would also recommend a floating plant, as it will dim the lights and provide your betta with cover. Frogbit is great, and very cheap in my experience. It grows very well. None of these plants require you to do ANYTHING extra aside from get that light I mentioned. There are fancier alternatives, but they are not necessary for this set up with the above plants. I highly recommend setting your lights up on a timer and keeping them on for 8 hours a day. If you notice algae, reduce light.

I hope this helps. If you have anymore questions feel free to let me know. Really great of you to come and ask for advice BEFORE purchasing an animal, kudos to you.

Be sure to check out /r/bettafish and /r/plantedtank. Within you'll find lots of guides and extremely knowledgeable people. I would highly recommend reading the majority of links from the side bar in those two subreddits, as well as this one. There's a trove of information at your disposal. Here's a link to /r/Aquariums' wiki.

Finally, here's a care sheet specifically about Bettas!

Hopefully that wasn't too long winded for you. Best of luck in the hobby.

u/Oucid · 5 pointsr/bettafish

Hey there! Bettas can be super fun to have and you’re gonna love watching Harmony grow!

It looks like a lot of people already started pointing you in the right direction, I want to add on to that a bit since this is a baby betta (or just much younger, cant tell that well haha sorry)

Babies need a little bit of extra care to survive, they’re more fragile than adults.

So important stuff: feeding, temperature, water changes, and “cycling” (Disclaimed: I may repeat stuff others posted)

Feeding babies - Since she is small, she only needs a bit of food each day. Babies need a lot of nutrients to grow, and we can’t always give them that super varied live diet, luckily there’s options like using supplements and frozen foods. It’s best to feed small amounts throughout the day, frozen bloodworms would work, soaked in Seachem’s Nourish for nutrients and vitamins she needs to grow healthy! You could feed one whole bloodworm a day or tiny pieces of crushed pellets, Fluval Bug Bites or Northfin Betta Bits are healthy pellets with minimum fillers and preservatives, lots of good ingredients too but shell probably still need a supplement like Nourish. You could probably find it online, I linked an amazon link below. In order to properly digest and metabolize the food, she’ll need the proper heat.

Temperature - Adult bettas can thrive in water temperatures between 78-80°F, babies on the other hand need the water to be a bit warmer at around 81-82°F. To achieve this temperature, youll probably need an adjustable heater. The smallest adjustable heater I can think of is a 25watt heater, which would be too strong for a small bowl like that.

Tank - A 3 gallon tank would fit a 25 watt heater nicely for now, then when she gets bigger you can upgrade her to a 5 gallon and still use the same heater! (A general rule is 5watts per gallon, but a 25watt would work fine in a 3 gallon) You’ll also need to cycle the tank, which i’ll explain more below, and do frequent water changes once its cycled because while the fish grow, they produce a hormone that if it builds up in the water can stunt the fish’s growth - decreasing the lifespan. In a cycled 3 gallon tank, 3-5 small water changes each week would be great in my opinion. You also want to keep the water clean of course! Gravel vacuums are great for that.

Now onto the big part, cycling and the nitrogen cycle.

Since you already have your fish, you’ll have to fish-in cycle.

Fish-in cycling -

Basically consists of 1/2 water changes every day using Seachem Prime. Do this until your tank is cycled, which I’ll explain how to know that below.

While cycling, add the beneficial bacteria directly into the filter daily.

• ⁠A good filter set up is something with low flow, it can be baffled if needed. For filter media (or the guts of the filter) cermaic bio media, aquarium sponge, and filter floss would be great. Don’t replace any of this unless it starts breaking down, then you’ll need to seed new media, but you shouldn’t have to worry about that for a long time.

You’ll need an API Master Test kit, this is an accurate way to know your parameters (such as ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate). This is more accurate than strips, with test strips its super easy to get an inaccurate reading. The kit also lasts longer so you’ll get your money’s worth. I’ll include a link below to the kit.

When the tank is cycled, you’ll test and find 0 parts per million (ppm) ammonia, 0ppm nitrite, and ‘x’ amount ppm of nitrate. (Dont focus too hard on what parts per million means, its just how this stuff is measured. Nitrates should be kept under 20ppm, they arent as toxic as ammonia or nitrites but can be in large amounts.)

After your tank is cycled, you’ll need to do weekly water changes a few times a week using a gravel vacuum preferably. Gravel vacuum/siphons allow you to get the dirt out of the gravel easily without needing to take it out. (Leave the fish in when you gravel vacuum, take care to watch where she is especially since shes small) Highly recommend getting one of these! Its a necessity!

• ⁠Avoid large water changes, it could offset the balance of your tank. Never rinse the filter media in tap water, that can kill the beneficial bacteria (which I’ll send links to explain that more in a second). To clean the filter inserts aka media, just take them out and swish or squeeze in old tank water till the gunk is out. You’ll probably only need to do this once a month or so.

You may want to opt for a sponge filter, it should be safe for the baby so she doesn’t get sucked into any filter intakes. To set it up you’d need an air pump, standard airline tubing, a check valve, and things to make a bleed valve so you can adjust it.

Links-

Information:

Nitrogen Cycle: https://fishlab.com/nitrogen-cycle/

Fish-In Cycling: https://www.reddit.com/r/bettafish/wiki/fishincycle?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app

My diagram/explanation on the cycle:https://www.reddit.com/r/bettafish/comments/c8evu4/nitrogen_cycle_art_by_me/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app

Supplies:

API Freshwater Master Test Kit 800-Test Freshwater Aquarium Water master Test Kit https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000255NCI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_cEpvDb8R85Q1K

Seachem Prime Fresh and Saltwater Conditioner - Chemical Remover and Detoxifier 100 ml https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000255PFI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_u-kKDbTMV2W8K

Northfin Food Betta Bits 1Mm... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00M4Q5DQ4?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share

This is the best quality pellet I’ve found, here’s why:

• ⁠Nutritious, includes whole ingredients
• ⁠No fillers, hormones, or artificial pigments
• ⁠Packed with proteins, amino acids, vitamins, and minerals
• ⁠Floating pellets, roughly 1mm (they float for a bit then drop, my bettas chase them down)
• ⁠Easily digestible to promote optimal nutrient absorption

(This stuff is advertised by seller, but if you read the labels its all good. Harmony will be able to eat 5-6 of these daily as an adult. 2-3 in the morning, 2-3 at night)

Seachem Nourish 100ml https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0018CM0DO/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_sekRDbR4YR0NG

(If you do some research and find a supplement you like better, then by all means go for it!)

Helpful other supplies:

Seachem Stability Fish Tank Stabilizer - For Freshwater and Marine Aquariums 500 ml https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0002APIIW/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_k.kKDbDZMVD4J

(Bacteria in a bottle, it’ll help speed up the cycling process.)

Gravel Vacuum/Siphon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07Q97ZPSF/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_LblKDbFT79MAB

(Of course you don’t need this specific one, I just chose the best seller off Amazon as an example of what to look for. The local pet store should have these for around $10)

How to use a gravel vacuum: https://youtu.be/LYv5n0a85OY

u/kolkolkokiri · 2 pointsr/Siamesecats

I assume he's a kitten? Up to three months old cats generally are super bitey because they are infants learning their litter mates limits and sticking everything in there mouths. This will likely end by like 6 to 10 months naturally, still worth training though.

Dogs and cats have kinda similar bite inhibition training (aka the big ones being dramatic like owie or like no bad and shoving off with a paw) so the dog may help but I would not keep them around each other without someone to keep an eye for a while.

I think that's enough but for the first 8 months his energy will be endless. So don't feel bad he's up at 3 am like hey play? You essentially have a 6 year old on a sugar high.

Depending on the size of dogs I'd get some toys, and a way to keep a dog out of a room like a baby gate or area so you can leave small cat toys out. For a kitten I highly suggest a box of random assorted toys to find what they like, and avoiding cat nip filled ones. You don't need all these but if your family wants to get the kitty presents for Santa these are my suggestions at a young age.


General


  • If your parents allow it maybe a climbing wall will make your cat happy as fuck.
  • Most cats in my experience prefer both those cardboard scratchers and one solid almost unmoveable one. Like the couch. Save the couch, get a wall mounted one or one that is weighted to keep from moving. Double sided sticky tape, or aluminum foil are both good things to keep a cat from going on something you don't wanna.
  • If you study at home lots or your cat likes cuddling you while on the computer get a shallow box or tray and fold an old shirt in it. They will like it better then most beds. Otherwise those USB heated pet pads will be super popular but obviously only if you trust cat not to chew on it. A cheap desk hutch also seems to work well as most cats will be happy to look down on your homework.
  • PS when you move if you get the generic cheap IKEA cube shelf / bookcase / tv unit there's DIYs for a cat climber that's hidden and stuff.

    Toys


  • Bouncey springs milk jug rings and hair elastics (be careful with these) are super popular with younger cats because they move erratically.
  • Myler balls are super popular with one of my cats, paper bags and those cat tunnels that make crinkle sounds are also good.
  • A treat ball is a super great way to get some silence while studying.
  • They make laser toys that sit on a shelf and randomly turn on and off but my cats weren't interested. If you can borrow one before buying as those toys are 20$ to 40$. But a kitten might enjoy it more.
  • That ball with a tail will be adored I'm sure, they also sell remote control mice, Hexbugs for cats and other battery operated toys. These again should probably be used under supervision.
  • If your cat likes hunting, get a catnip kicker or fill a sock with batting and maybe a toy that makes noise. This is basically a long thing big enough for the cat to do those bunny kick things. It's a fucking sock, just sew closed a sock.
  • [Over the door cat toy](Ethical A-Door-Able Bouncing Mouse Cat Toy https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B0002DJ6XW/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_X4E.zb9R0EQRJ) is probably also good.


    This is super long but tdlr, your doing good, he's a kitten, he wants to play a lot when he's nibbling, here's a shit ton of cool cat stuff.
u/deejaywhy · 2 pointsr/PlantedTank

Fair warning, incoming essay haha

27 gallons is perfectly fine. The first thing you will want to read up on is the nitrogen cycle and fishless cycling. The best way to cycle your tank is to ask a local fish or pet store if they can give you some used filter media to jump start your cycle. If not, buy an API test kit and follow the steps in those guides then your tank will cycle in about a month.

For filters you have two main options Hang off the back (HOB) or canister. HOB are easy to maintain and clean which seems great as a beginner. They need to be cleaned every couple-few weeks. Aquaclear are great HOBs. For your size tank I would get an aquaclear 50 or two of the 20/30s (one for each side).

I prefer canister filters. They give you more options for customization, can hold more media, and don't need to be cleaned as often as HOB. Buuuut they typically come at a steeper price. The most popular brands are eheim, fluval, and sunsun. I have eheims and love them. Reviews for sunsuns can be hit or miss, but they definitely have good value for their price. When picking a filter you generally want a turnover rate of 8-10 times your tank size. So 27 gallon tank, youd want about 216 - 270 gallons per hour (gph), keep this in mind when picking a canister.

If you plan on tropical fish you will definitely need a heater. Aqueon pro and eheim make good heaters. If you go canister, you can get an inline heater which are nice because you don't have to look at it or try to hide it in your aquarium.

For planted tanks you need a substrate. The cheapest option is to use pool filter sand along with some root tabs. Look into the walstad method if you wanna keep it low tech and cheap. The only problem with this method is that if you ever want to move plants or hardscape around it can be a bit messy. The more expensive route is to buy some aquasoil. There are a few types, but the most well known is ADA aquasoil. These substrates are packed with nutrients that last at least a couple years usually. In between is to use a porous substrate like Fluorite or eco-complete. These come with a little nutrients, but will need fertilizers to continue its benefit.

Fertilizers area great way to keep your plants happy and healthy, but for many plants are not really necessary. If you decide to use them you can buy them in liquid or dry form. I suggest buying dry because it is much cheaper, but you will have to figure out how much you need to dose. Luckily there are calculators out there that can do it for us!

Lighting you have many options. My favorite are finnex LEDs. They are middle of the ground pricing wise and do their job very well in my experience. Here is a good guide for lighting. When researching a light you want to use you should do so by finding its PAR value at the level of your substrate. Low is about 0-30 PAR, medium 30-50, and high 50+ PAR. Low you don't need pressurized CO2 to avoid algae, medium it is recommended, but you can get away with a densely planted aquarium and use of seachem excel, and high you need pressurized CO2.

I like to use hardscape in my aquariums. Things like rock and drift wood give a natural appearance to aquariums, provide shelter for livestock and take up space. If you get into aquascpaing, hardscape plays a major role.

Plant selection will depend on your lighting, fertilizer, and CO2. Here is a list of good low light/low tech plants. If you want more demanding plants do your research and ask questions if you have them!

Fish selection depends on you and what you like. See a fish you're interested in? Do NOT automatically trust a sales man at a petshop or fish store. Do your own research on the fish before buying and ask questions about people's experience with the fish and its compatibility with your tank. In a 27 gallon you can fit 1, maybe 2, groups of most smaller schooling fish and then some bottom feeders.

A general stocking plan would be 10-12 of a schooling fish like neon tetra (or something of that size), 10 salt and pepper cories, 6 otocinclus, and some red cherry shrimp.

The most important advice I can give you is to do your research. Doing your research will save you time and money. People are generally friendly and helpful on this subreddit so don't be afraid to ask more questions.

u/TheShadyMilkman206 · 1 pointr/bettafish

150 is totally realistic. Planted tanks are the best. I'm not sure what advice you've already received but 10 gallons is "big enough". It is just that the larger the body of water the easier it is to keep stable. 10 gallons is an awesome starting point. I'll take a shot at a $150 total setup, that is plenty for a planted tank:

u/tokisushi · 5 pointsr/puppy101

>Now when I feed her I feel like she is going to choke from eating too fast

For young puppies, I always encourage people to put the food bowl away and find different ways to feed. Bowls can be just fine for adult dogs - but while puppy is young and learning it is important to overcome any resource guarding and leverage every training opportunity you can. Bowls are a wasted opportunity for any of this training - so consider stashing it away for now.

So, how do you feed without a bowl?

  • Stuff kongs with all or a portion of a meal and seal with peanut only peanut butter, wet food, 100% pumpkin only puree (no pie filling) or yogurt and freeze. This will give your puppy a cool tasty treat to work on - buying you enough time to eat your OWN meals or get something done.

  • Use a puzzle toy like an IQ ball. Dogs are natural scavengers and getting to solve puzzles to earn food will help stimulate their mind and their foraging instincts. Puzzles will slow them down and get them thinking (which, for young puppies can be enough to usher in a nap!)

  • Hand feed. Hand feeding small amounts of kibble can help reduce resource guarding (food comes from you, not the magical metal bowl on the floor) and also give you an opportunity to teach skills like "leave it".

  • Use a portion of meals as training rewards. You are going to need a healthy supply of treats to start your training with your pup - using some kibble as part of your treat bag is a great way to reward behaviors without adding a lot of junk food or calories. Look into positive reinforcement, training basics, clicker training and nothing in life is free.

    What schedule should you feed on/how much?

  • How much you feed depends on the quality and type of food as well as the age, activity level, breed and environment of the dog. The best way to get started with this is to pick out a high quality food and follow the feeding chart on the bag conservatively and adjust over time - monitoring your dogs weight visually, their stools (regular, firm, minimal waste - if your dog poops A LOT and FREQUENTLY and are consistently soft or runny, you may need to switch foods) , their coat (soft, glossy, shedding normally but not excessively), their eyes/nose/ears (clear and free of redness - consistent redness of puffiness could be the sign of an allergy) and mouth ( clean white teeth, healthy pink gums).

  • For young puppies, opt to divide the total food requirement a day into 4 'meals' - we fed 3 at usual meal times (in a toy, kong or with training) and kept the fourth reserved JUST for training throughout the day (mixed with some high value treats). You can adjust however you need to to work for your routine, but many people (vets, trainers, breeders) advise feeding 3 times a day until the pup is older (at least 6 months of age)

  • It is best for a pup to be a little on the leaner side than the fatter side - if you notice your pup is putting on weight, reduce the amount of food (by 1/8 to 1/4c a day) and observe over the next week or two and adjust again if needed. Same applies to a pup that is too thin - increase by 1/8-1/4c, observe, adjust if needed.

  • Remember that if you are using high value treats to adjust the pups kibble level as necessary. One or two freeze dried liver treats a day are OK, but if you spend a whole session dealing out nothing but hot dogs, cheese or zukes - compensate for the extra calories by cutting out a little kibble in the next meal (and consider incorporating more kibble into their training rewards to ensure their meals are staying balanced).

u/ski3 · 1 pointr/dogs
  1. Kong Wubba Friend. Summit has the fox and it's his absolute favorite toy. He likes other wubbas too, but the fox is his favorite by a long shot. It's also super durable and doesn't have a bunch of stuffing to pull out. He loves the squeaking, the floppy tentacles, and it makes a great fetch toy as well.

  2. Nylabone Prime Rib. Summit loves all Nylabones. His favorite is actually the dinosaur one, but I worry about the size of it and it stresses me out when he chews it. He loves the one we got him on sale after Christmas and I like the size. Really though, any Nylabone chew could be substituted in here. Summit loves chewing and Nylabones give him a great outlet for that.
  3. Omega Paw Tricky Treat Ball. I love the idea of food dispensing toys and Summit does too. It keeps him entertained and out of trouble for quite a while and he loves pushing it around and trying to get the food out. He gets extremely excited whenever he sees us pull this particular toy out of the toy bin.
  4. Chuck It Max Glow Ball. We're still working on Summit's ball drive and it is definitely improving with age (yesterday he was actually running into a lake to fetch tennis balls which was a big first for him), but I love the bond that fetch gives. I also love things that glow in the dark (we could play when it gets dark out!) and the durability of the Chuck It balls as opposed to regular tennis balls.
  5. Kong. A treat dispensing toy I can leave with him that he doesn't need as much room to use as the tricky treat ball. I also love trying the different recipes to throw in his Kong and it is great for calming him down.
u/jmsilverman · 2 pointsr/shiba

(1) we have used all of the above. Standard collar holds tags the best, our training class provided a choke collar and we find it easiest for walks, and when he was still very small (8 weeks came home, so for about our first month or so) had him in the harness before we started training.

(2) we have all 3 - the retractable is new and I haven't used it yet, but we got it for beach trips so he can roam, then we started with a nylon and got a leather one from the class. We now use the leather mostly... just because its nice on the human paws :)

(3) We started with a 36" crate, at basically full grown he's fitting in pretty tightly, but still fits. We also ended up adding an ex-pen. If I was buying the crate now, I'd go up a size or two so he'd have some more space. I also highly recommend the pen if you have room.

(4) We've gone through a lot of beds... he's chewed them to bits... so might as well start off simple and cheap. He put a hole in the nice one we got recently within an hour.

(5) When he first came home, his favorites were the rope toys and unstuffed animals with squeekeres. Don't get things with stuffing!! They will try to eat it, and that makes for a lot of supervision needed. Now that he's a little older, he also loves balls, particularly [with teeth]
(https://smile.amazon.com/Coevals-Club-Interactive-Non-Toxic-Cleaning/dp/B01LARUD6M/ref=sr_1_17?ie=UTF8&qid=1493386356&sr=8-17&keywords=treat+ball+for+dog)
& [brain activity] (https://smile.amazon.com/OurPets-Treat-Ball-Interactive-Dispensing/dp/B003ARUKTG/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1493386356&sr=8-3&keywords=treat+ball+for+dog)

(6) Foods:

  • Blue Buffalo Puppy Chow
  • Local pet store organic puppy mix
  • Pupperoni training treats
  • Beggin' Bacon Strips
  • Blue Buffalo PB Hearts crunch treats
  • Blue Buffalo dental sticks
  • [Bully Sticks] (https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B01HBVSG74/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1) - mostly for teething, but he does "eat" them
    (7) We did a local class. For socializing, we've made sure to introduce him to people from day one - and dogs since he was fully vaxxed unless we know the dog.

    (8) Biggest challenge - he has chewed up window sills, door frames, etc when home alone. We originally thought it was OK to leave him in an empty room with just his toys etc bc we had an empty bedroom. He ruined the listed items of the room. Hence, adding the ex-pen. Happiest moments - it's like when people talk about their partners and babies... its the little moments, like when they snuggle up which you don't expect because its rare for the breed, or when they accomplish something - like being house broken, or a command (sit, etc).

    (9) we're lucky... he loves both dogs and people. Archer is an attention whore, and the more praise and play the better. This can vary by individual dog, like individual human.

    (10) The only thing I wish I could change is how long my commute it, and how late I get in. My husband is able to spend more time with the puppy than me which is just my own jealousy. Also... we use a dog walker 1-2 times a day (we're moving down to 1 now that he holds his bladder/bowels longer). The mid-day visit is SO important, if you can't take lunch at home... you need to have him with someone - a dog walker, a pet daycare. He cannot be alone for that long.

    Also... know he's a smart breed. He's not like a lab or a collie who will live to please you. You live to serve him (or her! I have a boy, so I keep using him) which means that you have to learn about his idiosyncracies. Because he is smart, but easily bored... you will need to figure out what kind of attention and stimulation keeps your shibe baby happy. Is it mental stimulation and logic puzzles? They make more than the tops I shared... so start looking. Also, just play hide and seek. Does his hunter instinct kick in? Sometimes, when he's feeling extra frisky instead of feeding him in a bowl, I'll toss his kibble and treats into the toy, or literally around the room so he can "hunt" for dinner. Is he feeling neglected? Bored? he's going to cause trouble...so how can you make sure he knows you love him. Think of him like April Ludgate in Parks & Rec, or a cat. He wants to know he can have your attention when he wants it - but he will not just snuggle because you want to... or pay attention to you if it doesn't meet his interests or needs. You'll fall in love (hopefully) and won't care, but the shiba will rule the fam not vice versa so get ready for it.
u/BrilliantNova · 12 pointsr/shrimptank

I was in your shoes not too long ago, it's overwhelming! Here's a list of things that I bought, but I am not an expert so if others have better input go for that:

Equipment

  • 10 gallon tank with hood
  • Broad Spectrum Light The one that came with the hood did not provide enough for the plants, you definitely need to invest in a broad spectrum bulb.
  • CaribSea Flora Max Substrate I learned that shrimp prefer darker color substrate, this was worth the investment! My shrimp were so unhappy with cheap gravel, after switching to this substrate they are very active.
  • Air pump
  • Sponge filter
  • Heater, maybe optional for you?
  • Thermometer
  • Gallon Bucket
  • Siphon
  • Seachem Prime Because it's a smaller tank, I ended up poking a pinhole sized hole in the seal so that I could use it as drops rather than pouring it in.
  • [Seachem Stability] (https://www.amazon.com/Seachem-67101230-Stability-500ml/dp/B0002APIIW/ref=sr_1_1?s=pet-supplies&ie=UTF8&qid=1499786377&sr=1-1&keywords=seachem+stability) Use this while you're cycling your tank, follow the instructions.
  • API Test Kit
  • Feeding Tray For the longest time I was really confused as to how the feeding tray worked, you can either get a tube or pre-soak the pellets and then drop them into the tray using long tweezers. This will help prevent ammonia/nitrite spikes.
  • Long Tweezer Set
  • Pellets Do also feed them blanched vegetables, make sure to peel the skin and buy organic to avoid chemicals/pesticides
  • Timer Outlet Worth the investment! So you don't have to keep remembering to turn the light on and off.

    Shop for whatever is cheaper, I have a huge heater because I had an extra one from before. I've read that it's not necessary but also have read that if you want them to breed you need to stimulate warm water. For now, I keep the heater off and leave it at room temperature of 72F. They seem very happy! Most important in my opinion, add plenty of plants and a marimo ball or 2.

    Lastly, I'm unsure of the siphon, I think it's good to have a bucket and siphon just in case your water parameters are looking bad so you are prepared to do a water change. From what I read, shrimp have a very low bio load and should be able to sustain themselves. Make sure to do tests regularly.

    EDIT I just read that this is your first aquarium, so here is a detailed write up:

    Setting up your tank

    1. Find a stable top to place your aquarium on, keep in mind a well sunlit room will mean more plant/algae growth. Make sure it's sturdy and made for heavy objects, don't want to place it on a flimsy shelf or it might break! I keep mine on top a waterproof place mat because water drips are going to happen.
    1. Rinse everything as a precaution! NEVER use dish soap!! If you must sanitize, vinegar is okay. Just make sure to rinse thoroughly. Also, NEVER use any kind of soap on your hands before handling things, just rinse well with water. Add your substrate, I lightly rinsed mine as there are beneficial bacteria living inside the substrate, pour it in. Make sure it's at least 2" of floor. Your water will be cloudy if you bought the substrate I listed, don't worry as it will settle after an hour and be clear.
    1. Fill water half way, use a small plate and pour the water on top of that to avoid the substrate being pushed around. NEVER use hot water! If you're using tap water be sure to always use cold water. It's also recommended to purchase "RO water" (Reverse Osmosis Water) as some times your tap water can be too "hard". The best thing to do is use the test kit on tap water and go from there. If the kH/gH are very high 100+ you will need to use RO water. I like to place my plants and decor now while the tank is half full. Place in your thermometer, heater, sponge filter, etc. After that, continue to fill all the way to the top remembering to aim the stream on top the plate. Leave about a half to an inch from the top.
    1. Take out plate, plug in filter, add in Seachem Prime and Seachem Stability. Please read the label for instructions and dosage according to your tank size. Since there is nothing inside you can add it after you've added the water to the tank. Moving forward, be sure to add the chemicals in the water bucket BEFORE pouring into the tank.
    1. Turn on filter, wait for the water to settle and temperature to come up. They say shrimp can tolerate 52F to 86F but ideally room temperature water is best, this is where your water heater will come into play. Follow which ever cycling method you choose before purchasing your shrimp. This can take up to 6 weeks.

      After your tank has cycled

    1. When adding your shrimp, there are many methods, the way I acclimate my shrimp is:
    1. Put the shrimp in a 1 gallon tub using the water that they came in.
    1. Drop in a tablespoon of the tank water, ONCE every 2 minutes.
    1. After the water has reached 1/3 old water, 2/3rd new water, your shrimp are ready to be placed into your tank.

      Please don't skip the important step of acclimating your shrimp! They are very sensitive to water changes and this ensures that they will survive.

      Here are my water parameters, people have all kinds of ranges but this is what works for me:

  • kH: 60 / gH: 40 / pH: 7.0 / NO2: 0 / NO3: 20 / Ammonia: 0 / Temperature: 72F

    I hope this helps... again, I was in your shoes not too long ago, it was really overwhelming. But after a lot of research I think my tank is in a good place :). Other users, if there's anything in my list that seems incorrect please let me know!