Best products from r/LucidDreaming

We found 177 comments on r/LucidDreaming discussing the most recommended products. We ran sentiment analysis on each of these comments to determine how redditors feel about different products. We found 140 products and ranked them based on the amount of positive reactions they received. Here are the top 20.

Top comments mentioning products on r/LucidDreaming:

u/DOOOOOOOOOOM · 4 pointsr/LucidDreaming

So unfortunately it seems most of the initial research I did into certain techniques on this subreddit was before I had made an account, so I don't have any of them saved. :(

A few links though, in case you haven't checked them out yet...
From the sidebar:

  • Quickstart Guide

  • FAQ

    Probably worth investigating all those other sidebar links, I haven't done so myself yet, but they look promising. :)

    GREAT Wikibooks article on LD induction techniques:

  • LD on Wikibooks

    Awesome Book:

  • Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming (8 bucks from Amazon, definitely worth the purchase. Good to have something to read about LDs when not at a computer.)

    There were several times in my two experiences where the dream began to fade. If I hadn't done these things the dreams would have ended far before they got really interesting:

  • Dream starting to fade away? Look at your hands, rub them together, touch your face with them. When I looked at my hands in the tale above, there were a dozen little thumbprint-swirlies spinning on each palm. Helped stabilize the fading dream.
  • Spinning also kept one of my dreams going. I've read you shouldn't spin frantically like a madman or anything, but a few twirls definitely kept my first LD going, somehow. :)
  • Reality checks: since I wear a digital watch (technically an iPod Nano on a wristband, but it has a watch too), checking my wrist for the time is extremely natural. I check it many times a day while awake, and in most cases digital displays just don't work right in dreams (though I've heard of exceptions.) If the time is changing crazily every time you look at it, or has nonsensical times displayed as mentioned above, you're probably dreaming.
  • If you wake up and remember you were having an awesome dream, don't open your eyes and don't move your body at all. Imagine with all your might that you're still there, wherever you were. Hold onto the image, don't think with words, and you may fall back into it. It helped me above, and has helped me get back into several non-lucid dreams I was enjoying in the past.

    General tips from personal experience:

  • Avoid cannabis if you can. For me and many others, it inhibits dream recall. Having a LD is no good if you don't remember it. Vividly remembering dreams and the occasional epic LD is worth the tradeoff, IMO.
  • DREAM JOURNAL. Most important thing ever. The entire second LD I posted up there would have been lost had I not suddenly remembered the dream while taking a piss this morning, and I quickly dashed into my room to grab it and write down all I could. Not only does merely having one next to your pillow with a pen ready seem to increase dream recall, but can help when you're retelling your adventures. My initial write-up for all this felt a little off, so I went back and read it and noticed I had omitted some important things I didn't remember, though I had written it all down mere hours before. Also, don't get lazy with the dream journal. There's been a few mornings where I woke up and remembered a dream, but I groggily thought "meh, I'll write it down later" before turning over to snooze for a bit. When I got up ten minutes later, all memory of the dream was gone.
  • I have noticed that I remember dreams much more often if I've been reading about dreams/LDing the day/night before going to bed, and remembering more dreams means a higher chance of remembering the lucid ones.
  • Wish I had the old reddit links, but alas. I'd say keep an eye on this subreddit, check every submission for more tips from folks more skilled this than I am. (Only 2 so far!) Read other people's stories and see what worked for them.

    It took me a couple months to have the experience after I REALLY started researching it, so I'm sure it's only a matter of time for you if you keep at it, friend. :) Dream on!
u/Cobblest0ne · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

How long did you really try ? It took me like 3 years. Because I didn't want force myself to lucid dream. It didn't try straight for 3 years. Maybe here a month and there a month. I am guessing you maybe do RCs here and there, sometimes question reality but not really trying it hard.

Also you are doing only 1 technique. There is FILD, WILD, SSILD, VILD, MILD, ...

I recommend the sidebar :

All about Lucid Dreams. How to, sǝɔuǝıɹǝdxǝ, etc.

Please take discussions of the paranormal such as astral projection someplace else. Binaural beats are also inappropriate. Let's keep this in the realm of science.

Welcome to r/LucidDreaming! Please check out the sidebar and Wiki before posting.


***

  • Quickstart Guide for Beginners - Know this stuff before you post!


  • Frequently Asked Questions

  • An excellent Podcast by TheLucidSage

    ***

    Rules


  • . Be nice to everyone!

  • 1. All posts must be related to Lucid Dreaming!
    • 1a. No posts regarding just the paranormal. There's /r/astralprojection (among others) for that.
    • 1b. No posts just about dreams. There's /r/dreams and /r/thisdreamihad

  • 2. No advertising!

    ***

    Related Subreddits


  • The everything about dreaming multireddit!

  • Teaching Kids to Lucid Dream

  • Lucid Dreaming Memes

  • SleepParalysis

  • Lucid Dreaming Speculation

  • Dreams


    ***

    Some good ןɐıɹoʇnʇ links


  • Finger Induced Lucid Dreaming This appears to be the biggest improvement in lucid dreaming techniques in a long time. Be sure to give it a try.

  • Dream Views A good fairly comprehensive guide. There's also a great message board and an online dream journal.

  • LD4all A message board, it's got solid information and good community.

  • Mastering the Art of Lucid Dreaming A nice straightforward, step-by-step tutorial.

  • All Day Awareness is a great approach. Also check out [Lucid Living] (http://wedreamnow.info/?cat=7). They are both effort intensive, but pay back in lucid dreams and more awareness in life.

  • This FAQ was produced by the Lucidity Institute. It's not pretty, but is based on solid science.

    For when you are ready to obsess


  • Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming is THE book on Lucid Dreaming. "A Course in Lucid Dreaming" is the most thorough lucid dream training tutorial with lots of charts for you to keep track of your progress. (No link right now.)


    ***

    Lucid Dreaming Acronyms


    LD - Lucid Dreaming - Being aware that you are dreaming while in a dream.


    RC - Reality Check - A test to establish whether you are in a dream or waking life, actively done during the day in hopes that the habit will continue within dreams.


    DC - Dream Character - Any personality you encounter other than yourself...well, occasionally it can also be yourself.

    WBTB-Wake Back To Bed - Waking up for 20-30 minutes, then going back to bed increases the chances of lucid dreaming. Use that time to read about lucid dreaming or plan your dreams, and make your intention solid. Can be combined with other techniques.


    MILD - Mnemonically Induced Lucid Dream - In short, MILD is telling yourself as you are in bed ready to sleep that you are going to become lucid when you dream, then visualizing yourself in a dream becoming lucid. Repeat until you fall asleep.

    WILD - Wake-Induced Lucid Dream - A technique in which you maintain consciousness while your body falls asleep. Not for the squeamish.

    FILD - Finger-Induced Lucid Dream - A technique using subtle finger movements as you fall asleep.

    SSILD - Sense-Induced Lucid Dream - A technique where you use awareness of your various senses as you cycle through them while falling asleep.

    False Awakening - False Awakening is in essence just dreaming that you woke up, only to usually immediately after either actually wake or have another dream of waking up from the previous dreams. Those can often happen multiple times in sequence. It can be a bit jarring but also fun. If those happen often use it to do a reality check every time you wake up (or think you do).

    SP - Sleep Paralysis - A natural, safe part of the process of falling asleep which causes you to be unable to move your body. The paralysis process happens to you every time you go to sleep. When you WILD and experience SP, you are conscious while it happens. Sometimes you may be visited by the dream transition buddies--relax and enjoy the show until you can interact with your environment. Attempting to induce SP is NOT required to achieve lucidity.


u/TheRedBaron11 · 4 pointsr/LucidDreaming

I get excited by this question, but I don't want to type a bunch out again since I feel like I just did :)

I posted this (re-edited a bit) as a comment to my own thread a bit ago, so read it then if you have any questions about my opinions on the topic, please let me know!


----------


For starters, I've been reading this absolutely amazing book, I've had a few revelations into how purposeful meditation can help lucid dreaming techniques. Firstly, the book emphasizes the idea that one of the main purposes of meditation is to cultivate two things: Mindfulness and Stable Attention.

------

Mindfulness, many of you are very aware of. It includes both external observation (what's going on around you, sensations in your body, etc) and internal, metacognitive observation (awareness of emotion and thought). It means being peripherally aware of these things, without directing your primary attention towards them.

Many lucid dreaming techniques involve mindfullness, and ADA is the pinnacle. ADA is a technique that is not only geared towards dreaming - it is an end goal of many who are purely interested in the benefits it can bring to waking life as well.

------

Stable attention, on the other hand, is not so heavily emphasized in this sub. Meditation is like weight training for your mind. If you lift chest and bis every day, neglecting your legs, you'll look like a chicken. If you cultivate mindfullness without regarding stable attention, the book outlines a few "symptoms" that could not only make lucid dreaming harder, but also could be detrimental to (desired) brain function.

The hardest part about advanced stages of meditation seems to be combining the two together, at the same time, so that both your awareness and focus are effortless and powerful. For a long time, I was meditating with the purpose of developing ADA and mindfulness only. I have gotten very good at doing reality checks, my awareness is pretty solid throughout the day, and I often realize I'm dreaming. However, my ability to focus has not made very much progress - in fact sometimes I feel like it's gotten worse. Even though I become lucid often, the dream does not always become super vivid, the length is often short, and I tend to get distracted SUPER easily.

-------

Since I started focusing on the two as a pair during meditation, I have seen many benefits that come from training the attention, both awake and asleep. In waking life my focus has gotten better. Attention wanders naturally for everyone, but my cycle of re-focusing it has become much shorter. The way you get distracted doing work is the same way you get distracted from your meditation object (finger wagging, the breath, yoga poses, etc). In the dream world, the vividity of my dreams has increased, they've been more stable, and I'm more able to focus on my dream intentions without "losing it".

Instead of trying to be aware of everything and focused on nothing (the silence that we talk about), it is sometimes good to be aware of everything and focus on nothing but a meditation object. Something specific is best, such as the sensations of the breath passing the tip of your nose. This allows you to essentially do a "zoom", where you notice subtler and subtler sensations of the breath (sensations it would normally be impossible to feel because there is so much else going on to steal away your attention.) I'm sure you can imagine the benefits such controlled concentration can bring to whatever world you're in.

tl;dr You can't pick and choose what you want to train. The meditation and lucid dreaming package includes both mindfulness and stable attention, and training one to the exclusion of the other has consequences - awake or asleep.

u/SamsquamtchHunter · 8 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Heres my take. The TL:DR is this... BUY AND READ THIS BOOK. It is the bible of lucid dreaming, simply written, and easily explained by a scientist, the pioneer of lucid dreaming, a Stanford professor, he is basically THE MAN! But for reddit, here you go:

  1. Set a sleep schedule
    Go to bed and wake up at roughly the same time everynight, this is easy if you are employed or have kids etc, not so much for college students and partiers etc... Having a routine makes everything so much easier later, but is not a necessity...

  2. Build Dream Recall
    Wake up and write down your dreams, every morning, no matter what. Keep a pen and notebook next to your bed. Writing them down forces you to remember them. If you wake up at 330 am from a dream, write it down at 330 am, you will not remember it as well at 8 when you wake up. This serves multiple purposes I'll get into later, but most importantly, you could have a lucid dream, but if you don't remember it, you fail.

  3. Reality checks
    After you have a good amount of dreams written down (or voice recorded if thats your thing) Go back through them. Look for common occurances. For example, I often dream of my own home, but things are never right, there are extra rooms, things are arranged differently, you get it... Find things you often dream about, or things that keep occuring that should tip you off that your in a dream. Write these down and commit to doing a reality check every time they occur, for me, whenever I walk into my house, I check to make sure I'm dreaming. Usually just asking the question is enough to trigger lucidity, but not always. DO NOT BLOW THIS OFF. Don't ever answer a reality check with "of course I'm not dreaming" or you will in a dream state as well. I've made this mistake before, its pretty frustrating to wake up and recall that you said that while aboard a spaceship or something crazy... Google easy reality checks, like double checking digital clocks and rereading text (it changes in dreams, your brain is too busy to keep that stuff consistent)

    4)Setting yourself up for lucidity
    Now that you have a weeks or months of dreams journalized (results may vary) playing with your sleep schedule can be helpful, REM sleep (dream sleep) occurs in cycles of about 90 minutes. So 6 hours into your sleep you are entering a dream. Set your alarm for 6 hours or a bit after and get up, walk around, read about lucid dreaming, reread your dream journal, do some reality checks, focus your intentions on having a lucid dream, but in a positive, and not stressful way. Then go back to sleep half an hour or more later. You pick up in your sleep cycles and go straight into dreams, this makes it easy to become lucid, read up on WILD and MILD in Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming...

  4. Congrats, you did it, but probably screwed up.
    Tons of people will tell you their first lucid dream ended immediately, they became lucid, it was exciting, they woke up... It happens... Research stabilization techniques, two popular ones are spinning, and looking at your hands. Spinning my change your dream setting, but really who cares, you can change it back or do whatever later... Keep trying, don't get frustrated here you are SO CLOSE!

  5. Practice
    Not everyone can control dreams like a god their first few times, it takes practice. You have years and years of experience telling you people CANNOT fly, its hard to overcome. Do more reality checks in dreams, take it step by step... If you are lucid the hard part is done, just keep trying and you'll be a pro in no time!
u/Dream_Hacker · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

It's certainly tough to work for so long and not to reach your desired goals.

Lucidity results when many factors all come together at the same time: heightened self-awareness, memory, being well-rested, good dream recall, strong intention, being at the right phase of your sleep cycle. Also: being stress-free, having a healthy body and brain.

It sounds like you've worked on many of these things, at least individually. Maybe what you need to do is to work on them all in combination.

I'd avoid pure WILD attempts for a while: without having frequent enough DILDs under your belt, you may not be close enough to the "lucid dreaming feeling".

Whenever I'm going through a dry lucid or dream recall phase, I'll bring in the "big guns" to get jump-started again: setting strong intention to wake up after every dream. This means noticing those little wakings we all experience between sleep cycles during the night, and keeping your self awake just long enough to recall your dreams, grab a bit of awareness and head back to sleep. You don't want to stay up too long or this can cause insomnia, unless you're the type who can fall back to sleep easily and quickly.

Actually, that's a good question: can you easily and quickly fall back to sleep if you wake up during the middle of the night? Or are you more prone to insomnia? How long does it take you to fall b ack asleep on average?

I'm not saying to avoid WBTB altogether, it can be useful, but don't then try to WILD, just go back to sleep with the intention of being aware in your dreams, of getting lucid.

You may want to try an entirely new approach for a while. Perhaps follow the Tibetan Dream Yoga approach, for example:
http://www.amazon.com/Dreaming-Yourself-Awake-Tibetan-Transformation/dp/159030957X
and
http://www.amazon.com/The-Tibetan-Yogas-Dream-Sleep/dp/1559391014 (you can find a pdf of this online via google)

One other idea is to transform your approach to lucid dreaming. Don't invest your happiness into getting lucid dreams, and don't try to "force" lucid dreams, but rather just keep doing all of the prerequisites (keep working on dream recall, and daytime awareness). The most dense periods of lucid dreaming I've had were when I was really happy and involved with my waking activities, and very physically active (and getting a lot of sunlight, in summer time).

You want your attention on dreaming, but no to make it the focus of your existence and your self-worth. You must still really want it, (in fact, "need" it), but at the same time, stay positive about your waking life, and your non-lucid dreams. If you can write pages of dream journal entries every night, that's pretty awesome in and of itself, be thankful for that, some people can't recall dreams at all.

If you basically give yourself a goal of living mindfully, of being continally aware of your consciousness whether waking or dreaming, you will absolutely start having lucid dreams.

There are some suggestions, I hope you find some of them useful, good luck!

Oh, p.s., join a community-focused LD forum where you can make LD buddies, chat, read, and write about LDing as much as you like. There are links to some great ones in the sidebar.


u/zedpapa · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Haha my first lucid dream was triggered by an UFO in the sky because I used to have nightmares with them as a kid and thought to myself "oh, I always dream of UFOs" which led me to my first realization. Your mind becomes a lot clearer when you're faced with life-or-death situations, or just encounter something really unsettling or uncommon. The inner dialogue stops wandering away randomly and focuses exclusively on the object of our distress so it can find a solution or explanation more quickly.

However to have lucid dreams more often it's not the best approach to try inducing more scary situations in your dreams, rather it should be the overall clarity of your dreams which should be improved. Your clarity in dreams isn't that great usually (that's why you forget most of them by morning) but it gets a massive boost from scary situations. Like a muscle of your body, with practice you can strengthen your clarity in dreams (and waking life) as well with a few simple tricks and habits.

You must have heard about all of this before but I'll just give you the outlines just in case:

  • keep a dream journal, helps remembering dreams, improves average dream clarity over time if done consistently

  • reality checks when encountering anything in your waking life that catches your attention. the goal of this is to develop a habit of questioning reality as frequently as possible, because you'll keep this habit in your dreams as well.

  • have a strong intention to lucid dream and to remember your dreams as you go to sleep. just tell yourself repeatedly "I'll have a lucid dream and remember my dreams" and really imagine yourself having a lucid dream, and plan ahead what you'd do if you become lucid.

  • read a lot of material about the topic when you can and if you're genuinely interested in how deep the rabbit hole goes. a great book not many people know about but is extremely valuable for establishing a lucid dream practice: [http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Tibetan-Yogas-Dream-Sleep/dp/1559391014] The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep

  • discuss your adventures on reddit :)
u/napjerks · 3 pointsr/LucidDreaming

It's just a dream tracker and a dream diary. I keep two different "collections" as bullet journal calls it. A collection (or page) starts as just an open two page spread in your journal. Start on the left side, add a title at the top and start writing. And the cool part is you reserve the first two to four pages of the journal as a topic page or table of contents. Then go and put a note on the T.O.C. page at the front of the journal so you can remember what page it's on. For your collection if you need more pages than that, you just go to the next blank open two pages and add those page numbers next to the topic on the index page. It's really easy and as an organizational system you can apply it to anything you're trying to keep track of.

You don't have to buy that specific journal BTW, admittedly it's kind of expensive ($24 US) but it's really nice quality plus it has the instructions/guide to how to use it in the back. But you can grab any old journal lying around the house and watch their YouTube videos to get the strategy.

So the first collection (page, spread, whatever you want to call it) is just titled "Dream Journal" at the top. Write today's date and quick notes on what the dream was about. I'm much more minimal than the fancy handwriting and elaboration example here. But I'm kind of OCD when it comes to lists and things. It helps me get it out of my head and relax but still be able to remember important details if I want to review them again later.

The second one to start is a "Lucid Dream Log" or tracker or whatever you want to call it. Start another two page spread. Make a straight list of the dates of the month down the left side of the page. It's also helpful to write the first letter of the day of the week just on the left or right side of the numbers. Sundays and Mondays I'm always thinking about work so it rarely happens then. Those kinds of things are helpful to notice so you don't get stressed out about it not happening "every day" possible. And I mark an X if I had one and next to it what reality checked worked. I have shorthand for my common ones, otherwise I write it out if something new happened and I that helps me remember it to see if that will work again. Usually it doesn't but hey. It helped me discover I can recognize a dream just by it being a strange scenario. For example looking at my hands never worked. But situations/context and the "this is so odd" feeling help me snap to.

If you've noticed other areas of your life or routine that either positively or negative affect your L.D. ability you can add a tracker for that. Kind of silly but say spicy food helps. You can start another two page spread, add the title to the T.O.C. and write another list of the days of the month down the left side, add the letter of the days of the week. Then add a column for "ate spicy food". Add any other columns that might also apply like gym, running, meditate, PMR, and put an x in that column when you do it. You can create an "avoid" tracker for positive reinforcement as well. Like heavy foods or alcohol are good to avoid in my opinion. They both inhibit remembering dreams and make falling right into a hard sleep a problem. So if you have a drink on Friday don't beat yourself up if you don't LD that night or even the next. Same thing if you eat a whole pizza (which I have done many times). Habit trackers are really easy and helpful in the BuJo (bullet journal, aka bullet points, aka fast journaling) system.

Even just doing the journaling and thinking about dreaming kind of makes it more accessible and vivid. If you haven't already read any books on the subject check out ones like Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming. Anything that is interesting and keeps your mind on it in an entertaining, fun, lighthearted way. Hope this helps! That was kind of a lot... :(

u/RenderEngine · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

There is a sticky post when you visit the sub

---

Also :

All about Lucid Dreams. How to, sǝɔuǝıɹǝdxǝ, etc.

Please take discussions of the paranormal such as astral projection someplace else. Binaural beats are also inappropriate. Let's keep this in the realm of science.

Welcome to r/LucidDreaming! Please check out the sidebar and Wiki before posting.


***

  • Quickstart Guide for Beginners - Know this stuff before you post!


  • Frequently Asked Questions

  • An excellent Podcast by TheLucidSage

    ***

    Rules


  • . Be nice to everyone!

  • 1. All posts must be related to Lucid Dreaming!
    • 1a. No posts regarding just the paranormal. There's /r/astralprojection (among others) for that.
    • 1b. No posts just about dreams. There's /r/dreams and /r/thisdreamihad

  • 2. No advertising!

    ***

    Related Subreddits


  • The everything about dreaming multireddit!

  • Teaching Kids to Lucid Dream

  • Lucid Dreaming Memes

  • SleepParalysis

  • Lucid Dreaming Speculation

  • Dreams


    ***

    Some good ןɐıɹoʇnʇ links


  • Finger Induced Lucid Dreaming This appears to be the biggest improvement in lucid dreaming techniques in a long time. Be sure to give it a try.

  • Dream Views A good fairly comprehensive guide. There's also a great message board and an online dream journal.

  • LD4all A message board, it's got solid information and good community.

  • All Day Awareness is a great approach. it is effort intensive, but pay back in lucid dreams and more awareness in life.

  • This FAQ was produced by the Lucidity Institute. It's not pretty, but is based on solid science.

    For when you are ready to obsess


  • Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming is THE book on Lucid Dreaming. "A Course in Lucid Dreaming" is the most thorough lucid dream training tutorial with lots of charts for you to keep track of your progress. (No link right now.)


    ***

    Lucid Dreaming Acronyms


    LD - Lucid Dreaming - Being aware that you are dreaming while in a dream.


    RC - Reality Check - A test to establish whether you are in a dream or waking life, actively done during the day in hopes that the habit will continue within dreams.


    DC - Dream Character - Any personality you encounter other than yourself...well, occasionally it can also be yourself.

    WBTB-Wake Back To Bed - Waking up for 20-30 minutes, then going back to bed increases the chances of lucid dreaming. Use that time to read about lucid dreaming or plan your dreams, and make your intention solid. Can be combined with other techniques.


    MILD - Mnemonically Induced Lucid Dream - In short, MILD is telling yourself as you are in bed ready to sleep that you are going to become lucid when you dream, then visualizing yourself in a dream becoming lucid. Repeat until you fall asleep.

    WILD - Wake-Induced Lucid Dream - A technique in which you maintain consciousness while your body falls asleep. Not for the squeamish.

    FILD - Finger-Induced Lucid Dream - A technique using subtle finger movements as you fall asleep.

    SSILD - Sense-Induced Lucid Dream - A technique where you use awareness of your various senses as you cycle through them while falling asleep.

    False Awakening - False Awakening is in essence just dreaming that you woke up, only to usually immediately after either actually wake or have another dream of waking up from the previous dreams. Those can often happen multiple times in sequence. It can be a bit jarring but also fun. If those happen often use it to do a reality check every time you wake up (or think you do).

    SP - Sleep Paralysis - A natural, safe part of the process of falling asleep which causes you to be unable to move your body. The paralysis process happens to you every time you go to sleep. When you WILD and experience SP, you are conscious while it happens. Sometimes you may be visited by the dream transition buddies--relax and enjoy the show until you can interact with your environment. Attempting to induce SP is NOT required to achieve lucidity.


u/WHISPER_ME_STEAMKEYS · 3 pointsr/LucidDreaming

All about Lucid Dreams. How to, sǝɔuǝıɹǝdxǝ, etc.

Please take discussions of the paranormal such as astral projection someplace else. Binaural beats are also inappropriate. Let's keep this in the realm of science.

Welcome to r/LucidDreaming! Please check out the sidebar and Wiki before posting.


***

  • Quickstart Guide for Beginners - Know this stuff before you post!


  • Frequently Asked Questions

  • An excellent Podcast by TheLucidSage

    ***

    Rules


  • . Be nice to everyone!

  • 1. All posts must be related to Lucid Dreaming!
    • 1a. No posts regarding just the paranormal. There's /r/astralprojection (among others) for that.
    • 1b. No posts just about dreams. There's /r/dreams and /r/thisdreamihad

  • 2. No advertising!

    ***

    Related Subreddits


  • The everything about dreaming multireddit!

  • Teaching Kids to Lucid Dream

  • Lucid Dreaming Memes

  • SleepParalysis

  • Lucid Dreaming Speculation

  • Dreams


    ***

    Some good ןɐıɹoʇnʇ links


  • Finger Induced Lucid Dreaming This appears to be the biggest improvement in lucid dreaming techniques in a long time. Be sure to give it a try.

  • Dream Views A good fairly comprehensive guide. There's also a great message board and an online dream journal.

  • LD4all A message board, it's got solid information and good community.

  • All Day Awareness is a great approach. it is effort intensive, but pay back in lucid dreams and more awareness in life.

  • This FAQ was produced by the Lucidity Institute. It's not pretty, but is based on solid science.

    For when you are ready to obsess


  • Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming is THE book on Lucid Dreaming. "A Course in Lucid Dreaming" is the most thorough lucid dream training tutorial with lots of charts for you to keep track of your progress. (No link right now.)


    ***

    Lucid Dreaming Acronyms


    LD - Lucid Dreaming - Being aware that you are dreaming while in a dream.


    RC - Reality Check - A test to establish whether you are in a dream or waking life, actively done during the day in hopes that the habit will continue within dreams.


    DC - Dream Character - Any personality you encounter other than yourself...well, occasionally it can also be yourself.

    WBTB-Wake Back To Bed - Waking up for 20-30 minutes, then going back to bed increases the chances of lucid dreaming. Use that time to read about lucid dreaming or plan your dreams, and make your intention solid. Can be combined with other techniques.


    MILD - Mnemonically Induced Lucid Dream - In short, MILD is telling yourself as you are in bed ready to sleep that you are going to become lucid when you dream, then visualizing yourself in a dream becoming lucid. Repeat until you fall asleep.

    WILD - Wake-Induced Lucid Dream - A technique in which you maintain consciousness while your body falls asleep. Not for the squeamish.

    FILD - Finger-Induced Lucid Dream - A technique using subtle finger movements as you fall asleep.

    SSILD - Sense-Induced Lucid Dream - A technique where you use awareness of your various senses as you cycle through them while falling asleep.

    False Awakening - False Awakening is in essence just dreaming that you woke up, only to usually immediately after either actually wake or have another dream of waking up from the previous dreams. Those can often happen multiple times in sequence. It can be a bit jarring but also fun. If those happen often use it to do a reality check every time you wake up (or think you do).

    SP - Sleep Paralysis - A natural, safe part of the process of falling asleep which causes you to be unable to move your body. The paralysis process happens to you every time you go to sleep. When you WILD and experience SP, you are conscious while it happens. Sometimes you may be visited by the dream transition buddies--relax and enjoy the show until you can interact with your environment. Attempting to induce SP is NOT required to achieve lucidity.


u/IDangleFreely · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

As far as the Galantamine and Choline go, very little health risks.

Galantamine hydrobromide is in fact a treatment for Alzheimers, due to it being a acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. What this means is that it slows down the chemical breakdown of acetylcholine, a compound associated with memory, the more acetylcholine in the body, the better the memory (Not strictly true but for simplicity's sake it is for this explanation).

When using Galantamine during the Wake-Back-To-Bed method, for example after 4-5 hours sleep (surpassing the deep wave/non-REM sleep) causes an increase in awareness and vividness of the dream during the longer periods of REM sleep. This highly contributes to the chances of having a lucid dream when taking it combined with WBTB.

Galantamine is a stimulant, and some people report having a lot of trouble getting back to sleep after taking it and causing insomnia for a portion of the night. What I will be doing is taking the supplements when I wake up, and falling back to sleep after taking them before they start to take effect. A few other people have done this with good results, either falling straight into rapid sleep paralysis and then into a WILD, or a DILD within minutes of falling asleep.

Choline Bitartrate when used in conjunction with Galantamine is said to increase the chance of becoming lucid by a large majority, as the Choline increases the amount of Acetylcholine in your body.

It takes the body around 48 hours to clear out the Galantamine from your system, so it's recommended to not use more than once every few days to a week, to lower the chances of building up a tolerance to it and the effects becoming less potent.

Side effects that people have reported have been the insomnia as mentioned before, slight heartburn in the morning, and an increase in appetite upon waking.

If you're interested in supplements I highly recommend Advanced Lucid Dreaming by Thomas Yuschak. He goes over the supplements available and the best way to make it the most effective.

I have high hopes for the Galantamine and Choline combo, many members on the thread I linked in my last post have had around a 90-100% success rate while taking it during WBTB. Well worth a read.

On the app, I used it a few times to record my sleep patterns, and i'm still trying to figure out how to understand the graph fully, but I will continue using it.

Another app i'm using is Sleep as an droid. Very similar, but this app has an alarm that you set the time you want to wake up for, and it figures out the best time for you to go to sleep so that you wake up coming out of REM, so you're feeling more refreshed and are able to recall more of your dreams. So i'll be using the both at the moment so I can analyse from both graphs how best to utilise WBTB.

Good luck, and as always, if you have any questions at all about lucidity just hit me up with an orangered!

u/1mjtaylor · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

I became lucid in a dream recently with a nose pinch. It was a nightmare and it occurred to me that I might be dreaming. I nose-pinched and breathed normally. I was very grateful for that bout of lucidity. It's the only time I have been aware that an RC led to lucidity, but I can't tell that it doesn't occur more often because many of my lucid dreams seem to just start lucid, but if I think back it seems that I must have been dreaming when I became lucid but I don't recall how ... considering that I don't remember all my dreams, by far (2 a night, usually), I am sure there are many other lucid dreams that I simply don't remember. I awakened two days ago after a WBTB that had seemed to fail, as I couldn't remember any lucid dreams when I woke up, but as I was recording one of my ordinary dreams I suddenly remembered a lucid dream! I have no doubt that many others are forgotten.

Do the RCs, they will help ... and do the other practices that are pertinent to training your brain to lucid dream.

Dream_Hacker mentions LaBerge's book, and I would also refer you to Daniel Love's "Are You Dreaming? Exploring Lucid Dreams: A Comprehensive Guide." It really
is* comprehensive.

You can get it here: https://www.amazon.com/Are-You-Dreaming-Exploring-Comprehensive/dp/0957497709 ...

You can also watch some of Daniel Love's videos to get a sense of whether you respond well to his style. I have had a recent success using a couple of his videos during a WBTB attempt. His YT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJaUAmw7TCFXBwAULWZwslA.

I also like Tipharot's videos ... I watched one of his videos (How To Lucid Dream In 5 Minutes) for the first time about 2 weeks ago, did what he said in the video and had a nice long lucid that very night. Check him out: https://www.youtube.co/watch?v=WBHhOrqQKUw.

It takes more than 5 minutes, of course, but I had been practicing a lot of what he said to do already.

One of things I learned from Tipharot is that meditation is best done within a couple of hours of going to bed.

It has been established by scientific research that meditators have more lucid dreams than non-meditators, but doing it later in the evening was new for me - and the first time I mediated late, I had a lucid dream.

There are, btw, lots of styles of meditation, but I've read that for LD purposes, mindful breathing is one of the most effective styles.

u/Zossimov · 3 pointsr/LucidDreaming

I'm glad you're enjoying the book and that it's helping you on the way to ADA! I didn't post it earlier in the daily thread since I got sidetracked by different things and it slipped out of my mind.

While we're on the subject, I've got couple of more resources regarding mindfulness meditation that might be interesting.

The first one is a comprehensive book on meditation called The mind illuminated which offers a step by step process of how to meditate and provides plenty of answers for a novice meditator. It helped me a great deal in the beginning since I didn't know what to expect or what to think of certain emotions that I was having while meditating - for example, bliss, the slight feeling of disgust or disassociation from certain things. Without knowing what to think of them, I was surprised at first that such emotions can well up inside me while meditating - "trying to relax" in my mind - but reading through that book and "Mindfulness in plain English" made me realise that meditation is an active introspective attention that shines a light on one's thoughts and emotions. The goal of meditation is not the removal of such emotions or thoughts, it's their understanding through purposive attention. I would highly recommend it for someone starting out with meditation with the caveat that it could be "too good" of a guide, as it is very structured and after a while that can be one of its cons.

Another resource worth looking into is that of Open Monitoring Meditation. What surprised me in the beginning and still does to this day, are the numerous variations on meditation and what those entail. Open Monitoring for me is a natural progression of the meditative practice I'm doing while seated for 20-25 minutes a day in meditation. I start out by paying attention to my breath, noticing the sensation of breathing in, holding the breath for a split second and then breathing out. Noticing whether I take a long, deep breath from my diaphragm or a shallow breath from my chest. Ask myself at first: Do I feel a certain tension in my chest, neck or shoulders? Then I start to pay attention to my mind and what thoughts arise within it - is it a compulsive thought on posting to reddit something I forgot, maybe or that job interview I'm going to have later in the day? After that, in whatever I do or think I ask myself "Is this worth thinking/doing?" if it is then I ask myself "How well am I doing this? Could I improve on it somehow?". The latter questions aren't meant to be judgemental, in my opinion, rather they should bring your attention and awareness to the thing that you are doing whatever that might be, walking, reading or writing a post on the sub. To me there are plenty of parallels between Open Monitoring and ADA, perhaps they are based upon the same body of practices and motivations or perhaps they are referring to the same thing but in a different language?

Either way, I highly recommend looking into it. Here's a scientific paper I found on a quick search that investigates Open Monitoring Meditation and two other forms of meditation, giving a pretty good overview picture of the three and their uses to the everyday meditator.

Hope it helps and I'll keep posting such resources whenever I come across more!

u/not_mad_just_upset · 3 pointsr/LucidDreaming

The first thing I would suggest is to slow down :)

Lucid dreaming is a fairly deep topic to just jump right into. A lot of people discover it and become super excited, but ultimately lose focus and stop trying altogether. The best thing you could do right now is start reading and taking in as much information as you possibly can in an organized manner.

I'd suggest visiting this site and completing the tutorial section. It explains one of the most common ways to achieve lucidity in a friendly, easy-to-read way. Buy or somehow "obtain" Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming by Stephen Laberge. It's a bit "out there" at times, but maintains a down-to-Earth feel more often than not.

Try to recall at least two dreams a night, but it sounds like you've got that down already. On that website, you'll learn that it's important/helpful to go back and rewrite the end of your dreams to include a section where you realize you're dreaming and become lucid (for whatever reason.)

Practice reality checks, but don't just go:

> Am I dreaming?

Do something along the lines of:

> Am I dreaming? What have I done in the last half-hour? What did I do before that? What did I have for breakfast?

If you practice the latter enough you'll eventually do the same in a dream.

Read your dream journals or read other peoples' lucid dreams and use that as inspiration to keep up your reality checks.

And have fun! Don't be discouraged if it takes you a day, week, or month to have your first lucid dream; Stephen Laberge said some of his students have taken a while to really master the concept, so take your time.

u/walden42 · 3 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Hey, I often have similar problems. I often have one specific recurring theme, but I actually try to make the most of it. If you we have troubles like this repeatedly during the night, this means we most likely have them during the day, too. They're somewhere there in the back of our minds. Lucid dreaming is a great way to face our problems and learn to accept them and get over them. It's best while dreaming to save us the trouble from having to face them in real life, so it's a real advantage.

Strive to become lucid during such a dream (I have yet to) and ask the characters you have trouble with what the problem is. Talk to them. Make friends with them. Get at the very root of the problem, whatever it is. Ask the dream to help you overcome it. Eventually with determination you'll be able to completely overcome the mental problem both in the dream and waking world.

I strongly recommend this book for further reading on how we can improve ourselves and overcome all our mental problems while sleeping. It's a really fantastic book.

Good luck, and try not to run away from your fears, but face them boldly!

u/Aaronneyer · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

Awareness is always necessary for proper lucid dreaming, but if you want a boost, there are supplements which can greatly help with lucid dreaming. Check out the book "Advanced Lucid Dreaming: The Power of Supplements".

If you don't want to read a book, try just buying this off Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Dream-Leaf-Supplement-Experience-Revolution/dp/B00IP25N20
It contains two pills. A blue pill Mugwort and 5-HTP which promotes restful deep sleep and can cause REM Rebound effect. The red pill Huperzine-A, DHEA, and Choline, which help in raising your ACh levels and keeping them up there to help you stay aware in your sleep and have more vivid lucid dreams. You take the blue pill when you go to sleep, then wake up after 4 hours, take the red pill and go back to sleep.

Keep in mind, these supplements will not by themselves give you lucid dreams, they will just help you get there. It still will take practice, awareness, and intentions to properly lucid dream.

u/isuarez · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

Going to echo what many are saying: start journaling your dreams and working on your dream recall. If you like to write them down keep pen and paper by your bedside. You can also type them into your phone if that’s easier but keep your screen brightness way down. I recommend writing rather than the phone as the screen might wake you up too much to go back to sleep quickly if it’s one of your first dreams in the night.

Also suggest getting a book to begin your journey. My personal fav is the Field Guide to Lucid Dreaming: A Field Guide to Lucid Dreaming: Mastering the Art of Oneironautics https://www.amazon.com/dp/0761177396/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_nYyJBbD9Q2VSD

But an essential that is also fantastic is Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming: Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming https://www.amazon.com/dp/034537410X/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_VZyJBbDYD9XR9

Have patience and enjoy the growth :)

u/ConvictedConvict · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

This sounds like a really cool idea, I wish there would have been a LD club at my high school!

Make sure you require your members to keep dream journals, and take a few minutes to let people share something out of their DJs if they would like to.

I don't see how this could ever go stale. People are always dreaming every night, so as long as you're recording them, you will always have something to talk about.

Also, maybe have this also be a sort of book club, where you assign Lucid Dreaming specific reading material and then discuss whatever chapters you assigned that week. Here is a link to Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming by Stephen Laberge, which is also linked in the sidebar. I am about half way through and it is very informative and has helped me a lot, 9/10 would definitely recommend. It can also be found as a PDF, which can be viewed and downloaded for free here.

Also, encourage your fellow students to come check out this sub!

Good luck man, I hope this comes through for you, very cool idea.

u/DormiensVigila108 · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Two books that I highly recommend if you're delving into the more transcendental aspects of lucid dreaming and looking to hone your skills:

The Tibetan Yogas of Sleep and Dreams - Tibetan Buddhists of the Dzogchen school have a tradition of lucid dreaming that spans millenia, they believe that in the dreamless sleep that the "clear light of consciousness" is revealed. It was one of the most powerful texts that I have read, especially given my own LD experiences. They say that for highly skilled lifetime practitioners that every dream is lucid, sleep stops "being sleep" but instead becomes a dissolution of ego and nightly transcendence. Fascinating stuff.

I also highly recommend The Lucid Dreamer: A Waking Guide for the Traveler Between Worlds. It is incredibly well written, full of full color photos, and exercises. It discusses not just techniques from all over the globe for LD induction and preservation, but also discusses at length the science, history, and cultural significance of dreaming throughout time. It explores the use of LDs by shamans, Sufi mystics, the Prophet Muhammad, Australian indigenous peoples, and a ton more. I still keep this book by my bed a year after finishing it; amazingly helpful.

Both books can be had on Amazon used for ~$5 each. Absolutely worth it. Especially since reading about LDing before bed is one of the best ways to trigger an LD.

u/tinybird · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

for me, if i am reading a book on lucid dreaming, even during the daytime, then i am more likely to remember more and more detailed dreams. I would usually read 1 chapter a day. it seems like this keeps dreams/dreaming on your mind, which strengthens your intent, and improves recall.
also even just reading a good fiction book before bed seems to enhance my dream memory. maybe it's just that reading right before bed substitutes sitting in front of a laptop or TV before bed. or maybe it just exercises the minds creative muscle.
I know getting enough sleep is also an important factor.
Also, for those interested in vitamins/supplements i recommend Advanced Lucid Dreaming: The Power of Supplements
i personally like 5-htp.

u/Psyagan · 4 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Sorry, I hope I didn't come across hostile. I didn't really like that book but that may just be because I've been spoilt by reading so many better books, it's probably quite interesting to someone who's not heard all this stuff before.

Yes jargon is a bit of a curse. Someone started a thread asking something similar earlier but they deleted it, so I'll just copy and paste my suggestions here...

There's no one-best-guide but there's a lot of trash.
IMHO you probably want to get about 2/3 books to get a balanced learning.

I'd recommend these:


Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming?
http://www.amazon.com/Exploring-World-Dreaming-Stephen-LaBerge/dp/034537410X/ref=pd_sim_b_2

Are You Dreaming? Exploring lucid dreams, a comprehensive guide http://www.amazon.com/dp/0957497709/ref=cm_sw_su_dp

Advanced Lucid Dreaming: the power of supplements

http://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Lucid-Dreaming-Power-Supplements/dp/1430305428/ref=pd_sim_b_4

The Conscious Exploration of Dreaming
http://www.amazon.com/Conscious-Exploration-Dreaming-Discovering-Control/dp/1585005398/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1381059873&sr=1-1&keywords=conscious+exploration+of+dreaming

First two are must reads, third is useful if you're interested in supplements, fourth is less of a guide but has some useful info. The author Ryan Hurd does some good e-books too.

A lot of the other books out there are really dumbed down or get all wishy-washy and paranormal. Oh and don't bother with "learn to lucid dream in 30 days" or most of the other cheap e-books as you'll only end up wasting your money.

u/CivilBrocedure · 7 pointsr/LucidDreaming

"The dream is short and life is long, besides that there is no difference. They are both products of the same Mind." - Sri Ramana Maharshi.

Many Tibetan yogis who have mastered lucid dreaming and dream yoga describe life and dreams as a constant show, passing before a non-attached spectator. For them, the mastery of lucidity is not for dream control, it is about maintenance of lucidity in the non-dream states of deep sleep; what they refer to as "The Clear Light of Consciousness." It is a mastery in knowing the mind, a non-ego attached ball of conscious awareness devoid of thought and sensory input. You have been given a gift, why not use it to better understand what human consciousness is? I recommend reading "The Tibetan Yogas of Sleep and Dream" by Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche.

Conversely, if you seek to have the dreams retreat, the only real solution I know of that still provides a restful sleep is cannabis consumption before bed. It impairs deep REM sleep and will prevent you from having anything resembling a deep dream.

u/Frater_DIPL · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

Hey Centurion,

Long story short yes.

When I was about 24 I got the notion that I needed to understand this Lucid Dreaming business. I got Stephen Laberge's book and got to work. It took maybe three months but I finally started to LD. Once this started happening, naturally I wanted to push the envelope. If I can control my dreams I thought, maybe I could even control what they would be about.

So, what I did was recited a sort of mantra in my head which outlined the desire to Lucid Dream about a certain thing or concept:

"I will have a Lucid Dream about x."

"I will control my dreams."

"I will remember my dreams when I awake."

I chanted something along these lines before going to bed each night. I think it was the third night, I manifested the dream I desired. After that phase of Lucid Dreaming in my life, it never happened again. I can't even LD anymore. However, I was able to do just what you are asking.

-Kadel

u/Pandas_UNITE · 3 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Here is what I did recently, I got my free one month audible membership. And downloaded this audiobook regarding Tibetan Dream Yoga. I've been listening to it many times over while I drive. I've been experiencing boosts in mindfulness and lucid dreams. I meditated for only the 2nd time in a dream (while flying, legs crossed, dream eyes closed momentarily). It was one of my more amazing experiences in a dream. Good luck.
http://www.amazon.com/Dream-Yoga-Tibetan-Awakening-Dreaming/dp/B00FQR51YW/ref=tmm_aud_title_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=&qid=

u/tofur99 · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Multiple effortless WILDs when I hadn't even come close for years beforehand, crazy and powerful dreams both lucid and non-lucid. They have an impact, they aren't magic pills that'll get you lucid every time if you don't do any LD work/prep but for experienced practicing LD'ers they get a legit 80-90% success rate from them, they increase awareness and memory in dreams.

Can get both off amazon. Also good to take some choline along with. Start with 4mg Galantamine, 300mg GPC, 250-400mg choline then if that doesn't do it for ya double them all. Take at least a night or two off in between doses to avoid tolerance buildup, take during wbtb.

https://www.amazon.com/Alpha-Choline-Supplement-Pharmaceutical-Capsules/dp/B00XWQSD7G/ref=sr_1_4_s_it?s=hpc&ie=UTF8&qid=1493492389&sr=1-4&keywords=alpha+gpc

https://www.amazon.com/Relentless-Improvement-Galantamine/dp/B00NEQ9MVA/ref=sr_1_2?s=hpc&ie=UTF8&qid=1493492420&sr=1-2-spons&keywords=galantamine&psc=1

u/mzrosy · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

I agree with /u/blitz372 that maybe the darkness can alert you to the fact that you are dreaming. Also, the vacuum idea sounds fun.

My dreams are sometimes dark too and, although I have not changed that aspect, I have successfully changed disproportionate settings. I have a tendency to enter small spaces in dreams, which I now recognize as a dream sign and make larger so I can pass through.

Chapter 6 of Stephen la Berge's book, Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming, gives advice on how to influence the environment at will such as manipulating small details then working up to greater changes and imagining the dream on a TV screen with the remote in your hand. See what works for you.

u/p3ndulum · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Most of my lucid dreams generally happen on days where I simply refuse to get out of bed, really.

I'll get up, go pee, go back to sleep, roll around for a bit, falling in and out of sleep, and then eventually just find myself in a dream.

I think, though, like bobbaphet said, more important than keeping a dream journal, even, is that you buy into the fact that reaching a lucid state is possible for you, and then do your best to avoid getting disappointed or discouraged just because you didn't have one last night.

I know some fortunate people who say that they have lucid dreams just about every night and didn't even know what they were called until I brought the subject up. But for the rest of us, there isn't really a reliable switch to turn them on and off.

If you're still set on achieving a lucid state, I would recommend getting Lucid Dreaming: Gateway to the Inner Self by Robert Waggoner and read a couple of pages or a chapter or two before you go to sleep every night. He covers different methods for inducing LDs, all of the different things newbies struggle with and should look for, and there are a ton of his own personal experiences journalled in the book.

It was the first and only book I've read on the topic, and I started having my first LDs within 2 months after I started it.

Otherwise, maybe just try to clear your mind of the topic the best you can. Sometimes when you're in the dark, things are a little more clear when you're not* trying to look right at them.

u/mackwon · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Besides methods, you should try to focus more awareness while awake on reality checks. School won't be on your mind anymore and so just focus all that energy towards the checks. I have a combination of letters/words on my wrist that works for me. The more your mind is focused on lucid dreaming, the more likely the chances of triggering one. I would maybe suggest a book to read based on lucid dreaming.

For me, the easiest way to trigger a LD is to set an alarm to wake up during a long REM cycle and then take a nap later on. Naps always give me some intense dreams.

Last option I can think of is to take some nootropics/supplements. I can attest to them increasing the oddity of dreams while being more aware to cause a reality check. I find the way nootropics make free dreaming so wonky more fun than LD'ing itself sometimes.

u/Ktashi · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

Laberge is great, and everyone interested in dreaming should read his books. Another title that is a little easier to read and less technical, but no no less helpful is “Are You Dreaming by Daniel Love

Are You Dreaming

If you are interested in supplements like Galantamine, the ONLY book to read is

“Advanced Lucid Dreaming: The Power of Supplements” by Thomas Yushack’s
Advanced Lucid Dreaming: The Power of Supplements

u/Flagg707 · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Galantamine should not be used every night. Tolerance does build up, plus it can have some pretty strong effects on some people (in terms of restless sleep or unable to get back to sleep).

If you are interested in the supplement route for lucid dreaming, I'd suggest you find a copy of Thomas Yuschak's "Advanced Lucid Dreaming" (http://www.amazon.com/dp/1430305428). It is one of the best studies I've seen to date on the topic.

I might also strongly suggest checking out some of the longer-established lucid dreaming forums, such as Dreamviews, and check some of the threads on Galantamine.

u/vangoughwasaboss · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

> but I struggle with the wbtb and can’t resist the urge to move so i fail at lucid dreaming

Just keep focusing on remaining still and eyes closed when waking up and hold onto the last dream. It's legitimately just habit building here, we've spent our whole lives not doing this so you have to be persistent for awhile.

Eventually you'll automatically stay still w/ eyes closed and mentally play over the dream you just exited as you lay there, grab the journal that's within easy reach and jot down enough to later jog that memory that you made by replaying the dream while initially awake.

edit: I'm in the beginning part of this book and it's really good, you should read it

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0738751448/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/vanomus · 4 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Advanced Lucid Dreaming: The Power of Supplements I found this book a little easier to digest then trawling though 1000 anecdotal forum posts. It has some interesting information on how each suppliment effects brain function. My own experience is that all of these suppliments do have an effect on recal, but none are magic pills. I can't argue with my own dream diary though, as I record what suppliments I've taken on that day/morning. Choline is almost always at the top of my page describing a successful lucid, and as it's essential for memory, this is no suprise. Galantamine has given me concious awareness in the least vivid dreams I can actually recal, including dreams with no colour. Very strange.

u/4plus1 · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

>Im not entirely sure if they are 'Lucid', I control what I do and say, but i'm not really aware that i'm dreaming until I wake up.

If you're not aware you're dreaming, you're not having lucid dreams.

According to Stephen LaBerge, waking up during the night (even multiple times) is completely normal and it happens to everyone - most people just don't remember in the morning.

Sounds to me that you're just blessed/cursed with very vivid dreams and exceptional dream recall. Here's an idea: Why not use what you already have and learn how to lucid dream properly? Keep a dream diary and do reality checks in your daily life. Maybe also buy one of LaBerge's books (http://www.amazon.com/Exploring-World-Dreaming-Stephen-Laberge/dp/034537410X)?

Then, when you're lucid dreaming the next time, shape your dream world to be more relaxing/calm/stable (a tibetan temple on top of a snowy mountain?). I'm sure you'll feel less fatigued in the morning.

u/kami_nl · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

I have no experience with SP, but I have made the experience that opening my eyes (in a lucid dream) makes me open my eyes in real, too. Have you ever tried to imagine a dream scenario during SP, or imagine that you are entering a dream?

LaBerge says the following about sleep paralysis:
> ...People in these states commonly try to cry out for others to awaken them, or to force themselves to move in order to awaken. This usually only makes matters worse, however, since it increases their feelings of anxiety. Anxiety itself may help to perpetuate the condition. A better approach is to (1) remember it is a dream and therefore harmless, and (2) relax, and go with the experience. Adopt an attitude of intrepid curiosity. Dreams that proceed from paralysis experiences are often quite intense and wonderful.

u/OsakaWilson · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

At one point I read pretty much everything that was released on the topic at the time. The most digestible book I read on the topic was The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep.

It was a while back, but the visualizations were not so useful to me. VILD never worked so well for me either, so that's just me. Having different parts of the night take on different themes, I really go something out of. For example, after waking up between midnight and morning, you engage the feeling of "wrath" (which from their description seems closer to extreme bravery) while going back into a dream. From the posts, this is something that a whole lot of people could benefit from.

u/consciousjohnson · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

I've having pretty incredible success with Dream Leaf. They do sell on Amazon too. Hope this helps!

Here's the link:

http://www.amazon.com/Dream-Leaf-Supplement-Experience-Revolution/dp/B00IP25N20/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1410494708&sr=8-1&keywords=dream+leaf

PS. Have you tried lucid dreaming supplements before?

u/09112001 · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

http://www.amazon.com/Lucidimine-Galantamine-Induction-Nootropic-Supplement/dp/B00IJQCA6E

It's one of the best known lucid inducing supplements ever known. Good reviews on amazon, heralded in most LD forums as working well. Basically you take it while going for a WBTB and it increases your chance of either WILD or DILD significantly.

u/ProdigalD · 7 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Okay, I'm digging deep to feel sympathy, sister, because you have a brain a lot of us (for example: me!) would kill for. And you find it annoying.

But I see that your suffering is real. And I have some advice that I truly believe will help you.

I don't know how to change your brain into a non-lucid dreaming model. But experience, including suffering, is all about how you frame it. So instead of trying to make lucid dreaming go away, I suggest that you turn this negative experience into a positive one by changing what lucid dreaming means to you.

Read this book to learn how to control your lucid dreams and use them to have adventures and explore creativity:

https://www.amazon.com/Exploring-World-Dreaming-Stephen-LaBerge/dp/034537410X

Read this book to turn lucid dreaming into a spiritual experience that deepens meditation:

https://www.amazon.com/Dream-Yoga-Illuminating-Through-Dreaming/dp/1622034597/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_14_t_0?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=SWEFST6G5DJKYNVB6DDT

Good luck.

u/xplosiw · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

I have a REM Dreamer Pro mask which does this, it detects your REM sleep cycles and plays sounds which you can define. It also flashes lights.

I can actually buy a pillow stereo for a good price (such as this one) and have the REM Dreamer sleeping mask detect when I'm sleeping then send a signal to my laptop which reads the signal and plays isochronic beats or whatever audio I want to play. It could be really powerful when combined with flashing lights and stuff.

u/runningscared · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Wow great stuff. I'd also suggest Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge to anyone interested in lucid dreaming.

u/thatkiddonny · 4 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Doing more RC's isn't going to help that much. They are mostly to use to reaffirm you are dreaming after you have realized you are dreaming. In fact I haven't done an RC in a dream. I've also read that asking dream characters if you are dreaming is unreliable, though I'm sure its a person to person thing.

Though, make sure you make them at regular intervals and not at random. I set an hourly alarm on my phone to just buzz and let me know.

And everyone has a hard time in their infancy of actual lucid dreams. It really just takes practice.

Something I started doing was, what I believe is called, Lucid Living. Its where you take time out of your day and just realize reality. Realize you can realize. Take in as many details as you can. I was having a hard time having my first LD, but after I started this I had my first 3 in the next week or two, but sadly school started and I haven't had the time for Lucid Dreaming.

Another thing that helps is read something about lucid dreaming before bed. Get into the mind set. Pick up Stephen LaBerge's book Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming, lots of helpful and basic stuff in there.

If you need to know anything else you can PM me, I spent a good chunk of my summer basically researching this stuff.

u/Oregon_Orbit · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

I have not, but a lucid dreamer named Robert Waggoner talks about his experience in his book, Lucid Dreaming . It happens sometimes, and hopefully it doesn't stop you from continuing to LD. I would recommend the book to anyone who wants to learn more about the subconscious minds' role in lucid dreaming, and false awakenings as well.

u/ChangingYang · 8 pointsr/LucidDreaming

I learned about lucid dreaming about 6 years ago, I had already been doing some of it without knowing what it meant. Then I read some books like dreamgates and a book by Robert Waggoner that really helped a lot.
For me, if I set my mind to do it, it happens, but if I'm too caught up in day to day life, or even to desperate to see a lucid dream it doesn't happen.
When I'm focused I can have one or two lucid dreams a night every night. When I'm not (currently I'm not all that focused) I have maybe one a month or maybe every other month.
As far as control over the dream itself, it depends on how stable my state of mind is. Desperation and too high of expectations always kills my ability to control my dreams.

u/Strel-chan · 5 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge

I haven't personally read it (yet), but it has an excellent reputation among the lucid dreaming community. It's basically THE book for those interested in lucid dreaming.

u/Someoneoldbutnew · 3 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Check out Yoga Nidra for a systematic sleep meditation which should be conducive to LD. It's a body scan and visualization.

I've had the most epic LD's after trying the exercises from the Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep. Like the kind where you spend what seems like years of time in a few hours of sleep. This was right after coming home from retreat though, so ymmv.

The Tibetan process is a little more dogmatic (woowoo) and if you're not attuned to subtle energies it's not going to be worth your time, as it involves blocking energy channels and paying attention to chakras. Yoga Nidra is far more approachable.

It should be said that I'm far too much of a weed smoker to be deep in the LD camp, I just hang out here.

u/Johnbrousseau · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

It is a supplement that is supposed to help induce lucid dreams using the wake-back-to-bed method. I got them sorta as a gift to myself for Christmas. The lucid dream site wrote an article that gets into the nitty-gritty of what it actually does here.

u/xandercrash01 · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

Well then we are in the same boat. I'm really looking into meditation for lucid dreaming, maybe you'd wanna give it a whirl. Try Are You Dreaming? By Daniel Love which is one of my favorite books on the subject. Feel free to pm me if you want to work with somebody on LD

Edit: formatting

u/kbennett73 · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Try using something like a PillowSonic speaker. It's a super-thin speaker you place under your pillow. The sound filters up through the pillow. It's a great gadget to use for lucid dreaming audio, and it also comes in handy if you want to listen to something at night without disturbing your partner.

u/Oneireus · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

I got a book called "The Lucid Dreamer". I haven't read it yet, but it looks really good in terms of production quality. I also grabbed "The Dream Drugstore" which looks a bit into the psychology behind it. I need to add Are You Dreaming? to me list.

u/HanSmolo · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

Melatonin will promote REM sleep. That is not particularly helpful if you take it before going to bed. If you take melatonin after WBTB when you are already experiencing extended durations of REM, you'll increase the chances of going lucid and remembering. I wouldn't recommend taking it every night though. I'm not positive, but I think you could build a tolerance, and that would not be helpful. If you want to read about supplements and lucid dreaming, check out this book. The book is awesome, but it sketches me out a bit that the author's website went down a few years back and I have no idea what happened to the guy.

u/Eildosa · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

http://www.amazon.fr/Advanced-Lucid-Dreaming-Power-Supplements/dp/1430305428

some increase realism, some supress rem sleep to allow a big rem rebound in the morning, etc

Good Calea Zacatechichi is hard to find, there is 2 strain, both indistinguishable just by looking, one active and one inactive, when you buy some you never know which one you get.

u/[deleted] · 3 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Yes. If you want to know about this in depth, read Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming.

For example: You're a really good alpine skier, and you're preparing for a race. You've practiced a particular slope many times, and you're doing well. You can prepare even more by lucid dreaming, and going down the slope. It's something about the mental preparation in addition to physical preparation. Sports trainers are well aware that mental preparation (which could be had through LD) is invaluable in giving an athletic edge.

As far as other activities beyond sports, I'm not really sure. I've heard of people using LD time to study a subject (going over details or working out problems; clearly you can't learn new facts while dreaming), but since I've only had a lucid dream for a few minutes I can't personally comment.

u/larnar1309 · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

I got mine via Amazon but there are lots of different brands etc. so I’d say have a look around and see what looks best for you!

u/Kafke · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

I can answer those for you!

  1. No, I have the same problem. I hardly ever "dream" (remember my dreams). You can still lucid dream with about the same difficulty as others. The problem is experiencing (remembering) the dream itself. I've had 3 so far, and I hardly ever remember my dreams. You should keep a journal as that will help you remember. I'm not sure how the Remee factors in. I suppose it'd help you remember (seeing as you'd be concious while dreaming).

  2. While lucid, it's pretty easy to realize that everything isn't real. Levels of control are different for each person. Waking up is real easy. it's not like you are trapped or anything. In fact, the hard part is staying in the dream!

  3. I don't think any training is needed for the mask. As that's its selling point. But there is a book by Stephen Laberge called "Exploring the world of lucid dreaming" that you should read. It introduces the basic aspects of lucid dreaming.
u/montyf · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

I can assure you that you're not the only consciousness in dream-space.

You're actually at a good stage to become a more serious lucid dreamer. If you don't mind having your beliefs challenged, I would strongly recommend you read Robert Waggoner's book.

u/Elaol · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

I was talking about hormones, you need certain amounts of melatonin for proper sleep and dreams. If you are into supplements, there is a whole book on the subject http://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Lucid-Dreaming-Power-Supplements/dp/1430305428 But please inform yourself well before taking everything. Every supplement you take has some side effects, so read both good and bad sides before taking anything

u/luiggi_oasis · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

np! you'll find some articles by Laberge, he's a pioneer in studying LD from a scientific point of view... the first half of his book is based on research too, it may very well be of help for you... you can find a digital copy on the web, btw...

u/NovaGuide · 0 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Lucid dreams are about being aware, not being in control. Robert Waggoner, when describing the issue of dream control in his book, details that a dreamer controls the dream in the same way a sailor controls the sea. A partial lucid dream would actually be one in which the dreamer is not completely aware.

u/C_Linnaeus · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

There's actually a good book about lucid dreaming AND meditation, check out Dreaming Yourself Awake.

There's about as many meditation techniques/styles as there are forms of fitness routines, FYI.

u/Realluzion · 3 pointsr/LucidDreaming

> By remaining 'awake' in your waking life you can lead yourself to become awake in your dreams

Exactly.

You might want to look into Dream Yoga.

More specifically: Dreaming Yourself Awake, by B. Alan Wallace, and The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep, by Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche.

u/Kabur · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

Well dream sign is something what happens in your dream and couldn't happen in reality. Through these it might struck your brain that something is not right, do a RC and boom, you're LDing!
Dream signs are divided into categories:

Inner Awarness: “I’m trying to figure out where the house and furnishings are from, and I realize this is an odd thing to be
thinking about.”
“Somehow I could see perfectly without my glasses.”

Action: “I was underwater, yet I was breathing.”
“Doing pull-ups got easier and easier.”

Form: “I am a man.” (dreamed by a woman)
“Her face changes as I look at her.”
“I see a tiny purple kitten.”

Context: “I’m a commando behind enemy lines in World War II.”
“My friend is assigned to be my husband.”
“My bed was in the street.”

Source: Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge

u/Oceaniic · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

"A Field Guide to Lucid Dreaming: Mastering the Art of Oneironautics" was an awesome read! Highly suggest you check it out.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0761177396/ref=redir_mdp_mobile/183-0226440-8429971

u/Sarcasma19 · 3 pointsr/LucidDreaming

This one is generally considered the best. I think it's exactly what you're looking for. I have it and it's helped me immensely.

u/digital_excess · 17 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Nice!

Suggested reading at the end of the article is:
The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep by Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche.

Amazon Link

u/doctor_eternal · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

For me, it's Galantamine. Not 100%, but so close it's not worth mentioning. It must be used properly, though. My technique:

  1. Set your alarm for 5 hours after you go to sleep
  2. Go to bed
  3. When the alarm goes off, get up, take 4-8mg of Galantamine
  4. Stay up for 15-20 minutes
  5. Go back to bed
  6. Experience vivid, lucid dreams

    I should mention that I do spend a fair amount of time studying lucid dreaming during the day, so when the Galantamine-fueled dreams start, I recognize them right away and become lucid. I do not do any reality checks during the day.

    Here's the one I use:
    https://www.amazon.com/Relentless-Improvement-Galantamine/dp/B00NEQ9MVA/ref=sr_1_3_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1494069901&sr=8-3&keywords=Galantamine

    And the book I learned the technique from:
    https://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Lucid-Dreaming-Power-Supplements/dp/1430305428/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1494070156&sr=8-1&keywords=lucid+dreaming+supplement+book
u/rathskellar · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

Mugwort

Galantamine

Those are both shared from the Amazon app so let me know if it doesn't work.

u/DigitalMindShadow · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

For a comprehensive guide by the world's foremost lucid dream teacher and researcher, read this book and do the exercises in the accompanying guidebook.

u/PourJarsInReservoirs · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

I've been reading this book which recommends specific forms of it as part of a comprehensive lucid dreaming and spiritual path. However I haven't tried the exercises yet. It's a lot to take in and differs greatly from "secular" lucid dreaming practices.

u/przl_OM · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

Maybe you'll be interested in this book.

u/LigerRider · 2 pointsr/LucidDreaming

Read A Field Guide to Lucid Dreaming...it will teach you everything you need to know...its like going to an LD class, I imagine.

u/TresyllianCastle · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

Thanks, will check it out! I am wondering about this one too, but haven’t decided about purchasing. Do you happen to know anything about it?

Llewellyn’s Complete Book of Lucid Dreaming

u/ps-Surge · 3 pointsr/LucidDreaming

If you want to use supplements, buy high quality supplements on your own.
Buy book on supplements(yes there is one) that explains everything about them in detail and how they should be used. All of these articles take content from that book exactly.

It is available on amazon - https://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Lucid-Dreaming-Power-Supplements/dp/1430305428/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1510319420&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=lucid+dreaming+suplements+book

u/filippp · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

You can check out dream yoga if you're into this kind of thing (for example there's this book by B. Alan Wallace).

u/Sniper_Brosef · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

Can I recommend the WILD technique that was detailed in this book? I've gotten very consistent results from it but only from naps and never before actually going to bed.

u/cuntmuncha · 7 pointsr/LucidDreaming

http://www.amazon.com/Lucidimine-Galantamine-Induction-Nootropic-Supplement/dp/B00IJQCA6E

Not quite 29.99....

I don't recommend or not recommend that specific brand, Galantamine will give you lucid dreams though.

u/alphalucid · 1 pointr/LucidDreaming

You probably already have this one, but anyway. Steven Laberge

© Copyright Reddit Bests 2022 About