Best products from r/bicycling

We found 372 comments on r/bicycling discussing the most recommended products. We ran sentiment analysis on each of these comments to determine how redditors feel about different products. We found 4,254 products and ranked them based on the amount of positive reactions they received. Here are the top 20.

#PreviewProductScorePurchase
1Shimano PD-A530 SPD Dual Platform Bike PedalShimano PD-A530 SPD Dual Plat...14
2Shimano PD-M520L MTB Sport Pedals with CleatsShimano PD-M520L MTB Sport Pe...14
3Cygolite Hotshot– High Power 2 Watt Bike Taillight– 6 Night & Daytime Modes– User Tuneable Flash Speed– Compact Design– IP64 Water Resistant– Secured Hard Mount– USB Rechargeable– Great for Busy RoadsCygolite Hotshot– High Powe...14
4Kryptonite KryptoLok Series 2 Standard Heavy Duty Bicycle U Lock with 4ft Flex Bike CableKryptonite KryptoLok Series 2...13
5Delta Michelangelo Two-Bike Gravity StandDelta Michelangelo Two-Bike G...11
6Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance: The WorldZinn & the Art of Road Bike M...10
7NiteRider Cherry Bomb TaillightNiteRider Cherry Bomb Taillig...10
8Kryptonite Evolution Mini-5 Heavy Duty Bicycle U Lock Bike LockKryptonite Evolution Mini-5 H...9
9Origin8 Drop EndsOrigin8 Drop Ends8
10Delta Cycle Airzound Very Loud Bike Horn Air Hooter | Rechargeable Bell Siren Alarm Super dBDelta Cycle Airzound Very Lou...8
11Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboudit Mini Heavy Duty Bicycle U Lock Bike LockKryptonite New York Fahgettab...8
12Cycle Pro Mechanic Bicycle Repair Stand Rack BikeCycle Pro Mechanic Bicycle Re...7
13RioRand 4 Mode 1200 Lm Cree Xml T6 Bulb LED Bicycle Bike Headlight Lamp Flashlight Light HeadlampRioRand 4 Mode 1200 Lm Cree X...7
14Topeak Road Morph G Bike Pump with GaugeTopeak Road Morph G Bike Pump...7
15Zinn & the Art of Mountain Bike MaintenanceZinn & the Art of Mountain Bi...7
16Topeak Joe Blow  Sport II Floor PumpTopeak Joe Blow Sport II Flo...7
17Finish Line Dry Bicycle Chain Lube with Teflon - 4oz Squeeze BottleFinish Line Dry Bicycle Chain...7
18Satechi Bikemate Slim Case 3 for iPhone 5S, 5C, 5, 4S, 4, 3GS, 3G, BlackBerry Torch, HTC EVO, HTC Inspire 4G, HTC Sensation, Droid X, Droid Incredible, Droid 2, Droid 3, Samsung EPIC, Galaxy S2, S3Satechi Bikemate Slim Case 3 ...7
19Topeak 60102538 Hexus II Multi-ToolTopeak 60102538 Hexus II Mult...7
20Zinn & the Art of Road Bike MaintenanceZinn & the Art of Road Bike M...6

Top comments mentioning products on r/bicycling:

u/Gmbtd · 1 pointr/bicycling

Don't worry about the helmet. None are really safer than others, just lighter and stylish.

You don't mention maintenance. You'll want to start cleaning your chain really regularly. Keep it clean and lubricated and it'll last FAR longer for you. You'll probably need a new chain each year too.

You might already know all about bike maintenance, but if not, get a good thick guide like Zinn's guide to bike maintenance, and start reading. Also watch YouTube videos before you try something the first time -- it'll save you tons of pain and money!

The backpack is fine, it'll just make your back really sweaty. Panniers will fix that, not just a rack (that can work though, just get some bungee cords). Panniers and a well designed bag can be great. I have this, and it's very functional, although I hesitate to recommend it as I haven't tried any others for comparison. It clips into a rack by the same manufacturer making it trivial to hold it down.

Topeak Velcro Strap Version Dxp Trunk Bag with Rigid Molded Panels https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004WSLT2O/ref=cm_sw_r_other_awd_yxC9wb6QSPKM2

Pack a multi tool and probably two spare tubes. Patches are great, but they can't fix everything. I'd also suggest having a plan for a taxi or uber ride. You won't need it, but if you have a flat just before an important meeting, it's good to have a plan in advance.

I'd plan to ride heavy, so light weight upgrades won't help much (losing weight will help way more than any upgrade). The best upgrade you can do is probably puncture resistant tires. $100 will get you a great set that will save you dozens of flats. I love continental gatorskins or continental 4 season tires, but you'll have to do your own research.

You can get great gravel tires that run fine on asphalt in case some light off roading can save you some time.

Finally get lights for night riding. Get a rear red light that has a mode that's on all the time and still flashes brighter. Then people won't lose your position with the strobing, but it'll still grab their attention so you don't get hit by a texting driver. I really like this one, but there are dozens of decent choices.

Cygolite Hotshot 2-Watt USB Rechargeable Taillight with USB Cable https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005DVA57Y/ref=cm_sw_r_other_awd_GQC9wbAKFWJVD

The front light is critical so you can see at night. I love the light and motion lights. The more expensive versions are really bright for off road riding, but they also give you far more than an hour with the same brightness as cheaper versions. I suggest this one, but as always, it's a pretty personal choice.

Light and Motion Urban 650 Headlight (Silver Moon) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KAPC2FG/ref=cm_sw_r_other_awd_IIC9wb7D5E8M1


In order of what I'd purchase first:

Brushes, degreaser and lubricant for the chain if you don't have it.

Rear light for safety.

Front light if you will ever ride at night.

Better tires.

Tools to cover more regular maintenance.

Panniers

u/kaceFile · 2 pointsr/bicycling

> The ideal scenario is to have a big club where you can find a group that goes at the pace you want, but in most places your options will be limited. Perhaps start by practicing your group riding skills with a slow group, then go with a fast group and accept that you might get dropped.
The average guy on a Saturday or Sunday morning doesn't care about the gender makeup of the group but does want to get a good workout. They won't mind if they have to wait for you for a few minutes after designated sprints, but if you can't keep up at a normal cruising pace then it's better to wave goodbye.

Oh, totally! I completely understand that. There are some bike shops that have group rides of various levels, but that's about it. Not too many clubs (other than casual ones) around here that I've been able to scope out. But, maybe I'll check out the casual ones to learn some etiquette-- that sounds like a good idea!

>Consider getting started on clipless soon, since clipping in and out quickly is a key group riding skill. Other than that, all you really need is the equipment to repair a puncture (bring a spare tube, not just glue and patches) and the right clothes, including gloves and glasses.

Rodger that! I'll probably get clipless in a month or so. Do you have an opinion on THESE? I want to have the option of using my bike to commute-- so I don't want to commit solely to clipless.

>Sounds like you're on the right track. See if you can bump up to 3 days per week training as this will really help. And if you're only doing short workouts make them count. Towards the end of winter you should be doing some tough interval sessions.
When you have an opportunity to race in the spring, just dive in. Crits are great fun if you can keep your cool when people are riding very close to you. Don't worry about poor results at the beginning.
Women's racing often has small fields or mixed fields, so a lot of races break up. Just keep hammering away.
And if you get a chance, have a go at individual time trialling. It's either the most boring form of racing or the truest, depending on your philosophy on life.

Yeah! I think they have open studio time, so I'm hoping to get in a 3rd training session during the week by myself (I just don't have the cash at the moment to pay for the 3x/week program ;( And biking outside isn't an option here in the winter-- though if the weather holds up like how its been: We might skip winter entirely!)

Re: Racing-- Oh I plan to! The first one is in April, so I'm planning on doing one per weekend (if possible), before the BIG tour comes in June. Provided I finish all of the races I participate in, I think I'd be able to compete in those as a Cat 4!

u/Rehd · 8 pointsr/bicycling

Enjoy the FX! I'm rocking the 7.5 and I am completely in love with cycling. Here's a few words of advice:

Ditch that cable lock. I can walk up to a bike with a cable with a five dollar tool and have it for myself in 10-20 seconds. Get a U-Lock and rope. The correct answer for how many locks or what kind of locks to use is how many you are willing to carry. This will depend on your location as well. U-Locks + ropes typically require an individual to have a hacksaw, grinder, etc. I live in a smaller college town and mostly just have to worry about drunk assholes so that works perfect. In other areas more heavy duty and smaller U-Locks are more necessary. This will probably work fine and is cheap unless you're in Detroit or something.

Fenders. I feel like that should be your next investment unless you bike a lot at night. I bike a ton at night and decided to invest in great lights after almost being hit by both cars and bikes several times. The first time you have somewhere to be and go through a puddle, the fenders pay for themselves. These are what I rock and I go through puddles / lakes which I probably shouldn't. I stay nice and dry while my friends breeze through them and get completely soaked.

Racks and bungies are great for the FX series. Like others mentioned, this is just a fun bike. I use it for recreation, commuting, bar hopping, exercise, you name it! A rack and a bungie net makes it awesome and Ortlieb panniers are an even better addition.

Besides fenders however... the seat and pedals (maybe) are the next things I'd recommend to look at. The pedals look metal in that picture, but if there's plastic, toss them. Well, I guess you can use them. It depends on the rider, but there's a pretty good track record of the FX series stock pedals only lasting roughly 500 miles before they completely break. Obviously this will vary by user. These are my favorite commuter pedals because I can go clipless later or I can commute at the same time without switching out. These are cheaper and better for commuting just because of the pricing.

As for the seat, your ass will never get more comfy than sitting on a brooks.

Enjoy the FX, it's a wonderful machine and I cherish mine. I was biking to work for the first time in a month (been on vacation) and I forgot I had to go to work. I accidentally biked a few extra miles down the bike path before I remembered I was commuting and not going for an enjoyable bike ride. Careful, it becomes an addiction.

And here's a shameless plug for my pride and joy. It still had the old pedals, saddle, fenders and needs an updated snapshot.

u/E39Echo · 3 pointsr/bicycling

Definitely get a bib, not shorts. I hate the elastic in shorts, and bibs also don't shift around on you. I am a big fan of Voler and they also have some of their items on sale on their website right now.

You didn't specify which kind of pump you have. If you don't have a floor pump; get one. You will always want to top off your tires before you go out. There is a lot of debate on pumps, but I love my Joe Blow Sport.

Don't get a camelbak. I am in love with my camelbak for hiking, skiing, hunting, etc. but hate it for road cycling. It is uncomfortable in the road cycling position. I'm no expert, but it also seems to generate a lot more drag, which will slow you down. Get bottles instead.

I'm a huge fan of 24 oz Polar Bottle. They are cheap and keep your drinks pretty cold.

I would also recommend a quality energy drink if you are going on long rides (4+ hrs). I love Cytomax Tropical Fruit. Buy super cheap bottles if you are using energy powder, because they are hard to clean and get kinda gross after a while. Before I started using a good energy drink, I would tend to bonk out after 4-ish hours. Switching to an energy drink helped me keep going on longer rides.

If you bought all of these things, you would be just shy of $200. Things I'd consider but don't think are absolutely necessary are: gloves and a good jersey. Also a bike computer, but a lot of people are just using Strava on their phones. You can also buy another bib in case you want to ride multiple days in a row.

Hope this helps!

Edit: Definitely have a portable pump and/or CO2 inflator with you on your rides.

u/zedmartinez · 4 pointsr/bicycling

If you aren't in a city with notoriously high and advanced bike theft, and aren't leaving it out overnight, try this: http://www.amazon.com/OnGuard-Pitbull-Ls-11-5-4-5/dp/B005YPKBRI/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1463020335&sr=8-3&keywords=onguard+pitbull

The long shackle is technically less secure, because it's easier to leverage open, but in a place without a lot of racks it's a blessing to have, because you can fairly easily find /something/ in short walking distance that'll go around, unlike the smaller Ulocks that mostly only work with racks (or, I've found, bikes without big bags and wide upright handlebars). It's a good medium security lock, and both sides of the shackle lock. Downsides, it's heavy, because big, but not as heavy as a chain which is your next smart option (don't get cable locks, they can be cut soooo easily), and the mounting bracket is OK, but I've had two of them fail. I just carry mine in a bag now.

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1463020570&sr=8-1&keywords=kryptonite+series+2 This is a little lower security lock, but still a mighty fine one in an area with mostly thefts of opportunity. The included cable is for passing through your wheels for a secondary bit of safety. It's the best selling option at the good local bike shop out where I am (Indianapolis).

As for using them, this is the classic guide: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html His method is routinely the best, but without racks it can be hard to lock through the wheel and not the frame. If you can't lock through the wheel, make sure the shackle goes through one of the triangles. And, no matter what, lock to something securely attached to the ground and don't lock to anything the bike can be lifted off and over. Be sure and try lifting any cheap racks you do come across, you'll be surprised how many aren't bolted down right... or at all.

u/giantnakedrei · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I can't answer most of your questions, but I can give advice for one or two things. As far as the bike shorts go, don't feel that it's necessary to wear them for every ride. And wearing shorts over them is definitely an option. I wear a pair of more 'form-fitting' but not overly long shorts over my bike shorts (me in bike shorts is more than anybody but my gf ever wants to see.) But, you might want to buy a jersey shirt, if only for the pockets on the back. If you want to carry anything on longer rides, the bouncing of stuff in shorts/pants pockets gets old REALLY fast.

And as far as the pedals and shoes go, I'd advise waiting on the clipless ones. They're nice as far as riding goes, but I'd get used to everything else on the bike first. They'll probably run more than $25 bucks if you decide to upgrade to them (although there are less expensive ones out there - they usually start around $40-50 for the cheaper ones.) Shoes will cost a good bit too. But they aren't an absolute necessity - in fact, you can pedal a SPD pedal with normal shoes in a pinch, it's just a bit less stable.

And as far as apps go, you'll probably be up a river looking for that functionality (especially the crash reporting.) However, the most popular (and the 4 that I use regularly - aka every ride) are Strava Ride with GPS Map My Ride and Endomondo. Ride with GPS has live logging (every minute) for you SO to track you if you wish. All of them do map tracking for free. Advanced statistics are available to subscribers and/or Pro/Plus (paid) versions of the apps on the Play Store. They'll work with bluetooth HR sensors as well. Find out which one works best for what you want before you shell out cash for these subscriptions...

As for the mount, I have a waterproof one that was about $30 here in Japan, but probably isn't available in the States. NVM FOUND IT. It works adequately, but my phone is prone to overheating in the sun (not a top quality phone) as the bag seals and there is no ventilation. Although it does lock the phone securely to the bike. Between that and a constantly checking speed and stuff I switched to carrying my phone in my jersey pocket when it's especially warm outside.

u/defacedlawngnome · 3 pointsr/bicycling

For tail lights I highly recommend the Planet Bike SuperFlash, PDW Radbot 1000 and PDW Danger Zone. Here's a direct link to Portland Design Works' selection of lights. I can't speak for PDW headlights as I have yet to purchase one but the quality of their tail lights is outstanding. All three of these lights cost $25-$30. I purchased them on Amazon.

As for a headlight I use a Fenix LD20 which will set you back $60 but the light is way better than any dedicated bicycle light with the same output (180 lumens @ 2xAA) for that price (e.g. Light & Motion/Magic Shine/NiteRider/etc). The LD20 can be used as an EDC with an assortment of attachments which can also be used on your bike. I've been experimenting with the white diffuser tip and have found that it provides a great 360 degree illumination of my bike at night when mounted on the down tube.

You can mount the light just about anywhere on your bike with either this mount or this one. The first I use on the handlebars and second I use to mount the light on my helmet. They're also good for mounting a lock on the frame.
I also invested in a pack of Sanyo Eneloop rechargeable Ni-MH batteries on amazon.

Whatever lights you decide on settling with I strongly recommend they take AA or AAA batteries as CR123's and 18650's are expensive and hard to come by when on the road.

You can never have too many lights. I've invested over $140 in several lights to be better seen and that's much cheaper than having to pay a hospital bill because I wasn't illuminated enough.

Lastly, I recommend the Delta Airzound Air Horn. This thing is a beast and impresses everyone that sees it and scares many that hear it. It has saved me from two very near collisions at night when my lights just weren't enough because the drivers weren't paying attention at all.

u/annodomini · 2 pointsr/bicycling

The easiest would be to just go to a local bike shop, ask them what needs to be done, and have them do it.

It sounds like you are interested in getting your hands dirty and doing the work yourself. In that case, the usual advice would be to get to your nearest bike coop, take one of their bike maintenance classes or rent space in their shop and have someone help you out figuring out what you need to do and how to do it. But it looks like your closest bike coop might be in Sacramento, which is a bit of a hike. There is apparently a guy in Chico who is in the process of starting a bike coop, so you might want to try contacting him.

Beyond that, you can try striking out on your own. A few good resources for learning about bike maintenance are Sheldon Brown's website (ignore the crappy 90's style design, he has tons of good information on his site) and the Park Tool website (they have lots of good repair info, and they will sell you all of the tools you might need). If paper is more your thing, then good beginning books would include Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance, Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance, or the Park Tool book. And I know you've already been redirected to /r/bicycling from AskReddit, but for bike repair questions, /r/bikewrench might be more helpful (check out the sidebar here on /r/bicycling for links to FAQs and other relevant subreddits).

As far as not riding like a douchebag, if you ask 10 cyclists you'll probably get 11 different answers (and if you ask non-cyclists, you will probably get a lot of dangerous advice). There will be endless debates as to whether it's OK to run red lights, whether you should pass on the right or split lanes, whether bike lanes are a good thing or not, whether you should wear a helmet, etc. Some of the more universal tips: ride with lights at night. Don't ride on the sidewalk. Don't be a bike salmon (riding the wrong way in traffic). Be predictable. I find that BicycleSafe.com has some practical tips on safety without getting too much into the endlessly debatable points.

And finally, welcome to cycling! I hope you enjoy it; it can be a lot of fun, get you some exercise without even really trying, and is so much cheaper and less hassle to deal with than driving a car.

u/why-not-zoidberg · 2 pointsr/bicycling

A tool kit (or a good bike multi-tool) is fairly inexpensive, and is incredibly useful for maintaining, repairing, and upgrading bikes. It's not going to directly affect your ride to and from work, buthelp you keep your bike in top condition so that your ride is easy and safe.

Something like this kit, or this one would be a good place to start, and supplement with individual tools as you need them.

A fairly comprehensive multi-tool like this one would also work for infrequent repairs, though they can be somewhat cumbersome to use at times.

Lastly, a good repair book might not be a bad idea. I like Lenard Zinn's Zinn and the Art of (Road/Mountain) Bike Maintenance. However, there are also man great websites and youtube tutorials (park tools has some excellent guides on their site) that will fulfil the same role.

u/aggieotis · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Lots of us commuters use SPD shoes and pedals. You don't have to, but they're pretty nice. The shoes you'll have to check out for yourself as every foot is different, but I would recommend the Shimano M520 as a great and cheap starter pedal.

I'm not a big fan of campus pedals (one side flat, other side clip), but some folks are. If you really want the best of both worlds I think you'll be better off with something like the Shimano M424.

u/6545666444699 · 1 pointr/bicycling

It has much of what you need (allen wrenches & screwdrivers), plus a bunch of things you might not (sockets & socket wrenches). If all you have to spend is $12, you could probably do worse, but if you want a good multi-tool that'll last you a while, you should probably skip it.

At a minimum, i think a multi-tool should have allen wrenches (3,4,5,6mm at least), a philips and a flat screwdriver, and a chain-breaker. It should also have at least one tire lever unless you carry that separately. If your bike has hex head bolts anywhere (usually 8mm, less commonly 9 and 10mm), it should also have those or you should carry them separately.

Some people carry a tool like this one that has pretty much everything. The chain-breaker on that one is outstanding; I used the same one (on a different Topeak tool) as my only chain-breaker for years and it still works perfectly.

My bike doesn't need those extra tools, so for an all-in-one, I prefer only to carry what I need. This one is the first one i bought 7 or 8 years ago and was used regularly until last spring. It has all the tools needed for bikes that only use allen bolts, and the chain-breaker is awesome if you have a separate allen wrench to turn it. The tire levers are pretty solid and will last years if you use them carefully. My only real complaint about it is that the chain-breaker is turned using a 4mm allen head glued into one of the tire levers and doesn't last, so you need to carry a separate 4mm allen wrench or plan to use the tire lever to disassemble the tool so you can use that one.

I carry this one now. I bought it to replace the other one last year after I finally broke one of the tire levers. I really like it; it's more compact than the Hexus II and weighs a bit less, and still has all of the same tools. The weakest part is probably the chain-breaker, but it seems strong enough to handle the occasional roadside emergency.

u/smokescreen1 · 1 pointr/bicycling

I bought an old 12 speed racing Peugeot 3 months ago and I am delighted with it.

Since I live on a steep hill and had not done any kind of exercise in years, I asked a LBS for a solution and they put a mountain freewheel on it. I changed the tires (got bigger tires, good quality) and brake pads, cables and housing myself (some googling and checking my new knowledge at the LBS did the trick).

In other words, I went for the second hand, vintage (but a good make) bike because I was not sure I would stick to biking. With the tires I have, my road bike can handle gravel but certainly not trails with rocks and the likes.

Maybe the friend you borrowed the bike from could help you with a second-hand purchase.

If money is not an issue, put the money into a decent cyclocross bike but go to a reliable shop and discuss your options with them.

Oh... and I bought this book, it has got everything on bike maintenance (it is no rocket science... what is hard is to figure out components compatibility when you want to upgrade an old bike. If you are just maintaining your bike, it is pretty basic).

Unless you live in a very hilly area, basic biking is not that hard: the bike carries your weight. Essentially, you have to keep in mind that you should strive to pedal at a regular cadence and use your gears astutely. Increasing the length of your rides is probably what you are aiming for, if you enjoy the touristy aspect of riding. If you are more into fitness/cardio, well... I don't know (pedal faster, probably).

The only problem I encountered is finding a good saddle (it seems my last purchase might do) and finding raingear that does not make you feel like you are sitting in a hot bath.



u/justaquickaccount1 · 1 pointr/bicycling

If weight is not an issue, you should get the Kryptonite New York Lock. I have it and have never had an issue with it. It's pretty much as secure as you'll get with a bike lock, without resorting to incredibly huge, heavy, unwieldy solutions. I live in Philly too, which has a ton of bike theft.

This looks to be even thicker and more secure, but I can't tell from the picture how large it actually is.

For the most security, the lock should be small, but big enough to put through the frame and back wheel, while still having room to accommodate the front wheel (which you should take off and lock with the back wheel and frame, provided it's a quick-release wheel- if it's not a quick release, then get one of the cables or an extra, tiny u-lock to lock the front wheel to the frame).

Take some time to look up the most secure ways to lock a bike. It doesn't matter how long you've been riding for- if you're unfamiliar with how to securely lock up a bike, having a better lock won't mean much. How you lock it up, where you lock it up, and what you lock it to are all important considerations.

And just know that there's no perfect solution. If somebody comes along with an angle-grinder, your bike is getting stolen no matter how many locks you have on it. Exercise good judgement in how long you keep it locked up in one place (as in, don't just leave it out overnight in a high-theft area if you can avoid it). And even having a great lock won't prevent somebody from taking your seat, handlebars, headlight, reflectors, fender/mud guard, water bottle, or anything else that might be on your bike but not chained down.

u/benben555 · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I have a set of Shimano PD-A530 on my Salsa Vaya that I use daily for commuting (platform) and longer rides on the weekend (SPD).

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376967521&sr=8-1&keywords=shimano+pd-a530

I really like them, they have not failed me after 2000 miles and are a solid feeling pedal. Even though they do not have the more 'spikey' surface on the platform side I have yet to have my feet slide off even in the wet. It may be a smidge out of your price range, but honestly it was for me as well, but I do not regret it one bit!

The big thing to keep in mind with dual pedals is will you be able to easily flip them to the side you need. With the A530s the SPD side is always on top in it's equilibrium position which means I don't have to look down to find the side I want. I just reach for the pedal with my foot and either clip in, or flip the back of it forward to get to the platform side.

Personally I think the design of the pedals you are looking at would make it really hard to determine which side of the pedal you are on. But, just like everything if you get used to it I'm sure it will work great. It all comes down to personal preference I guess!

u/bluesatin · 1 pointr/bicycling

After quite a lot of research, I've taken the plunge on buying a road bike for general use after not riding a bike in like a decade... Decided to splurge on a B'Twin Triban 500SE (shop link that'll probably inevitably break), rather than deal with the hassle of trying to find a second hand bike locally and deal with potential repairs etc. And of course for my own personal vanity of liking minimalist designs, the bike's look is perfect for me, I'm not the biggest fan of the more traditionally bright decals etc.

It'll be the first nice bike I've had as well, I had a massive mountain bike thing when I was a teenager but never used it off-road, considering I'm a slender fellow it weighed a tonne and wasn't much fun to use. It'll be interesting to see what a light road bike will be like. Can't wait for it to arrive! :D

I've been trying to make sure I don't forget any of the essential accessories I'll be needing. So far I've ordered these:

  • Multi-tool
  • Puncture Repair Kit
  • Mini-pump
  • D-Lock with a cable loop
  • Helmet

    Things I need to look at:

  • Lights Bought a NiteRider Solas and Lezyne Super Drive XL for lights.
  • Oil
  • Cover (since there's barely any room in my flat, might have to sort something out if I'm not using the bike often in Winter or something).

    Is there any other essentials I'm missing? I imagine there might be a lot of tiny things that I'm missing, stuff like reflectors.

    Also recommendations for the stuff I'm missing will be appreciated, I just bought some good rated stuff off Amazon, no idea if the reviews are completely wrong, I know they can be for some products I'm more versed in.

    Also any tips for someone's first ride in a while, and especially first time on drop handles? I've done some basic research on how to hold the bars and use the Microshift gear levers, but I'm sure there's little tips that might help.
u/Gnascher · 3 pointsr/bicycling

Get a pair of bar-ends. They even have ones that "convert" a flat bar to drops. But even traditional bar-ends will provide you with some additional variety of hand positions which will help alleviate hand/arm discomfort on longer rides. This is an inexpensive solution that may effectively alleviate your comfort problems.

As for any further upgrades, I would not bother with this bike. Keep it well maintained, and sell it and buy another used bike that may be better suited to the kind of riding you want to get into.

It's never worth it to upgrade a lower-tier bike such as yours (and actually most hybrids). It's barely worth it to upgrade even mid-tier bikes, but not all decisions are economical when you're comfortable on a particular bike or have an emotional attachment to it - upgrades in the "few hundred dollars" category might be worth it, and wheel upgrades are definitely worth it, as you can bring a good wheel to your next bike. Upper tier bikes rarely need upgrades, except maybe a wheelset.

u/MOIST_MAN · 13 pointsr/bicycling

I've created a short list of everything I have, linked items are the ones that I recommend.

Things for the road

Frame/ Mini pump

Saddle Bag

Patch Kit

Tire Boot (You can make your own for cheap, but these are still good)

Tire levers (See Multi-Tool, Levers Included)

Multi Tool (Super-Recommend)

Bike Lights

Spare Tubes (Optional for the road)

Bottles of choice

Sunglasses of choice

Gloves of choice (Important! For preventing impossible-to-heal palm scrapes)

Cycling compter

U Lock (no cable locks! they're garbage) <<I Have 3 of these, but then again, I live in Oakland.

Things for home

Floor pump

Tools (Pretty much covered by Multi-Tool, but there's things you may need like cassette tool, chain whip, etc)

Wet and Dry chain lube

Clothing (Optional, I only have the shoes and windbreaker)

Hi-Vis Jacket

Clipless shoes, I recommend SPD for easier walking

Jersey

Padded Shorts, or Bib shorts

Windbreaker

Leg Warmers

Most importantly, you need knowledge of cycling. Look up videos on youtube about safe riding on the road, traffic laws, hand signals, how to repair your bike on the road and at home, how to take a fall, and as much theory that you can)

EDIT: Do not let me trick you into thinking that a multi-tool is a replacement for the big-boy tools that are available on the market. Some of those tools are actually worth the investment. However, be that as it may, do your research first, because there's some overpriced crap out there ^^^Park ^^^Tools.

u/[deleted] · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I was in your situation, but I felt that I have a cross bike so I can pull off a SPD cleat.

I use them for 40km rides, haven't gotten fit enough to go higher yet, still practicing hydration and eating while riding. They're great. I would consider them adequate training shoes if you're starting out, and want to commute/ride for fun as well. That's basically what I do, I have one bike that does it all.

I got these shoes from the LBS with these pedals from amazon and I'm happy. The shoes are nice and stiff (they don't bend at all under my bodyweight), and the pedals work, haven't had an unclip incident yet - it was my intro to clipless.

The stiffness makes it awkward to walk on, but not nearly as bad as I imagine SPD-SL cleats to be. I can go into stores without looking like a duck, I can even carry my bike and run with it. (CYCLOCROSS FTW)

Now, in a few years when I may be a more serious roadie, will I want something much lighter and road-specific? Probably. These will do for me until then.

u/neoterix · 1 pointr/bicycling

I was in your position once, though I had a folding bike with a flatbar (so essentially a hybrid that folds). As someone mentioned below, getting Ergon grips with barends does at least get you a second hand position, but frankly, it looks like you've explored all the options and none are particularly exceptional. One of the additional costs to consider in conversion (in addition to the drop bar and brifters) is that the hybrid-style v-brakes are incompatible with brifters, and you either have to get road-style caliper brakes (best) or an adapter (look for a "travel agent"), which some say cause some sponginess or lack of feel in braking.

Anyway, I wouldn't say that someone that logs 100+ miles a week (20x3+40) is a "casual" rider, and I discovered that after doing a century ride, I felt the "versatility" of the upright, flatbar hybrid position was too limiting. It's a shame you have such a nice hybrid bike--frankly, I'm disappointed in the bike industry's push to get people onto hybrids, in my jaded view, they are simply a case of "jack of all trades, master of none" and the so-called "versatility" is just another word to sell bikes to people who are initially put off by the idea of lycra-clad roadies. Road bikes come in all kinds of geometries these days, and there are some pretty relaxed geometry bikes (they call them "endurance" these days) which should really be what's sold to the more "casual" rider instead of hybrids.

Anyway again, I sympathize with your apartment lifestyle... I ended up sucking it up and getting a real road bike after deciding that I like biking enough and I wanted to commit to it as a positive lifestyle/fitness change. Thankfully, since the other bike is a folding bike, the space addition wasn't huge. Maybe the solution instead is a really nice two bicycle rack :)

u/ChimpStyles · 1 pointr/bicycling

When you say "Trails", do you mean singletrack loose dirt bike paths, or more along the lines of fire roads, hard packed dirt with a bit of gravel?

If the latter, I think your "city tires" will probably do just fine. Even if they're full slicks (which I suspect they aren't), simply letting some air out of the tires will provide the control you need.

On the tire's sidewall you'll find a max PSI rating. For the road keep it near it's maximum for rolling efficiency. Probably anywhere from 60 to 85 depending on the tire they put on. Lower it to 45-50 for dirt. You'll be surprised at how well the bike handles.

But ChimpStyles, you ask, What if I want to ride 5 miles on the road to the trailhead and back? Won't that suck with the tires deflated? Get yourself a portable pump replies the ever stylish ChimpStyles. You'll want one as part of your toolkit if you get a flat. I like the Topeak Road Morph G. Ask your local bike shop for help if you don't know how to change a flat, I'm sure they'll help.
Thanks ChimpStyles, you're the best! cries monkeyfunky.


And they all lived happily ever after.

If you are going to be riding some more serious / technical / whateveryouwanttocallit trails, then some knobby, dirt-specific tires would be of benefit. In that case, if you can afford a second wheelset I would do that. Tell the shop you what you want 'em for and they'll help you pick out a good set. That will be way cheaper than buying a different bike. You can get a good wheelset with tires for ~300-400 vs. 600-tothemoon for a decent mountain bike.

Have fun on the bike.

u/Jacob_The_Duck · 1 pointr/bicycling

Hey nice bike! If I were you I would add a saddle bag with some tubes, tire levers, and maybe get a small pump, and since you're just commuting the whole "it ain't aero" thing doesn't really fucking matter in my opinion ;) I would recommend this and these and this. Also read up on sites like Sheldon Brown for basics, and also I would recommend the GCN youtube channel for repair and maintenance. Also as far as locks go get a U-lock like this for most security and use this locking method. Have fun and stay safe, and feel free to ask any questions to me or any of the other people on this sub!

u/fuzzo999 · 1 pointr/bicycling

I have this book and it has everything I wanted to know thus far. Plus it is pretty easy to read and understand. Good number of pictures as well if that helps you.
I have found that this channel is a great source also.

There are a few basic tool kits out there that should do the trick for you. Of course, I had to get a few additional tools along the way. I am just starting to learn how to do my own work as well, good luck!

u/Summer95 · 1 pointr/bicycling

The criteria is suitability for use and purpose. You're looking to commute to work, not race for trophies. Reliability, not high performance, is critical. At 14 miles a day, 5 days per week and 50 weeks per year you'll be logging 3,500 miles annually. If you commute both ways it's 7,000 per year. Diamondback and Trek both make bikes that are made for commuting. They're built to be reliable. Bikes that are made for speed will often use lighter weight material for improved speed. Lighter weight often means thinner or more easily damaged. Having a breakdown 9 miles out sucks.

I have a 2009 Diamondback Sport Response. Listed at about $600 at Dick's Sporting Goods. It was on sale for $325. I ride because I enjoy riding. Fortunately, it's also a source of daily exercise. My typical ride is 8 to 16 miles a day. At 14 - 16 mph I'm not racing. I have about 12,000 miles on my bike. As with all bikes, parts wear out and have to be replaced. I replace the rear cassette at about 4,000 miles. It's $25 and I replace it in about 15 minutes. I've replaced the chain once. I've had it in the shop twice. Last tune up was about $75. Money well spent.

As for brakes, I will never own a bike that doesn't have disc brakes. They have a lot of stopping power. You'll be riding where people are driving. You're going to need stopping power. Disc brakes are nearly indestructible, virtually zero maintenance and will stop you even when they're wet. Caliper brakes are a bit more temperamental and require adjustment from time to time. My experience is that they do not have the same stopping power as disc brakes. This is exacerbated when the tire is wet. And a spot of mud really adds to reduced stopping power.

Lights are not expensive. I use a Nite Rider CHerry Bomb on the rear. You can see it from a long way off - and that's kind of what you're going for. Cost $20 to $25. I currently have a Schwinn front light. It really doesn't put out the kind of light I want, but it has a one-click and it goes to flashing mode which gets the drivers attention.

If I were going to race, I wouldn't go with a Diamondback. If I were going to ride cross country (as in across the US over a couple of months) I'd be OK with my Diamondback based on it's known history. Although I wouldn't mind stepping up a notch or two if that came with a higher level or reliability. For a cruise ride to work, I'd go with the Diamondback and put the money I saved into a good helmet.

Again, it comes down to fit for use.

Good luck!

u/eeget9Eo · 1 pointr/bicycling

I realized I need to buy some stuff to maintain my bike, and was looking for some input on what to get for the 'essentials'.

I need a repair stand. I was thinking about this model from Amazon. Seems to have decent reviews. I have a step-through bike so I guess I just hold it by the seat post and that's fine?

I also wanted to adjust my saddle position and the seat post length, do I need a torque wrench for this? I found this one. Should I just get a fixed torque one? Or just use normal hex keys and save my money?

For cleaning the chain and drive train, is it worth getting one of those special chain cleaning tools and cycle specific degreaser or can I just use "LA's Totally Awesome" cleaner and degreaser from Dollar Tree and a couple of floor scrub brushes held together? The Dollar Tree product I have already because I use it diluted as a general cleaner. At full strength it can soften certain plastics and remove some paints so it's pretty strong.

Is there any other stuff that I'm missing that I need for basic maintenance that I'm missing?

u/boredcircuits · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Everyone has a favorite chain lube. I use Finish Line. Honestly, it doesn't make too much difference which lube you use, as long as it's one specially formulated for chains. Some are designed for wet conditions, which is good for some people.

For cleaning, pick up some automotive degreaser. Bike-specific degreaser is expensive and isn't really much better.

To clean the chain, you can usually just use a rag and some degreaser. A chain cleaning tool (the ones with three internal brushes) is handy, but not required. Always lube after cleaning, which should be done every 100-200 miles.

If you really want a clean drivetrain, I highly recommend an ultrasonic cleaner. Very effective at cleaning the cassette and chain, with almost no effort. Just remember to relube the chain really, really well after cleaning it.

u/Pulptastic · 3 pointsr/bicycling

Pedal: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000WYAENC/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1395772017&sr=8-1&pi=SY200_QL40

There are other options, but those are the most common, they're cheap, and use the same cleats as the bikes at spin class. You can always upgrade later if you find a reason not to like these; pedals usually come with cleats and most or all MTB cleats use the same 2 bolt mount so they will work with your MTB shoes.

Shoes: go to LBS and try some on. All MTB shoes should be good for walking, but different brands fit differently. Or order online from somewhere with free returns in case they don't fit; the Shimano M-088 are a good start, I love the ratchet buckle.

u/WWJBTPC · 2 pointsr/bicycling

People downvote me because I'm a little weird, but some of these are good, they have the capacity of being clipless, but still having the option of using regular shoes if you feel like it. If you want to save the weight and use only clipless these are good, they're simple clipless pedals, both are rather inexpensive, and if you feel like spending more money

u/drnc · 4 pointsr/bicycling

When I first started riding I was in the same position. I was good friends with a guy who'd been riding his whole life. (1) I asked him to teach me. (2) There was a bike shop that did free workshops and I would go to those. (3) Lastly I watched a lot of YouTube videos. (4) I'd also get a book like Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance. It will be trial and error at first, but eventually the basics become second nature and the more advanced repairs can be done with reference material, patience, and luck. Good luck.

u/Orikx · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I do all my riding at night but mostly paved trails. I did a ton of research before buying my lights.

Front:

MagicShine 872 - This is what I use. For Price per lumens you can't beat this thing. It's crazy bright. I have it on 50% most of the time sometimes lower. For distance it's about the same at 50% or 100%. 100% is just much brighter immediately in front of you.


I would actually recommend the MagicShine 808 though. It's a little cheaper and all my research showed the side by side comparisons the 808 actually throws light out a little father. It's just not as bright in the first 25 feet. Since I leave my 872 on 50% it wouldn't matter and I would get a little more distance.

http://www.amazon.com/MagicShine-MJ-808U-Bicycle-Improved-1100-Lumen/dp/B009GSLUR4/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1409954087&sr=8-3&keywords=magicshine+872

Both have an external battery pack and don't use a USB charger though. Which for some people is a problem. I don't mind strapping the battery to my top tube.

Edit to add: Neither of these has a flashing or pulse feature. They do have an adjustable brightness level though. 872 has last for roughly 2 hours for me at 100%. The power buttons illuminate to give you a rough estimate of battery level. After a 2 hour ride with it on 50% the entire time it will show that it has more then 50% left. They say it will last 3 hours at 100% but reviews I read said it last 2 1/2 at 100% then dropped its self down the 75% then 50 > so on until it completely died at 6 hours. I've not actually done that myself though.

Rear:

I use Light & Motion Vis 180 - This thing is ridiculously bright and I love it. Full 180 degrees of visibility from the amber lights. It's very expensive though for a taillight.

http://www.amazon.com/Light-Motion-Tail-Silver-Moon/dp/B00LH1W9AU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=undefined&sr=8-1&keywords=light+and+motion+180

My research pointed to Cygolite Hotshot 2W USB being the best bang for your buck. I would have bought this but my LBS didn't carry it and I needed something that night for riding so i got the Light and Motion.

http://www.amazon.com/Cygolite-Hotshot-2-Watt-Rechargeable-Taillight/dp/B005DVA57Y/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1409954733&sr=8-1&keywords=Cygolite+Hotshot+2W+USB


Hope this helps.

u/pokemeng · 4 pointsr/bicycling

your price is just about right for shoes + pedals. Most new bikes dont come with a pedal so unless you know otherwise about the bike you are getting you will probably need to purchase a pedal and if you are purchasing pedals you might as well purchase shoes :] right? if you give a cyclist a bike, hell want pedals, if you give him pedals, hell want shoes... :P Also im a big fan of just splurging on what you can and enjoying the full package. This is all dependent though on your budget.

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO

this is the pedal i ride on my commuter. its a good dual duty pedal and the platform feels solid. Its a bit bulky so i dont ride it on my nice bike but if your planning on clipping in only sometimes i would suggest this one. If you are planning on riding clipped a majority then i would suggest a pedal without the platform.

Here are the differences in clips. (i think they are called the cleat but i am going to continue calling them the clips)

road clip

road clip shoes notice these have 3 holes where you screw the clip into the shoe in a triangular pattern.

spd clip

spd clip on shoe

notice the spd clip is smaller and recessed. This makes the shoe feel more like a normal shoe and you dont notice the clip as much

road v spd, road on left

road v spd clips and pedals

As a late disclaimer, I have never used road clips but this is the information i gathered in the process of purchasing. Road clipped shoes also usually have a stiffer sole, i believe.

As far as your question goes. I cant imagine long rides anymore without being clipped into the bike. You feel and are more attached to your machine. Your pedaling will most likely be more fluid, you can pull the pedals on the upstroke, your feet wont pop off the pedals on hard shifts letting you pedal through the shifts (something i couldnt do so well without clipless), and you have to learn to trust your bike because your stuck in it :]

That said, I did ride without clipless shoes for quite a while and didnt have any problems but if you asked me to go back now i wouldnt do it. I think if you cant swing a set of shoes and pedals right now, you wouldnt die because of it, but i would suggest investing in them if you are looking to be more serious about riding.

I hope this helps your decision and doesnt make things even more confusing :P

heres my setup for reference.

shoes $100

pedals $70

if your not sure how to use them. You slide the front of the clip in and then start pedaling and push the back of the clip in and it will click in. To get out you twist your ankle away from the bike and the clip will pop out. After i get my pedals i always loosen the spring on the pedal to the loosest setting, then tighten to preference. Looser settings will allow you to still twist your foot side to side while clipped in. Also i think spd clips will give you more side to side play than a road clip.

EDIT: i changes the road clip picture, it was a bit confusing before

u/_CorkTree_ · 2 pointsr/bicycling

The conversion isn't worth it, but it's a good deal for the bike anyway, so I would just get it and ride it as is to get used to shifting while you save up for a proper road bike. If you're really set on mounting drops, I'd go with something like these. They're drops that fit like standard MTB bar-ends. I would consider getting more narrow flat bars in conjunction with them, but it's not a big deal.

u/150DudeandStillYoung · 3 pointsr/bicycling

Naiveté.

Moved from a suburb (where I could have left the bike unlocked in the back of a truck for 2 hours without a worry in the world) to a city for work. Brought the Giant Escape 2 my Dad had given to me, but only had a cheap cable lock and hadn't been given access to my work's bike cage yet.

3rd day of training, my start group and I were headed to happy hour. I walked outside and the bike was gone from the rack outside the office.

I was able to look at the security footage; some dude literally walked up, cut the lock discreetly, and walked away like it was his.

Filed a police report, and went to happy hour. Then I bought the Escape 3 and a Kryptonite U-lock and didn't bring the bike to work until I had bike cage access.

u/zair33ka · 1 pointr/bicycling

I am wrong and you are right, but the market is still dominated primarily by two types: SPD and SPD-SL. OP, I still recommend you do your own google research and LBS research because everyone has different preferences on pedals and cleats. I ride SPD on my road bikes, yet these are considered mountain bike pedals. Talk to someone at your LBS. As far as cost (and the reason I ride SPD), these are some of the most affordable/cost effective pedals on the market. If you are new to clipping in, you can get nice mountain bike style shoes that will allow you to walk around comfortably also. Also, I apologize, I didn't intend to sound condescending, but I do think a google search will give you more info faster than reddit.

u/colinmhayes · 1 pointr/bicycling

Zinn & The Art of Road Bike Maintenance for a book. Sheldon Brown for articles. Against the chainring or crank arm? If chainring, then it sounds like you just need to lube your chain.

In general, it's good to wipe your chain down after a ride using a rag and just pedaling the bike backwards with your hand. When the chain is no longer quiet, it needs lube. Different lubes last different lengths of time, so I can't really give a schedule for this. Riding in the rain is a good way to make the lube go bye-bye. Eventually the chain will need to be cleaned. Some people clean it on the bike with something like the Park Tools contraption, and some take it off. I take it off, clean it, and lube it before I put it back on (unique to the lube I use)

u/mochabear1231 · 1 pointr/bicycling

Yeah, any other non-road bike pedal will be more than enough. I have these on my Felt, and they're not true road or mountain bike pedals, more like commuter-esque/urban riding pedals. A lot of people like the Shimano SPD pedals because they are really great value for the price point. These ones are the most common and are very versatile.

Unless you're pro-cyclist level, there really isn't a huge gain (at least imo, ymmv) between the two. Comes down to preference really. I have noticed in a few bike shops that road shoes/cleats tend to run a little bit more as well, but I also wasn't really looking into those, so obviously there's going to be variation.

Yup, I wear those to bike and 4-5/7 days of the week at work. Really not complaints at all - very sturdy shoe, good design, and the vibram soles work great in any wet/non-ideal conditions.

It sucks to say, but you are definitely going to eat shit at least once while getting used to clipless pedals. Just a part of the initiation into biking culture!

u/ryan924 · 1 pointr/bicycling

I'm going to assume Philadelphia is a lot like NYC ( where I live) when it comes to bike theft, so I will give you the same advice I give people that move here. Get a Kryptonite u lock. This one is the absolute cheapest that you can go with, but you'd be mush safer going with this. Lock thought the front wheel and frame. I would suggest getting at least a cable lock for the back wheel. Anything quick release will be stolen unless locked down. Best to replace anything that is quick release. No locking method is 100%. Whatever lock you have, there is a tool that can break it. The only thing you can do is not make it worth the effort. So don't go locking up a super nice bike. Lock it whenever you're out of arms length. If someone jumps on it and goes, you'll never catch it.

u/DaveOnABike · 3 pointsr/bicycling

The Zinn books are a great hard copy reference, as well. I keep the Road and MTB editions in my garage near the tools. Great resources with excellent diagrams and descriptions.

u/jbcorny · 3 pointsr/bicycling

good questions. this mini u-lock combined with a cable [to secure front wheel, too] is what is now used by most who are serious about securing their ride.

and these two rack designs are typically preferred in the u.s.:

new york city rack - nyc is making this their "city approved" rack after a thorough design contest. bikes can lean against it to be stable; can lock the front, rear, and frame easily; and it looks very clean from a design standpoint

typical "u" tube: these are found a lot and function very similar to the nyc rack. aesthetically they're not as nice but a lot cheaper and good function. you can see how the yellow bike can secure both wheels and the frame.

btw - what country?

u/commanderchurro · 2 pointsr/bicycling
u/Yarzospatflute · 3 pointsr/bicycling

This is the best advice here. As for a pump, if you're going to go with a regular pump this one is what seemed to come up the most when I searched this sub and it's served me pretty well. It does kinda rattle a bit when riding, though. Down the line you'll probably want to get a regular floor pump, too, something like this maybe.

I'd also agree that gloves aren't necessary. Also agree with two cages and two water bottles. I started with just one bottle but quickly realized that I need two. Any old cage will do, and Camelbak Podium bottles are a popular choice. I got the clear one so I can tell at a glance how much water I have left.

u/kelsoATX · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I use this heavy ass lock. A hacksaw can still cut through it, but it takes more time.

I also use a cable to secure my quick-release front wheel.

There's no sure way to secure your bike, all you can do is use good locking stratagy. Lock it to something solid in a well lit place where people are more likely to notice a theif holding a saw or bolt cutters.

u/leoberto · 1 pointr/bicycling

Road bikes are great lighter the easier it is to ride, it might be worth getting slime tyres to stop punctures, I have a triangle bag that goes inside the frame that I put a small pump and a multi tool in + my lunch on a weekday.

I would recommend two thick D locks to use when parking, I thread the 'D' through the bag buckles and keep the keys and lock in the Bag.

for weather gear you need a rain layer warm layer and sweat layer to keep out the cold. waterproof gloves, goggles or eye protection.

Fenders would be a good choice as well to stop mud flicking up.

Don't get a mountain bike, really not very easy to ride and heavy. Also lights

u/farrelly · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I have the Shimano A530 on my city/rain bike and they're great. It's nice to have the ability to ride in regular sneakers as well as being able to clip in. Installing pedals is simple as well. No need to bring it to the shop. All you need is a 15mm wrench and some grease (which you can buy at the LBS).

For the most part I work on my own bike with the help of youtube and this book.. I think as long as you're somewhat mechanically inclined, the hardest part about working on your own bike or car is having the guts to just do it. You're likely not going to screw anything up beyond repair.

u/dubbl_bubbl · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Last year I got my first "real" bike and decided to take the plunge and get some clipless pedals, after about 2k miles I will never look back. A friend in the cycling industry recommended Shimano SPD pedals, they are cheap and easy to exit, (road specific pedals and shoes tend to be more expensive) and also tend to have a recessed cleat. I have Shimano shoes they are comfortable, and relatively inexpensive (as far as bike shoes go) you might be able to find some better deals on nashbar or other sites like that though.

I am about to order some Shimano PD-A520 which is more of a touring pedal, it has a bigger platform which will reduce hotspots on long rides (which wasn't a problem until recently, probably due to shoe wear.) You may also want to check out these which give you the choice to use clipless shoes or just regular shoes.

*sp

u/fap__fap__fap · 1 pointr/bicycling

Bike originally retailed for $1,129.99 source

He does say that the shifters need replaced, which is going to run you about $40-$50 for the parts, if you can install it yourself.

I'm a fan of the pedals on the bike, although they aren't that expensive to pick up, about $40. If he isn't selling cleats with the bike, and you don't have cleats, they are going to cost you about $16. I can't tell what kind of bike computer is on there, but low end bike computers can be had for $10-$20, so they usually don't drive up the bike price.

It is nice that it was overhauled recently, but the items listed sound like the bike has not been used gingerly, however that is the norm for mountain bikes. The bike seems reasonably priced, but if you are looking to talk him down I would quote the "scratches and stuff", shifter replacement, possible lack of cleats, and the fact that the drivetrain is previous generation 9 speed, not 10 speed. From the unwillingness to ship and the overall state of the bike, especially the lack of cleaning prior to picture taking, I would bet that the seller is largely trying to get rid of it, as he quoted, "I am buying a new bike & do not have room for a lot of bikes".

My personal strategy, were I negotiating on this bike, would be to cite the problems with the bike, give a lowball offer at $300, and be happy if you were able to scoop it up for $350, though $400 does not seem unreasonable considering the equipment.

Overall I have found that X-7 and X-9 perform well, and personally do not mind running 9 speed kit in my mountain bikes. I have had a lot of success picking up older bikes on craigslist / ebay, and the huge cost savings far outweighs the fact that your bike isn't as shiny.

u/gnarmonica · 1 pointr/bicycling

I'm a little late on your post, but as someone who only recently got serious about cycling and even more recently went clipless, I'll share some thoughts:

> more speed/acceleration

As others have said, there isn't a substantial speed increase. However, in my opinion, it does become easier to get up to speed if you pop out of the saddle and floor it. It also makes climbing feel far easier to me. The biggest advantage is the added stability in your feet. After 5-10 miles, I don't even feel the pedals so much anymore and it becomes a fluid process.

> But does this tire you out faster?

Not really, but if I'm being honest, "pulling" uses a set of muscles you may not be used to using, so your legs may get unexpectedly sore for the first couple of rides if you do that. Once you're past that (which was quick for me) there are no real downsides.

> Are they hard to get out of in a pinch?

This depends. There are different types of cleats/clips, and you can vary the tension on each, making them easier or harder to get out of. I've been using mine for about 6 months and have always been able to clip out in time, even once when a car cut me off and I had to get out in a split second.

> Are good/light ones terribly expensive?

Prices vary widely, but you can easily get a solid set of pedals for $50 or so. I have these pedals here, since I ride recreationally and also use my bike to commute in to work. Notice there are clips on one side and a flat platform on the other. They aren't the lightest, but they aren't super heavy, and the versatility is great.

u/Aun_vre · 1 pointr/bicycling

I'm gonna bite back on this....It requires a huge amount of component swapping to get a bike with flat bars converted into a bike with drop bars at some pretty egregious costs. You are right in thinking that the [bar end route](
http://www.amazon.com/Origin-Bicycle-Drop-Ends-Black/dp/B0013G6PB8) is the most reasonable. If you really want a bike with drop bars, why not sell the Sirrus and look for a new ride?

Specialized's TriCross are great bikes and I think their lowest priced drop bar equipped model. If price is an issue bikes direct is always a great source and craigslist of course for the best deals.

u/reidburial · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I'd recommend the Shimano A530 pedals, they're pretty great imo and got plenty of good reviews, you got SPD on one side and platform on the other when you don't feel like using your cycling shoes.

u/SPV1 · 3 pointsr/bicycling

Do you want them to see in the dark, or to be seen?

These are the best:
http://www.dinottelighting.com/

They are not cheap.

Here is a much more affordable tail light:
http://www.amazon.com/Cygolite-Hotshot-2-Watt-Rechargeable-Taillight/dp/B005DVA57Y/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1372712157&sr=8-4&keywords=cygolite+bike+lights

In my opinion, any of the super cheap blinky lights (e.g. Knog, ~$10) are a waste of money. They won't make you more noticeable. I don't know how much you care, but there are plenty of youtube videos demonstrating how bright some of these lights are. Without knowing your budget, it's hard to recommend something.

u/PigFarmington · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Buy this book: Zinn & the Art of Mt. Bike Maintenance
Best mechanic guide out there. (Take it from me... I'm an ex-mechanic) There's a road bike one too, however much of it is applicable to all bike drive-trains.

One thing I would never skimp on is a quality saddle. Buy a slightly cheaper chain, shifters, whatever... but never settle on a saddle.

You should be able to get a road bike for £500-600. However, it will be entry level so a year or two into it's life (depending no how much you ride) there will be replacements. You could always get a rigid hybrid for the road too if you want to save some money. Here's an example Trek FX Hybrid line

Lights...One thing to know about lights. Unless you're spending $100 on a front light, they're meant so you're seen, not so you can see the road ahead. If you want to see the road, here's an example of what to get Niterider

One final note on a helmet. They all pass the same safety tests. The price increases due to other factors. Comfort of pads and straps, ventilation, etc.

u/questions_fo_days · 1 pointr/bicycling

Just my experience but I went with Bontrager Solstice shoes and absolutely love them. I have a wider foot and they have rubber on the bottom so not terrible to walk a short distance in.


For pedals I went with Shimano A530 pedals. A solid pedal that can be ridden as a flat as well. Not the lightest pedal but very practical for me.


Total cost $130.00. Might be an option for you.

u/eccentricfather · 2 pointsr/bicycling

A decent repair stand. One with quick release clamp and a solid tool tray. Something like this stand would be awesome. It makes doing bike maintenance SO much easier if you have a good stand. I bought a cheap one and I regret it every time I use it.

u/muchosandwiches · 2 pointsr/bicycling

> http://www.amazon.com/Origin8-Drop-Ends/dp/B0013G6PB8

definitely save up your money and get a nice Tiagra or 105 road bike when you can afford it. Way better than getting a $750 bike that you'll want to upgrade in 2 years.

u/gabbagoo · 1 pointr/bicycling

Oh man, besides the pedals I'm not sure these are upgrades as much as they are 'add-ons' but hey I'm done working so I'll pretend by being on Reddit:

Got this light from my LBS with my bike, love that it was bright as shit and rechargeable...I emailed the company about some the band and different sizes since we have the interrupter lever, they were awesome and sent me some to try out

This tail Light because it was also rechargeable and crazy bright...people behind me have rolled up and asked what kind of light it is...me likey

These panniers because the good reviews, minimal looks, and the waterproof aspect..I use these guys along with a random rack from REI everyday....love it..I also got this backpack thingymajig that makes the pannier a backpack

Got these pedals because they allowed me to rock normal shoes when I'm not wearing these, I like that I can tool around with just normal shoes on without worrying about foot placement.

And riding through town with the oblivious drivers/tourists around downtown I'm picking this horn, we'll see how it goes..and maybe a gopro......

u/hirschmj · 1 pointr/bicycling

Just gonna paste an email I sent a friend with a similar question:

On the bars:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006QQX3C4/
With:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/product/B004WLCLQY/
And:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AAQOV5E/

The wide angle thing is important for bar lights, otherwise it's too much of a spotlight and when you turn your bars you can't see the trail. With that big battery it's good on high for 3 hours.

My old light just broke and I replaced it with this. I've only used it once, but the specs looked good and it worked well. I don't know if it's good for 3 hours though:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/product/B00C2MHNJK/

The battery is claimed to be 6400mah, but it's much smaller than the big 6600 mah battery I linked above. Not sure who's lying on their specs.

All-in, you're at about $70. Not too shabby, 'specially considering it used to be 4 bills for a 2-light setup.

Can always run it on low to keep from blinding folks.

u/HammerTimeHTFU · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I use this to lock the frame and front wheel to whatever I'm locking my bike to and this to secure my back wheel to my frame. I also fun a wire through the second one to secure my saddle.

Locking your bike up is all about deterrence. A determined and knowledgeable thief can get through any lock. The best way to deter a thief is to make sure other bikes are more attractive targets. A good thief could get through both the locks I listed - and any other lock - with an angle grinder, but the trouble of getting through one very heavy duty lock as well as secondary one will make a thief think twice when 90% of the bikes locked up are going to be easier to steal.

As far as other tips: DO NOT LEAVE YOUR BIKE OUTSIDE OVERNIGHT! Bring it up to your apartment or dorm. This isn't always possible but the chances of a bike getting stolen go up tremendously if a bike is left out all night in the dark. When your out and about during the day, try to lock it in a well trafficked area and if possible somewhere where there are other bikes which - as I said - will hopefully be easier targets for theft. Better them than you bro.

u/Weyoun2 · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I just bought this Cygolite Metro 360 head light and this Cygolite Hotshot tail light a few days ago. They are well reviewed and seem blindingly bright when I look at them inside. Several different flash modes and are both USB rechargeable.

As for other products which can save your life, a cell phone and a credit/debit card will be useful if you're stranded somewhere. Wearing a Road ID will be helpful to emergency personnel if you're unable to communicate.

u/rxmxsh · 16 pointsr/bicycling

I went this route from day 1 of my commuter purchase. I love them: http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO

I reduced the tension nearly all the way, and it's super easy to clip in and out. You will fall. Know that right now. You'll forget and you will fall.

The nice thing is having the platform pedal on one side so you can wear street shoes when you so desire.

u/nrhinkle · 1 pointr/bicycling

For rear lights, I recently scientifically determined that the Cygolite Hotshot 2W is the best rear light under $200 you can find (it's $27, and nothing else in that price range compares). You can read my full comparison of 15 different popular rear lights here, as well as the related reddit discussion.

u/mfryan · 3 pointsr/bicycling

i have some hybrid pedals. they are shimano spd and are flat on one side. my daily commute is about 1 mile, so it is really not worth putting the bike shoes on, but when i ride for pleasure i like to go 10-20 miles. then it is worth it.

My pedal setup.

pedals

shoes

u/photo1kjb · 3 pointsr/bicycling

That looks pretty cool. For those who need a two-bike stand, I just installed this guy. It's not free-standing as it needs a wall to lean on, but as long as you're not drunkenly stumbling by it 24/7, it doesn't need to be bolted into anything. It does have a small safety strap for those drunkards out there. :)

u/joeharri84 · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I picked up this book when I started to get into more complicated repairs. When it came to adjusting brakes and derailleurs and what not, it was trial and error and youtube videos.

In regards to getting a new bike, don't be afraid to go to your lbs and share your concerns. They are going to be able to fit you with a bike that is the best fit for you. As said, you are probably going to need a new wheelset so I'd say try to stay away for your max so you have room to get wheels that are designed to support the extra weight.

u/llort_tsoper · 7 pointsr/bicycling

I agree with all of that.

I would just add that bar ends are an economical option for adding more hand placement options to an MTB, without having to swap handlebars/shifters/brake levers.

Most people would opt for a standard bar ends to give you that on-the-hoods/bullhorn hand position. Add a cheap set of foam grips, and install these angled up so that your wrist is straight when riding.

If you want the feel of riding down in the drops, then there are also drop bar ends available. These will require grip tape, and should be installed flat or angled very slightly up.

u/LocalAmazonBot · 1 pointr/bicycling

Here are some links for the product in the above comment for different countries:

Amazon Smile Link: Nite Rider CHerry Bomb


|Country|Link|Charity Links|
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|USA|smile.amazon.com|EFF|
|UK|www.amazon.co.uk|Macmillan|
|Spain|www.amazon.es||
|France|www.amazon.fr||
|Germany|www.amazon.de||
|Canada|www.amazon.ca||
|Italy|www.amazon.it||




To help donate money to charity, please have a look at this thread.

This bot is currently in testing so let me know what you think by voting (or commenting). The thread for feature requests can be found here.

u/Sheol · 5 pointsr/bicycling

I biked through Wichita Falls this summer on a cross country trip! Biking from Wichita Falls to Lawton, OK was one of my favorite days of the entire trip. Might not be the prettiest city, but some of the countryside north of there is great. (Also you guys have the Hotter Than Hell 100!)

For accessories you definitely want to get a hefty U-lock (this is a good one) and learn how to lock it up correctly. If you are going to be biking at night, get a front and rear light. If you are sticking to roads with street lights you need a "be seen" front light, if you are going to be biking in the real dark you'll need a higher powered "seeing" front light.

u/itbai · 1 pointr/bicycling

Funny enough... the pedals I have on there are SPD pedals that came on the bike I previously purchased. They're similar to THESE, which I found on Amazon.

The pedals I will be putting on soon though, are THESE, of which I am a massive fan. They've got SPD clips on one side and a platform on the other side, which means I can clip in when I am using cycling shoes, but can also just hop on with sneaker or any flat soled shoe that I could be wearing. Great for commuting if you don't have room in your bag to switch shoes!

u/Sakriv · 2 pointsr/bicycling

And an Airzound horn when a bell isn't loud enough. I started off with just an Airzound, but it scares the shit out of pedestrians and isn't really appropriate if you only want to announce your presence, so I bought this bell for $9 and save my horn for people with headphones, people blocking the path who don't react to the bell, and cars. The bell is very elegant, and most people seem to recognize two quick bell rings as a bicycle approaching. Yelling is still better than risking an accident by silently zooming by a pedestrian or cyclist who has no idea you're coming, but my rides are more pleasant with the bell.

u/Neandarthal · 1 pointr/bicycling

I went clipless rather recently (yesterday). Go to your LBS, get an accurate shoe size and pick em up online cuz you have more choice and reviews. Good ones come at around 70-100. I bought these guys for 90 bucks and shimano m520's for 30 bucks. Good stuff. Just love them.

u/drosser · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I'm sort of a cheap-ass when something really cheap does the job. With that in mind, for a headlight, I use one of these. In the city, all you need is the lowest setting and get the lens that flattens out the beam, otherwise the beam pattern is perfectly round, which is practically useless on a bike.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006QQX3C4/ref=oh_details_o01_s02_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

For tailights, I use three of something that are almost identical to these, but I pick them up at the local Fred Meyer for $6 a piece. They don't have any mechanism to attach to a bike, the belt clip just happens to fit perfectly on the back of my rack and I use a loop of velcro to attach one to the back of my helmet.

http://www.amazon.com/Personal-Flashing-Safety-Light-Belt/dp/B001JPS5BQ/ref=pd_bxgy_lg_text_y

Always carry a spare tube, patches, a hand-pump, and a multitool.

u/run_throw_bike_climb · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I bought this one on Amazon and I'm pretty happy with it. I've definitely used better stands than this one, but you can't beat the price. I use it at home for quick jobs like you mentioned and also for cleaning my bikes.

u/kimbo305 · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I've found this book to be a great reference:

http://www.amazon.com/Zinn-Art-Road-Bike-Maintenance/dp/1934030988

In my casual experience working with bikes, once you go beyond stuff that's on your multitool, it's all pretty specialized and a tad costly.

Depending on what bike you're building, you might have more in tools than the bike. If you were talking about fabrication because you wanted to make your own tubing or braze your own frame -- sounds like a great long term hobby, but I don't know that I would ride your first self-taught creation.

u/norapeformethankyou · 1 pointr/bicycling

So, if I buy them from here what would I do about shoes? Would any biking shoe work and I just pop in the cleats, or do I have to get a certain type?

Thanks for the tip, seems like they have a good rating everywhere.

u/Quadralingual · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I just bought biking shoes (Shimano with SDP compatibility). I was hoping for some advice on which pedals to get. I'm looking at lower/cheaper end pedals (such as this one, another one, or another, or finally this one).

I have a road bike, and am looking for double sided pedals that I can use with both my clip in shoes and my regular shoes. Do you have any advice?

Thanks in advance :)

u/DonOblivious · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Have you looked at the direct-from-china MagicShine clones? There are quite a few variants out there ranging from "500" to "2300" lumen for not a whole helluva lot of money.

I hear the amazon linked one works pretty well zip-tied to a helmet. Buying 2 (maybe one from a different seller) and mounting one with the wide angle lens on the bars would be a cost effective way to light up everything in front of you.

u/treetree888 · 2 pointsr/bicycling

You've gotten links to Sheldon Brown's website. His site is an incredible resource.

Past that, I like Zinn and the Art. He has some great illustrations that really see you through some situations.

Also useful is Park tools webpage. It is basically the BBB (Big Blue Book) in electronic form.
Don't be afraid to spend on tools - they are invaluable. Just use your mechanical intuition, and think things through before doing them.

u/Dc5e · 3 pointsr/bicycling

What kind of pumps did you have trouble with? Stem mounted ones I presume?

If you're still interested in a pump, I'd recommend you get one with a hose. I have a Topeak Road Morph G and it works great. It functions like a floor pump so you can use your body weight when pumping.

u/jon-one · 1 pointr/bicycling

Yep, Sheldon is my go to for answers. I also have Zinn's guide which can be pretty useful as well.

u/Nickerdos · 2 pointsr/bicycling

http://www.amazon.com/Cygolite-Hotshot-2-Watt-Rechargeable-Taillight/dp/B005DVA57Y

This is hands down the best rear light out there. There are three or four modes of flashing types and you're able to increase or decrease the tempo of each.

The light is so bright that the red light is visible on the ground behind you.

It's also rechargeable.

They have a mini version too, and it's just as powerful.

u/Laptop-Gamer · 5 pointsr/bicycling

These are awesome. Extra batteries can be purchased on amazon as well as larger ones. They are equipped with a quick detach so it won't get stolen while off the bike. CycleGaz uses one.

u/CyclingFlux · 5 pointsr/bicycling

I recently was asking myself this same question, and consensus seemed to be the Air Zound is the loudest horn.

Delta Airzound Bike Horn , colors may vary https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000ACAMJC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_l5xYxbDSGJVRP

But I don't like the idea of needing an air reservoir for my horn. I have been using this for a while:

Hornit dB140 Cycle Horn with Remote Trigger https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006TDEV20/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_l7xYxb01YQYW2

It's very loud but ruined by the sound it makes: it's a chirping noise and people look up in the trees on shared paths instead of looking back or moving over. I ordered and just yesterday received this:

ORP SmartHorn and Bike Light - BLUE https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00L3NK1O8/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_K8xYxbH94B542

A light/horn combo, with two different sounds. It's loud, and if you get it off the Orp website they include the remote trigger for free. Haven't had a chance to try it out yet but my initial impression is very good.

u/gabedamien · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Recommend checking out the vintage section at bikeforums. Some tricks:

An oxalic acid bath for a day or so works well for removing rust from steel (but don't use it on aluminum). Flitz polish, which I used for a lot, requires a lot of "elbow grease" but gets a good shine on things – including paint (make sure the decals are below the clearcoat!), but it does strip the satin anodizing off of aluminum. WD-40 removes a lot of dried-on crud that mere soap and water fail to solvate. If a brake bolt is rusted into the frame, drip WD-40 onto it, use a block of wood as a buffer and smash it with a hammer. If the quill stem is stuck/rusted, unscrew the stem bolt a few mm, use a buffer and smash it with a hammer. - this will loosen the expander wedge. Turning the seatpost (keep the saddle attached) in one constant direction while pulling up is the best way to gradually remove it if it's stuck - twisting it back and forth will gouge it in a particularly ugly fashion. Um... get an adjustable (aka "crescent") wrench, I don't think a single nut on this bike worked with my normal wrenches.

That's all I can think of at the moment. Basic bike stuff also applies, like greasing the threads of every bolt and (almost) every metal-metal contact point (the cranks are supposed to be a dry press fit, though!), and lubing all the pivots & springs & whatnot. I like synthetic SuperLube with PTFE for grease, and a dry chain lube with Teflon for lubricant.

u/jwink3101 · 1 pointr/bicycling

I wondered about this too when I had the same bike, but you have to realize that you will be using it a radically different purpose than the frame was intended. That isn't just fluff. The geometry is very different. As much as I liked to think so, the 7.2 is not really a flat-bar road bike. the geometry is much more upright.

Sure, you can use your corvette to haul a trailer, but that is really not what it was designed for. If you see what I mean.

Now, I personally think it would look like ass, but you can install something like these bar ends

u/texastoasty · 1 pointr/bicycling

ive asked this question before, basicly best answer was bar end drops. like these: https://smile.amazon.com/Origin8-33617-Drop-Ends/dp/B0013G6PB8?sa-no-redirect=1

as far as fit, if your legs are long enough that you can pedal a size larger fine then you may be able to get away with just changing the stem, which isn't too expensive or difficult.

a shorter steeper stem will get the bars closer to you and higher which will focus less of your weight on your hands.

u/flalak · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I got this from my lbs for about 50 and I would recommend something similar. A u lock to go through the frame, front wheel and bike rack and a cable to go through the rear wheel. Maybe something like this from amazon. The keys are nice too cause I can just keep one on my keyring.

u/fixedelineation · 4 pointsr/bicycling

1200 lumen cree lights from amazon are around 20 bucks. A bit of hackery to mount them better than the kit it comes with but they are bright and rechargeable and so far mine has been really solid for the last 2 months

http://www.amazon.com/Lumen-Bicycle-HeadLight-Flashlight-Headlamp/dp/B006QQX3C4

u/archeocyathan · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Does that light work with the Cateye rack mount?

If not, I use a Cygolite Hotshot with the Cygolite rack mount which works really well. The Cygolite is great bang for your buck.

u/Da_Funk · 3 pointsr/bicycling

Nah, it was quite the opposite. I previously used some of the spray on lube, Tri-Flow, too much of it, and it attracted a bunch of grit that required a good degreasing to get rid of. I found it difficult to put the appropriate amount of lube on the chain with the aerosol spray can. After this eventful ride I used Brake Parts Cleaner to degrease the chain and components and the soapy water and a host to get the excess out. Once it was clean and dry I used Finish Line bike lube as directed and it's much better now.

u/CasualRider · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I use this for my Galaxy S3 with an otterbox case on it. I'm not sure if the S4 is the same size, but I assume it is.

It works well. It is secure, generally weatherproof (but you don't want to submerge it) and I'm able to adequately use the touchscreen while the case is on. The only drawback is that there is bad glare in bright sunlight, so you've got to wait for a shady patch to see the screen on a bright day.

u/littlep2000 · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I bought this set as good decent lights, not the brightest, but enough to see in city/town conditions in the dead of night, probably okay if you are very rural;

http://www.amazon.com/Metro-360-Hotshot-2W-Light/dp/B00E1NQ696

As for helmets, more cost generally means lighter/more ventilation, depending on how much either of these means to you.

On locks, I'd suggest a set like this;

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_4?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1396539131&sr=1-4&keywords=kryptonite+lock+combo

it will allow you to lock the frame/rear wheel with the U, and the front wheel with the cable. It terms of safeguarding your bike, it's more like defensive driving; how, where, time of day, amount of people around, prevalence of bike theft, are bigger factors than the size of the lock.

u/TossingCabars · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance and youtube were my best friends when I built up my road bike from a frameset and components (new and used).

u/MountainManGuy · 5 pointsr/bicycling

Gotcha. True, I can see that price with the unit being marketed towards pro teams' mechanics.

This is the stand I use, and it's been great. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=oh_aui_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/OldDickLemon · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I live in a neighborhood in central San Antonio too! I recently got this guy after my cheap academy set was not cutting it. It is amazing actually, slightly bulky as the battery is a second unit but its still easy to mount and I doubt you could find anything nearly as bright for the price.

u/nematoadjr · 5 pointsr/bicycling

Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance

I use this one all the time, great and easy to understand.

u/savageveggie · 1 pointr/bicycling

I was born into it pretty much. Before I was born my dad raced motorcross, but gave it up and started racing mountain bikes shortly before I was born. For a few years he owned a bike shop when I was in elementary school.

For as long as I can remember, the third bedroom in my parents house has been the bike room, with about 6 or 7 bikes in there(and that's after I moved out, although a few of mine are still there)

I just got this stand and am going to build a stand for my bedroom to hold bikes this (can't drill holes in my wall) for the rest of my bikes that are at home. Well, I will never be able to fit the tandem in here.

u/skelengtonsex · 2 pointsr/bicycling

This is what I bought for my apt. I would thing the difference in prices is from aesthetics and overall size of the rack. This gravity stand takes up less floor space and is less industrial looking then the one in your picture. Which could account for the higher price tag. I have one carbon bike on there now and it could easily hold another.

I'm sure that most all of them will work regardless of price. With multiple carbon bikes on a free standing rack I would look at the reviews to see if others have done the same.

u/kscannon · 4 pointsr/bicycling

I have used 2 stands. One is a cheap $50 amazon stand the other is a Park Tool stand I found on craigslist. The Cheap stand work, it is taller but less stable. I prefer grabbing the seat post than grabbing the top tube so the cheap stand will rotate to balance the bike. I cannot get the chain horizontal to run though a chain cleaner. It will always settle to an angle. If it doesnt bother you than a cheap stand works. bike hand has a stand that was $90 now $100 that the head is teethed to prevent rotation. I was going to get that one before I found the Park Tool Stand on Craigslist.

Any stand will be usable but some might be less stable than others or give you a headache. There is a point you pay for what you get before it turns into you pay for the name.

u/sigismond0 · 7 pointsr/bicycling

http://www.amazon.com/Origin-Bicycle-Drop-Ends-Black/dp/B0013G6PB8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1370531491&sr=8-1&keywords=drop+bar+ends

I used these while I was trying to put drops on flats. I eventually just ended up putting actual drop bars on, but these work rather well and are very comfortable.

u/pmfender · 1 pointr/bicycling

http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-60102538-Hexus-II-Multi-tool/dp/B0037N32VG/ref=sr_1_5?s=cycling&ie=UTF8&qid=1422413167&sr=1-5
Definitely the best one I have used. It's got a built in chain tool, spoke wrenches, and tire levers that pop out of the handle. It even has a allen key in the tire lever to tighten the bolts on each end that hold the whole multi tool together.

u/dairypope · 1 pointr/bicycling

So, I have that same pump but I've never used it on any tire that already had air, it's always been as part of a flat repair on the road. It might actually be normal, my floor pump doesn't register anything until I give it enough air pressure to get the presta valve to open.

I might suggest that you get a floor pump for your regular tire maintenance. Your arms will thank you. I've been very happy with my Topeak Joe Blow 2.

u/sparklekitteh · 2 pointsr/bicycling

If you want to learn bike repair and you're flying solo, check out this book-- you can probably find an older edition for about five bucks on Half or at your friendly local used bookstore. It has tons of diagrams and explanations and I've found it extremely helpful for understanding how everything works!

u/EyeMeantGhandi · 1 pointr/bicycling

Zinn's book has helped me immensely.

Also got a Park Tools toolset with some of the basic tools listed in the first part of Zinn's book, it's worked great so far. My bike is spotless and I clean it every 3 or so rides, takes 10 minutes.

u/ChristophColombo · 1 pointr/bicycling

I have this rack. It leans against the wall, and while it's technically intended to hang the bike by the top tube, I just tested and it works perfectly fine hanging the bike vertically.

u/pucklermuskau · 0 pointsr/bicycling

2 locks is all well and good, but very often overkill. Use non-quick release wheels and seat (just carry a wrench), then use small, tough u-lock like this one

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Evolution-FlexFrame-3-25-Inch-5-5-Inch/dp/B005YPK9C0/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1406144900&sr=8-4&keywords=kryptonite+u+lock

lock it through the back wheel, you dont need to actually lock the frame, as long as the back wheel is secured through the rear triangle of the frame. Cutting a wheel rim is impractical.

u/donkeyrocket · 2 pointsr/bicycling

If you want to try it out without mounting anything try this. Takes some tinkering to get the arms and hooks to work well but I've been happy with it.

u/tylerknight · 1 pointr/bicycling

You could just go with a gravity bike stand, and use the wall space without having to actually install anything.

I agree with bigred, though, anything that makes a bike visible above the fence line is definitely a security issue.

u/thewolfwalker · 1 pointr/bicycling

You can possibly get them from Amazon for much cheaper than retail. I got my pedals + clips for around $32 (Shimano SPDs). You can get non name brands for cheaper. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000WYAENC?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00

My shoes were from the Amazon warehouse, and I paid $40 for them. Someone had bought them, tried them on and they didn't fit well, and did the free return thing. They were in their original box with tags and everything. Pearl Izumi X-Alp Seeks, retailed at my REI for $110ish. Shop around!

u/highlandmoo · 1 pointr/bicycling

It's actually not that hard. Aside from cassette/bottom bracket tools you will mainly just need a decent set of Allen (hex) keys and some spanners. A decent pair of cable cutters is probably worth it too if you're going to play around with cables/cable housing.

Sheldon Brown or "Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintence" will get you a very long way. Take the plunge :)

u/geeyoupee · 1 pointr/bicycling

I have one of these and I like it but its sorta bulky. The tire levers on there are pretty handy.

I was wondering if your chain snaps, you could probably just use the tool to link the chain together and ride home with one less link for now?

u/bloudermilk · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I've got the Topeak Road Morph G which I'd give a 8/10 after using it as my exclusive pump for almost a year. The build quality seemed okay at first but it's showing signs of age quickly and after being mounted to my frame is collecting all sorts of sand and dust internally that is affecting its performance – I should probably clean it. On the plus side, it's large and easy to use even to get high PSI and it has a built-in PSI. On the downside, it's large and somewhat hard to mount on my frame.

u/st3venb · 1 pointr/bicycling

Anyone have any good recommendations on pumps with built in pressure guages? I'm currently looking at the following: http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Road-Morph-Bike-Gauge/dp/B000FI6YOS/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS?ie=UTF8&coliid=I2WU21EIVSXT6V&colid=17NALENO65NI8

Would love any input.

u/smashinMIDGETS · 1 pointr/bicycling

I bought a Topeak on sale at my LBS for around $25 bucks 2 years ago, and have never had a problem. It's got great reviews and seems fairly solid.

u/xxenclavexx · 1 pointr/bicycling

I use this not the best mount, but works great on my road bike with runkeeper.

u/darkstar999 · 3 pointsr/bicycling

My coworker has an air horn on his recumbent trike. It hooks up to a bottle and is refilled with a bike pump. It is loud. Something like this.

example video made me laugh :D

u/LanMarkx · 10 pointsr/bicycling

I consider a bell pretty much 'standard equipment' on my bikes now due to this. For whatever reason the bell seems to be get better results overall verses yelling out.

Perhaps part of it is just instinctual, the bell sound is very specific to bikes so the individual really doesn't have to think about what was just said.

Just don't be the guy using an Air Zound on the multi-use trail...

u/KEN_JAMES_bitch · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Does she have a U lock? The nice and thick U locks can be somewhat expensive so I think it'd be a good gift.

Also a nice multitool is crucial for serious cyclists to fix stuff on the go and to just have an all in one tool for working on the bike at home.

u/wiggee · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I have the Topeak Joe Blow for home and Topeak MasterBlaster on my bike. I'd recommend the Morph wholeheartedly - it's got more power than my MasterBlaster, due to its larger footprint and footstand. Should get you through most anything, but a good big pump at home is invaluable.

u/bpwnz · 5 pointsr/bicycling

Niterider Lumina 750 (or higher) is a great light

Bikes direct has a steal of a deal going right now on the 1100 boost: http://www.bikesdirect.com/incredible_holiday/lumina-1100-boost-lights.htm

Don't go less than 700 lumens, don't settle for a janky flashlight rig.

edit here's a good taillight too: https://www.amazon.com/Cygolite-Hotshot-2-Watt-Rechargeable-Taillight/dp/B005DVA57Y (these things are bright)

u/joshuad80 · 1 pointr/bicycling

Thats probably SPD. this is the pedal I have, and I'm pleased with them. You can get better, but these are very well reviewed and cheap.

u/underscore · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I've got one of these in my apartment. The arms are a bit fiddly, but I like it well enough.

u/ridetehbike · 3 pointsr/bicycling

Magicshine. I dont know how to insert links. I ride full on dh at night with one of these strapped to my head. Helmet mount can be found on amazon too. Best light for the money imho.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B006QQX3C4/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1368823682&sr=8-1&pi=SL75

u/misternicholas · 1 pointr/bicycling

What is the wrench for? I have never seen a bike that needs that size wrench although I haven't seen ALL the bikes there is to see.



If you are interested in consolidating a couple of those tools & adding a chain tool, I would highly recommend this guy:
http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-60102538-Hexus-II-Multi-tool/dp/B0037N32VG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1347509147&sr=8-1&keywords=topeak+multi+tool

u/ProdigalSonReturned · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Surely this is a better option, given that it doesn't require batteries.

u/RoyGilbertBiv · 2 pointsr/bicycling

This method is probably the best all-round:
http://www.802bikeguy.com/2011/07/the-modified-sheldon-brown-bike-locking-strategy/

I don't live in a particularly high crime area so I don't carry my cable usually, just a long shackle U-lock since I also don't live in an area with particularly great bike racks.

u/ChariotOfFire · 3 pointsr/bicycling

This is the best option. If you really want to send the drivers a message, you could get an Airzound

u/UnfitDemosthenes · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I had to replace a rear derailleur one time and Lennard Zinn Art of Road Bike Maintenance was a major help. If you like a quick witty read check out the Bike Snob

u/Kazyole · 3 pointsr/bicycling

How big of a lock would you need?

I'm a fan of the Kryptonite New York series personally. They're super heavy duty...I can't imagine cutting through one...There's a 4x8 and a 4x10.25

I use the 4x8 to lock my frame and back wheel, and one of these bad boys to lock my front wheel to the frame.

It's overkill...I know...but I'm in New York.

Amazon is actually very reasonably priced on all of those by the way...if you're looking to order online.

u/soulsizzle · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I've got a Delta Michelangelo in my living room. It freed up a nice chunk of space.

u/Singletrack_Criminal · 1 pointr/bicycling

There are plenty of cheap, cheaper, and ridiculously cheap Chinese-made LED lights and batteries. I've had a lot of luck with MagicShine, but other brands are somehow brighter, bigger batteries, and 1/3 the price (https://www.amazon.com/RioRand-Bicycle-HeadLight-Flashlight-Headlamp/dp/B006QQX3C4/ref=pd_lpo_468_lp_t_4?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=PA7RB7C8JMAVBPKP7FYZ). Not sure how great the batteries/charger are, but for $22, just make sure it won't burn down the house if it catches fire while charging and you're good.

u/hal1300-1 · 6 pointsr/bicycling

Not sure if this would scare them or make them worse, but you could try an airhorn or the airzound - http://amzn.com/B000ACAMJC . Its pretty loud and it may work with the other dogs of the road. ;)

u/mysnna · 1 pointr/bicycling

Can anyone recommend a good bike repair book? I was deciding between these two:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1934030988/

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/097655304X/

u/vhalros · 3 pointsr/bicycling

http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Michelangelo-Two-Bike-Gravity-Stand/dp/B000ACAM38/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1413161565&sr=8-3&keywords=home+bicycle+stand <-- Something like this? I'm not endorsing that specific product as I've never tried it, but something along those lines sounds like what you are looking for.

u/MeatPiston · 7 pointsr/bicycling

These are an effective jogger alert system, even for ones that are using headphones.

http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Airzound-Bike-Horn-colors/dp/B000ACAMJC

u/cricketwisperer · 1 pointr/bicycling

I would suggest you take a look at the light below. It basically offers the same lighting (or better) for a fraction of the price. I've ordered two now (lost one battery) and love using it.

http://www.amazon.com/Lumen-Bicycle-HeadLight-Flashlight-Headlamp/dp/B006QQX3C4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1377034776&sr=8-1&keywords=magicshine

u/day1patch · 1 pointr/bicycling

A very good lock (the one I use daily) is the Kryptonite Mini. It is a bit short, you won't lock your bicycle around lamp posts with this, only a bit thinner. However that gives the lock more strength and makes it a bit harder for thieves to wedge tools inside.

If you want a larger lock Kryptonite makes A variety of others, I would recommend This one, a friend of mine rides with that, but it is a bit on the heavy side.

u/fernguts · 5 pointsr/bicycling

I use Zinn & The Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance. It's great too, and focuses on, ummm... mountain bikes.

u/P-Tricky · 1 pointr/bicycling

I have Shimano A530s on my commuter. Great until it rains.

u/calloused · 1 pointr/bicycling

Bikemake Slim Case

Inexpensive, fits great and you don't have to buy a new case/mount when you get a new phone.

u/i_am_viet · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I used the following with my Samsung Galaxy 3 when I first started out cycling

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B006N0T674/ref=mp_s_a_1_5?qid=1411935126&sr=8-5&pi=AC_SX110_SY165_QL70

It works great and doesn't break the bank.

However, after a couple of months I retired the mount + phone set up. Strava eats through batteries quick. I invested $90 on a Garmin Edge 200. Less profile and way longer battery life.

u/YungSatoshi · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I got this light for $17. People always tell me its one of the brightest lights they have seen. You can also get a wide angle lense for it. I've had it for about 6 months. So far so good.

u/mrvile · 55 pointsr/bicycling

Yup, see: Kryptonite Fahgettaboudit lock, the thing costs $100 and the opening is like 6" x 3.5".

But if you live in NYC, no matter what kind of lock you use, if you leave a nice bike locked up outside overnight, there's a 50% chance it won't be there the next day.

u/Kashino · 3 pointsr/bicycling

the thumb shifter won't work on drops. flat bar clamp section is 22.2mm, drop bar clamp section is 23.8

You can make it work with the sora STI shifter you listed, the cheaper alternative is the microshift stuff you can buy on ebay (I'd go with second hand shimano stuff though)

Then you'd need new cables

Of course the easier option is to just get bar ends, you can even get drop bar bar ends

u/MuddieMaeSuggins · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Check the height of your ceilings - we ended up not getting one of those because the only model tall enough was freaky expensive. Instead we got a the two-bike gravity stand. Ours was only $50, but we found the last one at Target on sale - they must have been getting rid of them.

For the ceiling mounted models, I would be less worried about the deposit and more worried about what your ceiling is made of. If you live in an older building, ceiling mounts can be a great way to pull your entire ceiling down. You definitely won't get your deposit back if that happens.

u/bkrassn · 1 pointr/bicycling

I like these shorts they are not that expensive and have lasted well over a year and going strong. My floor pump looks something like this but I can't remember the brand name. As far as tools you likely just need a screw driver and an allen key for the adjustments. There are some youtube videos that explain the process. You will want a work stand. <-- is the one I got. It is a little bouncy but it works and it was under $100 so I'm happy with it. You may want to throw in a pedal wrench while your at it.

u/imjusthereforab · 3 pointsr/bicycling

It's worth noting here that all kryptonite locks are not made equal. this $75 mini is going to be far more secure.

u/coffeecache · 1 pointr/bicycling

As a college student at an extremely bicycle friendly university, this is the U-lock that I use.