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Reddit reviews: The best sports & outdoor recreation

We found 40,250 Reddit comments discussing the best sports & outdoor recreation. We ran sentiment analysis on each of these comments to determine how redditors feel about different products. We found 19,124 products and ranked them based on the amount of positive reactions they received. Here are the top 20.

Top Reddit comments about Outdoor Recreation:

u/cwcoleman · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

It's Monday and I'm bored at work... so... here are links to all OP's items. It's a great list and this may give other CaH'ers more insight into what OP is carrying. Plus my random comments...

u/defygravty · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

OK, here is a brain dump of whatever comes into my mind. Just hoping to spark your memory so don't get mad if I say a bunch of stuff you already know...

Put all the pieces into a lighterpack.com account and checkout r/Ultralight before you buy (head over there and burn down the sidebar reading list and the incomplete-wiki, it's worth it).

Is that Osprey really 70 L? That's huge. Probably weighs a ton, what are you bringing that fills up 70 L on a 3-5 day summer trip? A 50 L beer keg? Maybe you have some sweet luxury items that take up a lot of space in the pack, but I'd drop the volume on the pack to at least 50 L. If you can manage it, Try a Ultimate Direction Fastpack 30. But if you just can't get your volume that small, get what works. Weight is an issue too, in frameless packs the straps are uncomfortable over 30 lbs, sometimes less. But if you make some smart choices right now, you shouldn't bust 30 lbs. (It's also smart to get the rest of the gear first to get an idea of how much volume you'll need in your pack and if you'll need a frame.)

Research quilt vs sleeping bag. Quilts are big these days unless you are a crazy sleeper. Enlightened Equipment is the shiz. I've bought 4 quilts and made 3 DIY and EE are the best I've tried. EE also sells a synthetic quilt called the prodigy which I use in the summers or as a layer in the winters. I hear that Katabatic quilts are truly the best if the price tag doesn't scare you away. And a super cheap, but quality option though on aliexpress, it's buy at your own risk. Worked for me last time, doesn't mean it will next time.

Massdrop is selling a skinny UL static V (and the insulated verion) right now for cheap. (I own the insulated option and bought it from massdrop.) But there's a lighter not-as-skinny pad called a Thermorest Neoair Xlite. Also the sea to shining sea ultralight pad gets high marks. So look at those, see what other pads are popping on r/ultralight, the balance the weight and costs to your preference. (Assuming you know about r-values and what your needs will be in Maine/Vermont. I'm guessing spring is a little cold so maybe r=~4 in the early spring or high altitude?)

Nemo tents are great. If you're only camping spring/summer I'd get a much lighter weight tarp tent. Like 3 lbs or less including stakes/cords (and footprint if your tent has a bathtub floor).

11-14 oz MSR Whisperlite is awesome. Stoves are pretty personal, it's best to go with one you trust. MSR is probably the right choice for you. I use a tiny 2oz stove and a homemade windscreen. My stove is finicky and too small if you're cooking for 2 or more. However, there's a whole mess of stoves between the 2oz and 14 oz which might still cover you and save you a few ounces or half a pound. Like the Kovea Spider which I also have, and use in the cold (gas liquefies and fuel can must be inverted, so I need a freestanding stove with a tube). I'm personally biased against the jetboil because of how much space it takes in my pack, but I own 2. They are fast, good for groups. Again the MSR is NOT a bad choice.

You also need a cook pot. Titanium is a waste of money, find a cheap Aluminum one for the same results. Like the olicamp ones, or if you want a real lid, you'll have to spend more (the metal lids cost way more for some odd reason).

Water filtration. Everybody ravs over the Sawyer Squeeze and I guess I'm out of the loop having never tried it. Fretting about making sure my filter doesn't freeze seems like a source of anxiety. I'll try it eventually though. I like the hand pump water filters. I rock an MSR hyperflow. And if I'm in a big group, I'll break out my Katadyn 6L Gravity Filter.

Get a down jacket from costco or sams for 20$, if you're camping in it, you'll wear it out so no use spending a ton there. (Down packs small and won't take up nearly any pack space)

Get a headlamp, I prefer blackdiamond or Fenix. For BD this image sums it up very nicely. For fenix there's a variety but I am currently using the HL55 (900 lumens). Again look at the weights, but also look at the battery requirements and the longevity/efficiency. Find what you like.

Ok my brain is dumped. Hopefully I hit on something worth your time. If I were you, I'd go as cheap as possible, then put the savings into funding your travel for hiking or buying a kayak. Random, I know, but having blown tons of money on gear I feel like there's quality for a good price if you look for it. And using the extra money to break into a new hobby opens the door to a potentially mind altering experience. Especially a related hobby like kayaking, fishing, snowshoeing, rock climbing, diving (though this one is lots of money), or whatever's clever.

u/GIS-Rockstar · 6 pointsr/duluth

Duluth is an absolute mecca for outdoor winter sports. Gear up properly and you'll love your life in the 8 months of the Northland's winter!

If you're getting outside a lot in Eau Claire, you'll do fine in Duluth. If you plan on spending significantly more time outdoors in Duluth, then that's another story. Depending on where you live in town, you'll have different levels of need for snow tires; either way I'd strongly recommend them. PM me - I'm selling a set of snow tires in great condition over on the Online Rummage Sale for Duluth/Superior facebook group.

  • Thermal regulation is the name of the game. Not enough protection and you're cold. Once you're cold, you're done. Too many layers and you start to sweat. If you can't wick the sweat away or stop overheating, you're done

  • Cotton kills. You need 100% wool/poly/synthetic layers. Cotton absorbs moisture from your sweat, then freezes or just becomes a frigid sopping sponge against your skin

  • Layer selection is important. Something like a North Face Thermoball is great as a mid-layer under a parka for those insanely cold days. I have a SmartWool Marino wool base layer that was expensive but it was essential for keeping me warm and dry. Otherwise, synthetic long sleeve Under Armor kinds of shirts are perfect base layers.

  • Jeans are great at breaking wind and worked pretty well for me as a mid-layer. I usually just used synthetic long-johns to take care of wicking water from my skin. Roll both legs of the jeans up your shin to make room for boots and to keep the bottoms away from the snow or they will just get sopping wet. It's added warmth for your shins too. I'd finish off with a pair of snow pants that can go on and off easily

  • I used solid boots that were comfortable and insulated, with 1-2 pairs of various smartwool/puffy wool socks. Don't over-do it with socks. If your boot is too tight, it'll cut circulation to your toes and then you'll be cold. That's a delicate balance between "it's literally too damn cold out" and "I don't have circulation and I feel like it's too damn cold out."

  • A solid parka that goes below your butt is ideal. I got my North Face parka for around $300 and it was an excellent investment

  • Consider a shell that can break the wind. If you're hiking in Lester/Chester/Munger/etc. it won't be too windy; and if you're geared up properly those super cold temps are really a cake walk

  • Ice chains were important for my wife and myself. ICEtrekkers' Diamond Grip were my favorite. They really bite into glare ice where as coiled wire like basic Yak Trax were more slippery

  • I have a stack of the cheapest bandannas I could find in every color and pattern available. They're usually on sale for a buck each. The problem is that they're cotton, so my breath would condense on them quickly and they would freeze solid within 10-15 minutes, but the point is to keep the wind off of your mouth and cheeks. Even when frozen, they worked very well, and at 32° it was easily 30-50° warmer than the ambient air temps! I usually had 2-3 on me at all times for face protection and to wipe my nose/forehead (in case I started sweating) and I was very happy with them considering how cheap they were. Wash them once or twice before you use them to soften them up. I'd be interested in seeing other options for face covering.

  • Nothing beats a nice long wool knit scarf. Wrap it straight around your face and lay the tails flat against your chest or back for another insulating layer, or tie it in various ways for style and function around town

  • Sunglasses are a must to keep sleet and ice out of my eyes. Consider a set of very lightly tinted shades for evening/dark walking. There was nothing worse than hiking at night when it was sleeting. I've been told snowboarding goggles were lame, but ya know, Lake Superior is fierce before it freezes over. Ha. I would snowbaord all the time with amber tinted wrap-around shades that were snug to my head, and I'd hike with light Wayfarer-style frames

  • Finally, gloves are a real mystery to me. I'm not down with leather/animal skin, but it may be the only option to cut wind, and insulate the most efficiently. I usually used a thin woven wool base layer to wick sweat, a medium sized glove liner that usually comes with a decent set of gloves, and the thickest, heartiest, most beefy damn glove you can find. Pro tip: Make sure ALL gloves work with smartphones (capacitive touch). Never take a glove off to do something because you will never regain that heat without going inside

  • Just get a case of hand warmers. They're good in your gloves; next to your Achilles tendon in your boots; and against your camera or smartphone to keep those batteries running longer

    FIY: I spent 3 years in Duluth as a Floridian with no experience with real winter. Gear up properly and you'll be outside all winter long! It's expensive, but it's TOTALLY worth the investment. Otherwise you'll be cold and miserable; and that is one hella long-ass winter.
u/Teerlys · 12 pointsr/preppers

I wrote this up earlier today for someone who wanted to start getting prepped on ~$75/Month but also wanted to not have to cook the foods. I did include some long term storage as the first step anyway because it's so cheap and easy, but so far as consumables go, this is a good start for you.

--------------------------------------------

A lot of this is a shelf life and storage space issue. If you have plenty of room for storage, I'd start like this:

  • Month 1: This doesn't meet your doesn't-need-to-be-cooked guideline, but it's a really solid start to bulk up on available calories and requires minimal cash and effort, so it's going in anyway. Ignore it if it's not for you.

    Buy two 50lb bags of white rice from a place like Costco or Sam's Club. Find 3 food safe 5 gallon buckets with lids. Get Mylar Bags and O2 Absorbers. Then hit Youtube for instructions on what to do with them. If the Mylar bags bit will hold you back from doing this, then skip them and just clean the buckets then dump rice in them straight. Seal, date, set aside. That's 160,000 calories in month 1. Given normal pantry supplies that stretches things out quite a ways. Plan on rotating out at 7ish years if put straight into the bucket and 20 years if you use the Mylar. Realistically, with Mylar, white rice may be good for much longer than 20 years (most people say 30, but for the minimal investment I'd rotate earlier to be safe).

  • Month 2:

    Grab a Water Bob (not right now though, hurricane season has prices high and stocks low for them). Also, a Sawyer Water Filter or two. That gives you an opportunity to grab an extra hundred gallons of water in your bathtub initially given enough warning, and some water purification options later on.

  • Month 3:

    Assuming you have storage capacity, start looking at #10 cans of food. Those are the cans that are around a foot tall and very wide. Look for things that you would eat and would be usuable in your daily lives, but also ones that would be calorie dense. For example, refried beans, nacho cheese, baked beans, white potatoes, chick peas, chili with beans, etc. Those are things you can use in recipes at home, but can pick them up and store them for a couple of years first. Getting them in the larger can is a better return on investment/dollar than buying smaller ones.

  • Month 4: This is probably more what you were looking for.

    If your pantry isn't topped up with the things your family normally eats, drop that money to get a little deeper on those things. Velveeta cheese, crackers, cans of soup, noodles, peanut butter/jelly, canned vegetables/fruit, pasta/sauce, salsa, dried/canned beans, seasonings, canned meat, canned chili, etc. Date them and make sure to work through the oldest first. Having the normal foods you eat in bulk will likely end up being what gets you through most things (like the current hurricane season, job loss, winter blizzard, etc). Spending on these things can be used to fill out whatever is left of your budget when it gets partially used up on other things. I'd also maybe consider having some flats of bottled water at home as well. I usually keep 4-7 Costco sized ones on hand for my SO and I.

  • Month 5:

    Start looking at longer term bulk water storage. I like 5 gallon stackable water cubes as they're easier to move and use and you buy them as you have a little extra cash here and there, but if you want to bump the budget up a bit for a month and your wife won't look at you like you're crazy, a 55 gallon barrel is a better price per gallon than the individual cubes. Sometimes there's just no replacing having your own clean water source ready to go. Barring all of that, if your family will use them just grab a bunch of flats of bottled water and rotate them. Stacked high they don't take up a ton of floor space.

  • Month 6 and Beyond:

    At this point you're pretty well set initially for both water and food. Keep the pantry stocked and rotating. Add on for long term stored water as you see fit and maybe invest in something like a Big Berkey if you really want to drop some money into it. At that point I'd probably begin considering longer term food storage. More rice, add in some dry beans (roughly 5 year shelf life in Mylar/Buckets), and if you're feeling really into it you can get unground wheat and that will last 30 years or better in Mylar/Buckets. You'll just need to have a hand crank grinder or two to use it.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I get wanting ready to eat foods, and that's pretty easy to do and a great place to start, but as one last recommendation... grab yourself a Propane Burner and a high pressure hose for it so that you can use regular propane tanks. You may be able to eat cold soup out of the can, but it's a lot more comforting when it's warm, and you can pretty easily have the ability to add more of your foods into your diet (like spaghetti or mac and cheese) when you can still have a burner to work with.
u/BarbarianNerd · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

If you want to get by cheap, pare the list down to essentials.
You need water, food, good shoes/boots, and shelter and to keep it light. Everything else is periphery.

The cheapest and lightest way to carry water is to use an empty quart milk jug or two with a rope on it. It's not as good as a camel back style bladder, but it's more reliable in my experience for fractions of pennies on the dollar.

I recommend a Lifestraw or a Sawyer filter for water purification. They cost about 20 bucks and they're really effective. Not necessarily essential for short trips, but it does a lot for peace of mind and you never know when bad stuff will happen. They don't filter out heavy metals or dissolved materials (ie anything <.1 microns).

REI has a really good info primer on sleeping bags

I wouldn't worry about poles for overnight stuff at all. That's for like weeks of constant hiking or alpine stuff. They can be useful and are helpful, but they can be passed by most of the time.

I get by with a rubberized army poncho and a blanket instead of a tent and bag. It's good enough to keep the rain off and a bit of body heat in, but it's not ideal and it's time consuming. I got it at a yard sale for two bucks. But for one night, it's good enough. A rain fly or tent foot print, or plain tarp is also effective. There are some pretty legit one person backpacking tents out there for about 70-100 bucks, I'll probably get one next. Not sure which brands are good though.

For food, I'd do the mountain house meals and hoist my garbage high and away from camp after wards, preferably in an air tight bag of some kind when you haul it out.

Normally I prefer to do something like pilot bread, PB, dried fruit, a big bag of spinach for the first day or two, green beans, nuts, and maybe some quality sausages and cucumbers, but the convenience of the MRE style foods is often appealing. army steel canteen cups are good for boiling stuff in, but the canteens are kinda useless.

A lighter, some matches, and wet fire packets are great.

Get a mid grade belt knife, like a buck or a k-bar or similar. It's a whole nother can of worms to discuss however. Just be careful as some buck knives are made in china, the ones made in idaho are always marked american made on the packaging.

Silva makes a good compass, a good topographic map, a small 10ths scale ruler (or any cheap one) are a good idea. Know your pace count and hwo to use these tools effectively. Compasses are pretty useful in foul weather or unfamiliar places, but navigational things aren't really essential.

I'd get some biodegradable toilet paper and read this.

That's about all I can think of right now, there's probably more to say and think about. Good luck! Park jobs are a ton of fun! Wish I was going with.

u/Gmbtd · 1 pointr/bicycling

Don't worry about the helmet. None are really safer than others, just lighter and stylish.

You don't mention maintenance. You'll want to start cleaning your chain really regularly. Keep it clean and lubricated and it'll last FAR longer for you. You'll probably need a new chain each year too.

You might already know all about bike maintenance, but if not, get a good thick guide like Zinn's guide to bike maintenance, and start reading. Also watch YouTube videos before you try something the first time -- it'll save you tons of pain and money!

The backpack is fine, it'll just make your back really sweaty. Panniers will fix that, not just a rack (that can work though, just get some bungee cords). Panniers and a well designed bag can be great. I have this, and it's very functional, although I hesitate to recommend it as I haven't tried any others for comparison. It clips into a rack by the same manufacturer making it trivial to hold it down.

Topeak Velcro Strap Version Dxp Trunk Bag with Rigid Molded Panels https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004WSLT2O/ref=cm_sw_r_other_awd_yxC9wb6QSPKM2

Pack a multi tool and probably two spare tubes. Patches are great, but they can't fix everything. I'd also suggest having a plan for a taxi or uber ride. You won't need it, but if you have a flat just before an important meeting, it's good to have a plan in advance.

I'd plan to ride heavy, so light weight upgrades won't help much (losing weight will help way more than any upgrade). The best upgrade you can do is probably puncture resistant tires. $100 will get you a great set that will save you dozens of flats. I love continental gatorskins or continental 4 season tires, but you'll have to do your own research.

You can get great gravel tires that run fine on asphalt in case some light off roading can save you some time.

Finally get lights for night riding. Get a rear red light that has a mode that's on all the time and still flashes brighter. Then people won't lose your position with the strobing, but it'll still grab their attention so you don't get hit by a texting driver. I really like this one, but there are dozens of decent choices.

Cygolite Hotshot 2-Watt USB Rechargeable Taillight with USB Cable https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005DVA57Y/ref=cm_sw_r_other_awd_GQC9wbAKFWJVD

The front light is critical so you can see at night. I love the light and motion lights. The more expensive versions are really bright for off road riding, but they also give you far more than an hour with the same brightness as cheaper versions. I suggest this one, but as always, it's a pretty personal choice.

Light and Motion Urban 650 Headlight (Silver Moon) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KAPC2FG/ref=cm_sw_r_other_awd_IIC9wb7D5E8M1


In order of what I'd purchase first:

Brushes, degreaser and lubricant for the chain if you don't have it.

Rear light for safety.

Front light if you will ever ride at night.

Better tires.

Tools to cover more regular maintenance.

Panniers

u/travellingmonk · 1 pointr/CampingGear

Stansport Scout, about as basic a tent as you can find. You can find others on Amazon, but they're all pretty much the same. I used one in the 70's as a Scout and I really wouldn't use one today for a lot of reasons... but the main one was that it was hard to get in and out as a teen without knocking the pole out of place and collapsing the tent (or have others steal your poles in the middle of the night). Can't see it being easy as an adult to get in and out without knocking over the poles.

Klymit Static V. Pretty good pad for the price. Of course you can find cheaper knock-offs, but this one is fairly well rated and comfortable enough and warm enough for three seasons. But if you want something for winter, you'll need something a lot more expensive like the Exped Downmat 9.

A sleeping bag down to -18C, think you need to go with a good bag like the Feathered Friends Widgeon. Not something I'd like to carry with me during the summer, you might want to pick up a nice 30F bag for the other three seasons.

Amazon Basics now carries a very popular cookset. The Etekcity Stove is a good stove for the price; the quality isn't as good as the MSR Pocket Rocket 2, but you get two for $20 which is a really good deal. While you can buy one for $15, might as well spend a few extra bucks and get a spare.

As for the FAK, I try to carry the smallest one possible, one that I've whipped together based on what I usually need. However, if you're looking for a bug-out bag, you may want a nice big kit like the Adventure Medical Sportsman Series which can deal with more serious wounds. Still, you can just look around, there plenty of lists for building your own kit.

The other thing you'll need is a water purifier. The ones backpackers use like the Sawyer Squeeze are considered "filters", they're designed to draw water from clean fresh sources and can fliter out things like Crypto and Giardia but not pollutants like heavy metals or pesticides; for a bug out bag you may want a more expensive purifier that can remove heavy metals and chemicals. Actually don't have a recommendation there... but you could just pick up a Sawyer and make sure you draw from clean sources.

u/launch201 · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

I don't know too much about that backpack, so I can't comment, but you should be able to pickup a pack in that price range if you're just getting started.

water

A lifestraw will work, but essencially you need to go source to mouth, so if you need water for anything but drinking (i.e. for cooking) I don't know if the lifestraw will be best. Sure you can suck in, spit out, but there is a better solution: the sawyer mini is about the same price point: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398890779&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

meals

and that brings me to water for cooking. MREs are heavy, and while you won't be hiking far carrying that weight even for a short distance might not be the most fun (especially if you are saving money on your pack) - there a many commercially available freeze dried meals which are very light and you simply add boiling water to. Mountain house is the most common - http://www.amazon.com/MOUNTAIN-HOUSE-Beef-Stroganoff-4-80oz/dp/B0002YRNJK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398890892&sr=8-1&keywords=mountain+house

besides mountain house there is backpackers pantry (better IMO):
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=backpackers%20pantry&sprefix=backpacke%2Caps

and finally if you want to try some of the best I recommend packit gourmet:
http://www.packitgourmet.com/CookInBagMeals.html

clothes

wool is good because it keeps it's insulation warmth when wet. wool can be expensive though. If the weather is going to be good I'd recommend a couple quick drying shirts (which are pretty affordable)
http://www.amazon.com/Russell-Athletic-Sleeve-Dri-Power-3X-Large/dp/B00719Y8HO/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891200&sr=8-3&keywords=quick+dry+shirt

and be prepared to own the worlds best pair of underwear - buy two pair wear one, wash one in a river:
http://www.amazon.com/ExOfficio-Give-N-Go-Boxer-Brief-Medium/dp/B001M0MN02/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891283&sr=8-1&keywords=exofficio+boxer+briefs

tools

this is probably one of the first things that gets "over packed" what to you anticipate needing a tool for? On the hand saw if you will be collecting fire wood there is a very nice lightweight handsaw that is perfect for backpacking, the Sven Saw:
http://www.amazon.com/SVEN-SAW-Sven-Saw-21/dp/B002J900EQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891413&sr=8-1&keywords=sven+saw

cookware

on cookware it all depends on what you'll be cooking. on a budget I'd recommend this cup:
http://www.amazon.com/GSI-Outdoors-Glacier-Stainless-Bottle/dp/B001LF3IB6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891523&sr=8-1&keywords=GSI+cup

and this stove:
http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Ignition-silvery/dp/B00ENDRORM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891563&sr=8-1&keywords=backpacking+stove

with that you'll be able to boil water for your freeze dried meals, make ramen, and you can also make hot drinks like tea.

u/nestiv · 3 pointsr/Sacramento

I'm just going to drop in and advocate approaching backpacking with the ultralight philosophy. The key principle behind ultralight is to bring only what you need for any given trip and, ideally, nothing more.

Now I'm not saying don't pack things that will add value to your trip, but one of the biggest pitfalls to backpacking is packing in your fears. When people first start, they often bring excessive amounts of clothing, safety gear to outfit an expedition company, more entertainment than one might realistically want or use, or an entire kitchen - sink included. However, most people will discover that if they can lighten the load on their shoulders, they will end up enjoying trips much more. It's best to consider what you need (or even what can be shared in this instance!) - e.g. sharing shelters, cook systems, entertainment, food. Clothing-wise as long as you have an insulating layer (fleece or down jacket) and a rain jacket, and you're more than likely good to go.

So with all that in mind, let's talk about gear more specifically. If you're just getting started, it's best to borrow gear if possible. Sans that option, trying cheap gear is totally reasonable. However as with any hobby, there can be massive differences your random Amazon gear and even the bottom-of-the-barrel hobbyist gear. If you expect you'll want to pursue backpacking more in the future, consider looking into the ultralight and ultracheap gear list recommendations as well as the alternative options.

Since we're looking at coastal trips in California, you can safely estimate lows to be no lower than 40° unless you're truly up in the mountains. Sleeping pad-wise I'd recommend either an inflatable like the Klymit Static V or a CCF pad like the Z-Lite Sol or RidgeRest. I hesitate to recommend an ultralight quilt for a first-timer due to cost, but for reference a 30° HammockGear Econ Burrow weighs 18.62 oz, whereas the one OP linked weighs ~4 lbs.

There's a lot more to be said than what I've mentioned, so I invite y'all to check out /r/ultralight for more discussions on ultralight philosophies and gear. The wiki is a tremendously helpful resource as well. If any of you want a pack shakedown to have someone look over your gear list, feel free to reply or DM me, and I'll try to get back to you when I can. I'll most likely either be out in Texas or climbing Shasta for the weekend this trip will be planned, but have fun out there!

Also paging /r/ulnorcal - /u/Sharp_LR35902 /u/id3550

u/CruiseBiscuits · 13 pointsr/PKA

MVMT watches are well known for being low quality "fashion" watches. These fashion brands are usually aimed at a younger audience so it makes sense they advertise on podcasts. In my eyes they aren't even worth the ~$100 price point. Sure they'll last a while, but so has my 10 year old Timex I got for 20 bucks, or some dollar store one I got as a kid.

 


If you are actually looking for a quality ~$100 watch, look at Seiko, Citizen or Orient. /r/watches is a very good place to learn, and you might find, like countless other beginners, that the Seiko SNK-809 is for you (my first "good" watch was the SNK-807), which is $50-$70 and a real mechanical automatic ("perpetual" for those of you across the pond) movement. Anything from Seiko 5 range is an incredible starter automatic watch.

 

Do some research if an automatic movement vs quartz movement is right for you (quartz is the basic battery operated watch that the "guts" can be found in watches ranging from $500 Movados to dollar store watches). I REALLY like seeing how things work so I really appreciate the mechanics behind an automatic watch. The downside to them is that they aren't as accurate as quartz (a normal range of inaccuracy is like +-10 seconds a day). But you'll never have to change a battery if that is any consolation. If that puts you off, keep in mind that a $10,000 Rolex has an automatic movement good for +- 5 seconds per day. And as a final PSA, stay away from Invicta. Their automatic movements, cheap pricing, and flashy looks may look enticing, but quality control is horrendous. Just as with any potential purchase, do some research on a watch you think looks promising. Give the model name a search on google or /r/watches and try to find a consensus.

 

For those of you who have been thinking they want a watch but haven't started exploring styles (which is the demographic companies like MVMT pander to with their styles) here is the classic "diver" style watch with the Rolex Submariner. A cheaper automatic dive watch I've been wanting for a LONG time is the Seiko SKX007, which obviously pays homage to the Sub, but is about $5800 cheaper. I'd replace the bracelet with something better than what is there though. Maybe I'll get it after college...

Another well loved cheap diver is from Orient, the Mako, though I prefer its big brother, the Ray, even though that is even closer looking to the Submariner.

The absolute best in budget vs quality in a dive watch is the ~$40 Casio MDV-106. You can get a decent 22 mm steel bracelet for almost the price of the watch and it will look fantastic if that is your preference. I've borrowed my brother's a few times and the thing feels like quality and has been put to the test plenty of times to prove itself as a real dive watch. He goes swimming, hiking, plays sports with it, drops it on concrete, etc. Rugged yet elegant looking. Good size too. Highly recommended first diver or first watch!

If you are looking for a real dress watch with "minimalist design" that doesn't look tacky like MVMT's (sorry, just my opinion), there are plenty in the Seiko 5 line like I said, or the lovely Orient Bambino.

 

Came back to say that if you don't really know if you want a watch, don't think you need to spend $100 on your first. Who knows, you might not like how it feels or looks on you or whatever. For the absolute cheapest of cheap, get yourself a Timex or Casio quartz watch. These brands are well renowned for their reliability. This way you'll end up spending only $15-20 on a watch that will last and work forever (obviously with battery changes along the way).


Edit: Some links

Edit: Also, they are purportedly just rebranded cheap Chinese watches. http://www.aliexpress.com/cheap/cheap-mvmt-watches.html

u/Tyler9400 · 60 pointsr/Bushcraft

Steel is steel mate. You can go with the expensive stuff, or with the cheap stuff - We're talking expensive at several hundred and cheap as under 20-50. I've seen 20 dollars knives made just as well as the 600 dollar knives, they just dont have the name brand. It's a chunk of steel, treated so it stands up to specific conditions and holds an edge better. It looks to be full tang - not sure what is up with the holes in the blade, or the design near the MT-5 logo. I found pictures online, looks like the steel comes out a bunch there? No idea what this design is or what purpose it could have - looks sketchy. And the holes in the blade...I mean I've seen the 5 dollar walmart knives with holes so you can create a makeshift spear but..Other then that, no idea why they are on this knife, and they cause more harm then good. You can use it for basic bushcrafting tasks but I'd be careful batoning, I've personally never heard of the brand - it could be name brand and be great, but it has some weird designs.

​

Really, steel is steel - all the fancy features cause more harm than good.

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-4-1-Inch-Military/dp/B004ZAIXSC/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=morakniv&qid=1571462370&s=sporting-goods&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&sr=1-4

That is a 12 dollar knife, and you really won't ever need more, but there are better options. The 12 dollar knife has a thinner blade and isn't suitable to as heavy duty work, but is a great beater knife for doing anything.

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Bushcraft-Survival-Starter-4-3-Inch/dp/B00BFI8TOA/ref=sr_1_7?dchild=1&keywords=morakniv&qid=1571462370&s=sporting-goods&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&sr=1-7

And their top of the line knives are

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Garberg-Carbon-Leather-Sheath/dp/B07B8SP4G9/ref=sr_1_10?dchild=1&keywords=morakniv&qid=1571462370&s=sporting-goods&sr=1-10

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-M-12642-Stainless-Compatible-4-3-inch/dp/B01I1GITMA/ref=sr_1_12?dchild=1&keywords=morakniv&qid=1571462370&s=sporting-goods&sr=1-12

There's a carbon version and stainless steel version. I'm gonna be honest...for the most part, they all do the same thing, but people want different things and fancier things - the garberg is the only full tang out of the bunch, but even their half tang knives are bulletproof, they hold up incredibly well and I've batoned with him countless times without issue. Mora, IMO makes the best knives - I have several other brands, and there are some I like better for ergonomics - but that's not the point, the point is any knife will work, steel is steel. Just find what you think looks and feels good, learn how to sharpen it and what you like, it depends on the what materials/types of trees you are working with, and what type of work you do. I prefer convex and Scandinavian grind (V Grind) knives, the Cudeman MT-5 looks to be a full flat grind - which I mean..AFIAK is mostly used in like chef knives and stuff, it's incredibly sharp but it's not durable, hitting hard objects is gonna cause knicks and it's gonna be brittle. This is all from experience, it's not like im an expert - but to be fair, I'd just keep trying different ones and see how you like it, but I wouldn't go spending crazy money, the $300 knives you see all the fancy bushcrafters use...these are what I call wall knives..They use them in the videos cause they look good but most people would just keep them at home and keep using their beater knives, because we are hard on our equipment and honestly, they work just as wall, all the fancy scalings and what not make them expensive, but they don't make them better.

TL;DR: Steel is steel. Get a cheap knife, in a better grind suited for the work your doing. All depends on what work you do, and what tress you have, soft woods, hard woods ETC.

​

Edit: Definately don't have to go with Mora, I've just always used them and they've done me well.

u/ThePinkPanther2 · 2 pointsr/AskWomen

I don't think it is necessary to give a gift card for a lowkey care package, but if you know they are struggling financially or they have a favorite grocery store or clothing shop then it sounds like a great idea. You can utilize things like Groupon, Amazon home services for cleaning and home repairs, BlueApron or equivalent food prep boxes. I have heard that many people like those type of subscription boxes.

My personal favorite care package goodies are shared below. I would wrap a pretty scarf around a small bundle of goodies. And to make it all pretty, I would pin artificial flowers and a thoughtful card to the front.

HotHands Hand Warmers

[Nature's Approach Aromatherapy Neck Wrap Herbal Pack, Celestial Indigo] (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0027VH7GK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_VuuYBbQY3GTYH)

Handcrafted Goat's Milk and Olive Oil Soap Bar with Attached Natural Organic Sea Sponge - Sweet Strawberry Scent

Tervis Sunflowers Tumbler

Power Thought Cards

But in terms of "adulting" you could give them Groupon vouchers for cooking classes or yoga/meditation. But if they are strapped for cash, I would definitely include a gift card to their local grocery store.

u/CedarWolf · 2 pointsr/Shoestring

Hey, you can also make quite a bit of your own gear if you're feeling up to the challenge. Check out /r/myog for more information about that.

Fancy, fold up cook kits can run you $20 to $70 or more, plus fuel, but you can also make your own cook kits real easily from soda cans, cat food cans, and grease pots. You can get one from Walmart for $7, and an aluminum pot handle from any outdoors store for a couple of bucks. Here's a basic one for $4, but you can find them for $2, too. You can also use a folded bit of aluminum foil as a wind break around your stove.

The best part about those is not only are they light and cheap to replace, but your can stove and your aluminum handle should fit neatly inside your grease pot. Depending on how tall you made your windbreak, you might be able to fit it inside your pot, too. If not, it's just aluminum foil; it'll fold up.

It really depends on what your budget and your conditions are. You can grab a cheap, fairly light tent for $50 or $60. (If you want to go crazy cheap, there are $20 tents that you can set up between two trees or support with trekking poles.)

I wouldn't suggest depending on a cheap tent for the long term, but use them as something you can test out, beat up, and not be too heartbroken over. They're just the basics.

Woot.com often has sales on camping gear, including backpacks, light blankets, sleeping bags, and hammocks. Decent backpacking hammocks usually run about $15 to $25 online, don't stress about getting one that's really expensive and has a lot of features. They're pretty much all parachute hammocks. Worry about investing in the expensive stuff later.

My advice, though? Don't stress about your gear at first. Get some cheap starter gear, read about it, test it, make a plan. Drop on by /r/trailmeals and find some simple recipes that you like. Find a nice state park nearby and look at their maps. Find a camp site and see what's there: Do you have trees available for hammocks? Is there a fire pit already set up? Do you have wood available for fuel? (You probably won't need much more than your cook pot and utensils if your campsite has a firepit with a grill, for example.)

Make your plan and execute it. Let people know where you're going, and what you're up to. Invite a friend if you can. Put your comfy shoes on, toss your crap in a backpack, go out for a weekend, and test your gear. Get some experience with your new stuff, see what works for you and what doesn't. Learn where you want to focus if you want to shed weight, and check your reviews. Go to places like REI: they'll often let you see or set up any tent you're interested in, in advance, so you can check out how easy or how difficult it might be on the trail, in the dark. That last part's important. You can have the fanciest tent in the world, but it doesn't mean a hill of beans if you can't set it up in the dark. (Because at some point, you will be setting up your tent in the dark, in the rain, in some sort of adverse conditions. It happens. Be prepared.)

Practice with your gear, learn your gear. Learn your limits and your preferences.
Knowledge is easy to acquire, useful to have, and doesn't weigh anything, so pack a lot of it.

You're gonna want to get that experience on your cheap stuff, so you can learn and make mistakes without ruining some high-end piece of kit that's really gonna cost you. Get your experience in and add the expensive, fancier stuff as you go. I like to focus on pack, shelter, and shoes. They're going to be your main sources of weight and your big comfort items. Bad shoes and ill-fitting packs hurt. Insufficient shelters suck. Upgrading those early on, or starting with some mid-tier gear if you can afford it, is handy.

And if you decide that maybe this isn't for you, that's okay, too. You can back out without having dropped several thousand dollars on all the latest gear. It's easy to spend hundreds on fancy gear. Try to avoid falling into that trap.

It's probably ultralight heresy, but I often bring a cheap paperback book with me. Sure, it's sort of heavy for a luxury item that I don't need, and if it falls in a creek then my book is destroyed; I get that. However, for me, you can't beat hanging out in a comfy hammock under the trees with a good book. That serenity is why I go hiking and backpacking in the first place.

I also tell myself that if things ever go incredibly sour, a cheap book or a trail journal is also a good source of tinder and toilet paper. Not that I would do such things, but if I was ever stranded somewhere and I had to, the option is there. Similarly, you can signal other hikers or other people in your party if you have a trail journal - just pull out a page and leave a note for them.

Oh, and it's also wise to bring a couple of trash bags along with you. Get the big, kitchen sized ones.

They're great for:

| | | |
|:--:|:--:|:--:|
| holding trash | separating wet clothes | good laundry bags |
| dirty shoe mat | tent hole repair | emergency ponchos |
| emergency pack covers | food bag | extra warmth |

------

Oh, and remember the simple principles:

Pack it in, pack it out. - Any gear (or people) you bring, you're responsible for getting it (or them) back out.

Leave no trace. - You have a responsibility to leave your campsite as you found it, or better than you found it. Any trash you bring, you pack it right back out with you. If someone before you has been an asshole and has left a bunch of trash all over the campsite, try to clean it up, even if you can't pack it all out.

Hike your own hike. - This means that you can have all the excellent advice in the world, but how you do your hike is up to you. No one else can tell you how to live your life, and if you want to carry a little extra weight for a luxury item, or if you prefer a bit of kit that isn't quite in vogue this season, or if you can't afford the high-end, cuben fiber this or that, don't stress about it. You're out there to enjoy yourself, focus on that.

Be prepared. - This is the Boy Scout motto. Things will happen that you're not going to expect. Don't go overboard and don't get too crazy about it, but have a plan and know how to execute it. Learn the area you'll be at and know what sorts of conditions to expect. If you get hurt, know who you can call. If you're in a state or national park, those phone numbers are always on the freebie trail maps they provide - grab one at the ranger station or the trail head and keep it with you or keep a photo of it on your phone. Are you going to need extra batteries? Is your phone going to have service? If you can, sign up for a first aid course or a trail-specific first aid course. That's information you'll want to know if you ever need it.

u/_BALL-DONT-LIE_ · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

Backpacking is what I love above all else, happy to help.

Finding a local Facebook Group or forum is definitely great advice, they're usually the best resources for learning about places to go/conditions to expect/anything specific to your area, plus find some people to tag along with. Starting out with day hikes is also totally the right thing to do, it will help give you a feel for moving through the woods. You could also combine this with car camping to familiarize yourself with your gear and with cooking/sleeping/etc. outside with a little less commitment than a backpacking trip.

I'd recommend /r/Ultralight over BackpackingLight, which is not particularly active and of much poorer quality than it was a few years ago, IMO. /r/Ultralight is quite welcoming/helpful and pretty active these days. I don't always agree with him, but Andrew Skurka is a well known hiker/adventurer who is also a great resource (both his website and his book). I think he is more approachable for beginners than a lot of others.

I disagree with /u/ImAtleastTwelve, at least to a certain degree, on cost. It certainly is not a cheap hobby by any means (especially considering even in great outdoors cities you're still almost certainly going to need to drive decent distances), but having a fairly light setup with solid gear doesn't have to be exorbitantly expensive—at least relative to say, fashion or photography. I could write endlessly about all kinds of gear, but just taking the example of stoves. You can get a little stove that screws onto a gas cansiter and weighs about an ounce for under 20 bucks. Startup costs can be high because there is quite a bit of gear you need, but it doesn't have to be too crazy. Also, it's a popular activity—lots of used gear (I rarely buy anything new) and people to borrow from out there.

And like he said, it's totally possible to do any number of amazing trips with whatever gear you can scrape together. The gear is a means to an end with backpacking, and all you need is enough to survive somewhat comfortably before you're ready to go outside and enjoy yourself. Everything after that is either making it more comfortable or extending your limits.

u/[deleted] · 1 pointr/cycling

Well, you should certainly have a mirror, yeah. Maybe not a disco ball, but at least one. I like THIS ONE the best. Heck, put one on each bar end if you're feeling nutty.

Use flashing lights even during the daytime. You'd be surprised how well they can increase your visibility in broad daylight. For the rear, the Cygolite Hotshot seems to be the brightest from the research I've done. Not sure about the best front one. I got a CREE 1800 lumen on ebay (brand new) for like $40. They sell 'em cheap outta China. Serfas makes a good one too - the thunderbolt I think? Battery doesn't last too long, though. If you wanna be OTT about it, get 2 front & 2 rear - have one steady and one flash in each direction. Then, of course, wear bright clothing & all that. You can find reflective vests for cycling pretty cheap.

My dad used to commute 18 miles each way to work and used a side flag like THIS ONE all the time. It definitely makes folks give you a little extra room. Oh yeah, get a bell. Seriously. They make small ones if you're too embarrassed by a big one, but they don't have the "classic" bell sound. Nothing says "bike" like that ole' "ring-ring" and you want folks to know what you are before they even see you.

With some of this equipment on, my wife calls me the safety patrol leader. She still worries, but she knows I'm adamant about safety, am always on the defensive and, because of this gear and my practices, am less likely to get hit than if I wore all black and thought I owned the road.

Well, other than those pointers, just always be militant about safety, stop at all red lights & stop signs, signal for turns and try to ride in groups.

u/kaceFile · 2 pointsr/bicycling

> The ideal scenario is to have a big club where you can find a group that goes at the pace you want, but in most places your options will be limited. Perhaps start by practicing your group riding skills with a slow group, then go with a fast group and accept that you might get dropped.
The average guy on a Saturday or Sunday morning doesn't care about the gender makeup of the group but does want to get a good workout. They won't mind if they have to wait for you for a few minutes after designated sprints, but if you can't keep up at a normal cruising pace then it's better to wave goodbye.

Oh, totally! I completely understand that. There are some bike shops that have group rides of various levels, but that's about it. Not too many clubs (other than casual ones) around here that I've been able to scope out. But, maybe I'll check out the casual ones to learn some etiquette-- that sounds like a good idea!

>Consider getting started on clipless soon, since clipping in and out quickly is a key group riding skill. Other than that, all you really need is the equipment to repair a puncture (bring a spare tube, not just glue and patches) and the right clothes, including gloves and glasses.

Rodger that! I'll probably get clipless in a month or so. Do you have an opinion on THESE? I want to have the option of using my bike to commute-- so I don't want to commit solely to clipless.

>Sounds like you're on the right track. See if you can bump up to 3 days per week training as this will really help. And if you're only doing short workouts make them count. Towards the end of winter you should be doing some tough interval sessions.
When you have an opportunity to race in the spring, just dive in. Crits are great fun if you can keep your cool when people are riding very close to you. Don't worry about poor results at the beginning.
Women's racing often has small fields or mixed fields, so a lot of races break up. Just keep hammering away.
And if you get a chance, have a go at individual time trialling. It's either the most boring form of racing or the truest, depending on your philosophy on life.

Yeah! I think they have open studio time, so I'm hoping to get in a 3rd training session during the week by myself (I just don't have the cash at the moment to pay for the 3x/week program ;( And biking outside isn't an option here in the winter-- though if the weather holds up like how its been: We might skip winter entirely!)

Re: Racing-- Oh I plan to! The first one is in April, so I'm planning on doing one per weekend (if possible), before the BIG tour comes in June. Provided I finish all of the races I participate in, I think I'd be able to compete in those as a Cat 4!

u/Rehd · 8 pointsr/bicycling

Enjoy the FX! I'm rocking the 7.5 and I am completely in love with cycling. Here's a few words of advice:

Ditch that cable lock. I can walk up to a bike with a cable with a five dollar tool and have it for myself in 10-20 seconds. Get a U-Lock and rope. The correct answer for how many locks or what kind of locks to use is how many you are willing to carry. This will depend on your location as well. U-Locks + ropes typically require an individual to have a hacksaw, grinder, etc. I live in a smaller college town and mostly just have to worry about drunk assholes so that works perfect. In other areas more heavy duty and smaller U-Locks are more necessary. This will probably work fine and is cheap unless you're in Detroit or something.

Fenders. I feel like that should be your next investment unless you bike a lot at night. I bike a ton at night and decided to invest in great lights after almost being hit by both cars and bikes several times. The first time you have somewhere to be and go through a puddle, the fenders pay for themselves. These are what I rock and I go through puddles / lakes which I probably shouldn't. I stay nice and dry while my friends breeze through them and get completely soaked.

Racks and bungies are great for the FX series. Like others mentioned, this is just a fun bike. I use it for recreation, commuting, bar hopping, exercise, you name it! A rack and a bungie net makes it awesome and Ortlieb panniers are an even better addition.

Besides fenders however... the seat and pedals (maybe) are the next things I'd recommend to look at. The pedals look metal in that picture, but if there's plastic, toss them. Well, I guess you can use them. It depends on the rider, but there's a pretty good track record of the FX series stock pedals only lasting roughly 500 miles before they completely break. Obviously this will vary by user. These are my favorite commuter pedals because I can go clipless later or I can commute at the same time without switching out. These are cheaper and better for commuting just because of the pricing.

As for the seat, your ass will never get more comfy than sitting on a brooks.

Enjoy the FX, it's a wonderful machine and I cherish mine. I was biking to work for the first time in a month (been on vacation) and I forgot I had to go to work. I accidentally biked a few extra miles down the bike path before I remembered I was commuting and not going for an enjoyable bike ride. Careful, it becomes an addiction.

And here's a shameless plug for my pride and joy. It still had the old pedals, saddle, fenders and needs an updated snapshot.

u/mschwar99 · 1 pointr/hiking

I don't have any experience with LL Bean gear, but I don't see anything wrong with the those items.

When I started I intentionally bought cheap gear knowing it wasn't going to be as light or as durable as a backpacker would ideally want. I figured I might as well try some basics out before I committed to spending money on high quality gear.

The pack you list looks pretty small - only 2400-ish cubic inches. That could be a tight fit. I started out with this guy. Its an ok but certainly not "good" pack. Its not super durable or super comfortable, but it was inexpensive and it got me through my first 3 trips until I decided I liked backpacking. After that third trip I went to an REI and got help trying on lots of different packs before laying down a good chunk of cash on my Gregory.

I still use this tent. Although a couple pounds heavier than the one you list its worked out well for me and its less than half the price.

You'll also need some other gear to do overnights. REI has a good list here. Highlights include hydration (something to carry water and a water filter / pump / tablets / whatever), food storage, headlamp / lighting, etc.

Do you live anywhere near an REI? Along with having great staff to chat with about what might want to buy they occasionally have "garage sales" where they have returned / used items at crazy discounts.

u/Vanq86 · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

First I'd make sure you both have all the clothing and footwear you need to be comfortable and the things you'd need for an urban day out (pack, water bottle, some snacks, etc.). Nothing ruins a day like an unexpected blister / rain shower that causes a chill / burned hand from a fire.

After that I'd consider basic survival needs and comforts that might be different in the woods. A small survival kit (and the knowledge required to use it), toilet paper, bug spray, gloves to protect your hands from heat and thorns, a tarp (which you already say you have) to escape the sun or rain, etc.. One suggestion I have that I don't see mentioned often is a lightweight foam kneeling pad. You can get them at the dollar stores in the gardening section usually and for the negligible weight and space they're worth having in my opinion. They are great for kneeling on (obviously), which you'll be doing a lot when practicing bushcraft skills like fire making, and they make a huge difference for the backside when sitting on ground / logs / rocks that are hard / wet / dirty.

With comfort and survival covered you can look at the real 'tools' of bushcraft. The most important thing, in my opinion, is a good knife for each of you. Soooo many projects / skills that are considered 'bushcraft' require / are made easier when you have a decent knife. You don't need to spend a lot (a Mora Companion is a great choice for under 10 dollars), just be sure to do your homework before spending money so you don't end up with something that looks cool but isn't practical for your bushcraft needs.

Beyond the knife I won't go into details about the rest of my suggestions but I think you'll find reasoning behind them fairly self-evident. I've been bushcrafting / camping / hunting for the better part of 2 decades now and all items I list below are all ones that I've personally used many, many times and wouldn't recommend if I didn't find them awesome and reliable. If you look into them further I think you'll find most / all are considered the best 'bang for your buck' option in their given class.


Mora Companion fixed blade knife - carbon or stainless doesn't matter, both are great: ~$12-15

Nalgene leak-proof water bottle - The cheaper HDPE bottle is actually better believe it or not: ~$5-8

Bahco Laplander folding saw - Silky saws are worth the upgrade price in my opinion but are definitely just a 'nice to have', considering Bahcos can't be beat for the price / function / reliability: ~$20-25

Sawyer Mini water filter - filters twice as good as the LifeStraw (0.1 vs 0.2 microns), lasts 10 times longer (100k vs 1k gallons), is much more versatile (you can screw the Sawyer onto a 2 litre coke bottle), and costs less to boot: ~$19

Fiskars X7 hatchet - I know you already have one bust I figured I'd mention it. For a bombproof, light weight, made in Finland hatchet it can't be beat for the price: ~$20-25

Tramontina 18" machete - great balance and blade, just sand or wrap the handle in some tape if yours isn't finished perfectly to avoid potential blisters (this is also where good gloves come in) - ~$15-18

u/usernamespot · 3 pointsr/cycling

Thanks for playing along.

> Busch and Muller Ixon IQ Premium

Good This might be one of the most amazing light out there. Unlike many other lights they recognize that "good" isn't just pumping out tons of lumens. They put the light where it needs to go, on the road and not where it shouldn't be - in drivers eyes and in the trees. Them and Light and Motion have the best optics I've seen. There's a few tunnel beam test out there which show beam patterns well.

This review sold me on the light

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwM7vDvvGhU

They cover the beams at the end.

Now the thing is in this vid he's shooting pitch black, which all lights look bright in. Either way the flood is great.

Bad The high run time is listed at 3hrs (standard pretty much..) which is just long enough or a little too short depending on you. I wish more lights ran 4hrs on high as I take long rides with breaks in the middle. Itd be nice to not worry.

It doesn't have any side cut outs for visibility which do seem to help, even on very low powered lights.

Ugly

The main downfall for this light is its price, which I think is over $100. For some people $100 for one light isn't great. Some people might prefer to spend $100 on a different lighting setup (albeit likely with worse optics).


>Cygolite Hotshot



good

Crazy popular and a pretty neat light. I like the strong strobes and customizable flash settings for traffic

bright, unique flash patterns, affordable, good company.

bad

My big beef is it lacks a gentle pulse like this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UthVrhsbRr4

for group/night trail rides i dont want to blind people. also id love to run a pulse/flasher combo.

PDW (I think) makes a light that combines a crazy flash pattern with a gentle strobe, that might be king...

ugly

lots of complaints about the mount, going back to at lease 2012. last thing i want is to lose a light on a ride w/o knowing.

"This light is great for visibility and can be seen from far away. MAJOR DRAWBACK - the light is mounted to the bike with a very flimsy mount. every time i go over a bump the light is jostled and ends up pointing straight down at the ground which of course defeats the purpose."

http://www.amazon.com/Cygolite-Hotshot-2-Watt-Rechargeable-Taillight/product-reviews/B005DVA57Y/ref=cm_cr_pr_top_recent?ie=UTF8&filterBy=addThreeStar&showViewpoints=0&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending

u/zedmartinez · 4 pointsr/bicycling

If you aren't in a city with notoriously high and advanced bike theft, and aren't leaving it out overnight, try this: http://www.amazon.com/OnGuard-Pitbull-Ls-11-5-4-5/dp/B005YPKBRI/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1463020335&sr=8-3&keywords=onguard+pitbull

The long shackle is technically less secure, because it's easier to leverage open, but in a place without a lot of racks it's a blessing to have, because you can fairly easily find /something/ in short walking distance that'll go around, unlike the smaller Ulocks that mostly only work with racks (or, I've found, bikes without big bags and wide upright handlebars). It's a good medium security lock, and both sides of the shackle lock. Downsides, it's heavy, because big, but not as heavy as a chain which is your next smart option (don't get cable locks, they can be cut soooo easily), and the mounting bracket is OK, but I've had two of them fail. I just carry mine in a bag now.

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1463020570&sr=8-1&keywords=kryptonite+series+2 This is a little lower security lock, but still a mighty fine one in an area with mostly thefts of opportunity. The included cable is for passing through your wheels for a secondary bit of safety. It's the best selling option at the good local bike shop out where I am (Indianapolis).

As for using them, this is the classic guide: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html His method is routinely the best, but without racks it can be hard to lock through the wheel and not the frame. If you can't lock through the wheel, make sure the shackle goes through one of the triangles. And, no matter what, lock to something securely attached to the ground and don't lock to anything the bike can be lifted off and over. Be sure and try lifting any cheap racks you do come across, you'll be surprised how many aren't bolted down right... or at all.

u/AGingham · 3 pointsr/Bushcraft

Depends a lot on what your vision and current understanding of what "Bushcraft" is.

TL;DR: Start basic, check it's for you, be comfortable in a new learning journey.

The craft part of the word is important - it's about actually doing something, not just knowing and understanding the what and why. And certainly not about just possessing things and displaying them.

So - there are two aspects of this - you need to be comfortable "in the woods", and there's the creative aspect of doing and making "stuff" in that environment.

Being comfortable: It's important to be comfortable - otherwise the learning experience aspect is jeopardised. You'll see that some Bushcraft course providers have really minimal kit requirements on their courses, because they provide shelter, food and drink in order to get on with the particular skills they're teaching.

There's a really big marketing led "Leisure Camping" industry in the UK, with a lot of gear aimed at festival goers. If you're starting out on this journey, use all that to your advantage - get a basic tent (but one with a porch so you can sit outside, under cover, to make things and talk with others if you're at a communal event/course), sleeping bag, gas stove.

Pretty much everything else can - and I would suggest should - come from your normal, regular home kit. Perhaps the second-rate things that have been replaced, but not yet scrapped. If you lived with them once - you can do so again. This enables you to maintain home comforts and the security of being able to provide for particular personal necessities - diet, health, cultural etc. as a starting point, and then modify things as you learn more.


You'll find after a couple of outings why some things work "outside" and others just fail: Too heavy, too complicated, too dependent on other infrastructure after time (the gas stove for example).

Just make sure the basic Survival needs are met of:

// Protection / Water / Food / Fire / Navigation / Communication / First Aid, Medical, and Self Care / Illumination / Documentation and Information / Repair, Construction and Maintenance / Entertainment / Cash //

and you can support a good camping experience at the very least.

Turning to the craft - there's so much to observe, learn, understand and practice.

The activities you choose initially will reflect your existing abilities and interests, but some basic skills involve fire starting with just a spark or two - or an ember, careful precision woodworking with knife and small saw, and structure construction, that will likely require cordage and knowledge of knots.

So - a small starter kit specifically for the Craft:

  • ferro-rod and scraper
  • folding saw
  • small fixed-blade knife - and the usual one suggested isn't too bad at all ... Be wary of UK knife law, especially if you are essentially "urban".
  • big hank of paracord. At the beginning you don't need the more exotic types, and natural fiber alternatives may be something you come to appreciate later.


    EDIT: s/hunk/hank - the mind boggles as to a paracord "hunk". Perhaps best not to go there ...
u/MacabreChaos · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I'm a college student, so I totally understand buying cheap stuff. Here are some of my personal finds.

I bought these cute rain boots for myself about a year ago, and they've held up well! They come in a lot of patterns; I have the argyle plaid just because I like plaid, but the polka dots are cute too. :)

I have this scarf in red. It's super warm and comes in multiple colors. :)

I'm pretty attached to my phone, so I have these gloves. I love the knitted pattern, and it's a must for me to still be able to do stuff on my phone while I have gloves on.

I have some heated purple slippers (battery operated) from Sears, and they're really nice since my floor is wood. I have my eye on these adorable slippers though because they're just so cute. I love food with cute faces on them. :D They're kinda pricy though.

Also, Hot Hands are a savior. I would buy them from Walmart or Target; it's cheaper, and you can get however many you want. These kept my hands warm when I was outside in freezing temperatures from midnight to 10 am!

u/alohaepicure · 1 pointr/dji

I went to Iceland this past February and took my Mavic Pro. Some tips I have for you are:

  • Keep your batteries warm! The color temperature can really kill your battery life, or prevent the drone from turning on if the batteries are too cold. I put some of these hand warmers (https://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-Odorless-Activated/dp/B0007ZF4OA/ref=sr_1_3?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1536981832&sr=1-3&keywords=hand+warmers) into a sock and placed them next to my batteries in my backpack. They did wonders to keep things just warm enough to maintain charge, but didn't make me worried at all that the heat would damage the batteries or anything else in the bag.
  • Be careful of the wind! The wind in Iceland can be super unpredictable, especially as you move over steep drops or cliffs. I saw someone lose their Phantom when they flew it up over a ledge (we were standing below a cliff). My best guess is the wind gust above the cliff was much stronger and took the drone in the opposite direction from where we were standing. He tried to throw it into sport mode (I think) and fly it back, but the wind was too strong up over the cliffside.
  • Be prepared to bring your drone back from flight at a moments notice. Again, the weather is unpredictable and can change in minutes. I arrived at a landmark and it was bright/sunny with barely a cloud in sight. I took the drone up and no joke, ten minutes later it was full on snowing with sleet and the entire sky above me was overcast. Just be aware and be ready to bring the drone back when things change. In Iceland they say if you don't like the weather, wait 10 minutes. This is 100% true of my experience in the winter.
  • Be respectful to others. Icelanders are SUCH nice people. If there's a no drone sign I'd really encourage you to respectfully keep the drone in your bag and just enjoy the amazing scenery.
u/ForrestSmith151 · 2 pointsr/hiking

First Aid Kit - you might not need it ever, but you should always have it. All kits are different but there are fundamental items that should be carried, you can check out the NOLS Kits
and either buy one or for less, make your own that is custom to your needs and desires.

Tools - First, carry a knife that can cut decent size branches, again, you might not need it but its good to have. Second, I recommend getting a water filter such as a Sawyer mini or Katadyn Be Free as they are both lightweight and will probably decrease your pack weight if you hike near water. Third, Fire can be helpful in many situations but must be used carefully and with respect. If you live somewhere that allows it, a wood burning camp stove will be worth some warmth and also allow you to cook if you bring along a mess set. I personally use an MSR Pocket Rocket. As a day hiker, you might not use a stove often but it's not bad to have if you do longer hikes or are far from civilization so if that's the case, look into tablet stoves. generally, you should have a lighter or two just in case. You may also consider carrying a survival blanket just in case (as goes for most these objects).

The Front Pouch - So the idea behind having this pouch is to have things that you want quick access too on the trail, the most important of which is your map. Navigation is important when hiking so if you're not familiar with an area buy a map and bring a compass. I personally don't use a compass but I've learned how to navigate without one, however you should always have a map. You may also need to have a permit for some hiking areas and it's nice to have within reach, usually with your map. you may also like to have TP and a camp trowel in there so that it is not hard to find at the wrong moment. along with that, a trash bag of any kind should be carried. Finally, carry snacks in there so that you don't have to dig around to find them.

Summary - This is all advice from a Backpacker so there will be many things you don't need on every hike but could save your life if you get caught in a bad situation, many of the objects I recommend are the same. If I'm close to home or not going out too far on a day hike, I usually carry a Knife, Be Free Filter, Lighter/Stove (depending on mileage) an extra coat, and extra food, but each hike and hiker are different. You will eventually find a system that works well for you, but it's always good to carry things that make life on the trail easier and can get you through a night in the wild. With thought on my comment, you should also check out the Ten Essentials as they will almost always be worth their weight.

If you have any other questions feel free to ask!

u/admckillip · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

I was reluctant to try trekking poles because I thought I didn't need them and I had been hiking for years. To try out poles I snagged some Cascade Mountain Tech and I now really like them. Life savers for elevation and spiderwebs, haha.

For a cheap, but decent pair to try you could grab [these] (https://www.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Trekking-Climbing/dp/B01055BZDA/ref=pd_sbs_468_2?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B01055BZDA&pd_rd_r=AHB8XKJMJ4XVHCWDZ7TE&pd_rd_w=QLBlN&pd_rd_wg=UGPPr&psc=1&refRID=AHB8XKJMJ4XVHCWDZ7TE) ($20) and see if you like them. Cascade Mountaion Tech are generally considered the best cheap trekking poles, and you can upgrade if you do? I went middle of the road on those up above, and they're good enough to not upgrade, but saving 5-7 oz on mine with better poles would have been nice weight savings on something you pick up and put down constantly (way more than 5-7 oz in your pack). SO, my thought is, if you're not sure. By super cheap, and if you like trekking poles, buy nice and light YMMV.

I had the HV UL2 and ended up returning it. It was pretty darn nice, but I wanted something that was lighter, felt a bit more durable, and more flexible in terms of options for pitching so I grabbed the [Tarptent Saddle] (https://www.tarptent.com/saddle2.html). When I'm using the inner, on the saddle I feel ZERO need for a footprint, but I did with the Copper Spur, though you could always just repair... I also like that if there are no bugs I can pitch just the Saddle Outer Tarp with a ground sheet and total weight would be about 20 Oz. Either tent are pretty good options though.

EDIT: Added context.

u/dinhertime_9 · 1 pointr/Ultralight

Tent: Tarptent Notch - $314, 1P, 28oz (w/ stakes), trekking pole supported

Pack: If you order the HMG Windrider from backcountry.com (which currently has a 20% off coupon), you can easily return if it doesn't fit; the return label is only like $7. FWIW I have the HMG Southwest and it's my favorite piece of gear.

Warm Jacket: I'm sure someone can explain better, but a fleece is better for active warmth; it breathes and allows sweat/moisture to pass through. A down jacket is better for static warmth; it blocks wind and has a greater warmth to weight ratio. REI Magma 850 Down Hoodie is only $109 right now and a good entry/budget option from what I've read. The North Face TKA 100 Glacier Quarter-Zip Pullover is a good fleece option ($55 retail).

Trekking Poles: Cascade Mountain Tech, there are a few options but the cork handle with quick lock mechanism is the most popular I think: https://www.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Collapsible-Trekking/dp/B00XM0YGW8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1542382742&sr=8-3&keywords=cascade+mountain+tech+carbon+fiber+quick+lock+trekking+poles

u/pointblankjustice · 10 pointsr/bugout

There is a lot wrong with this list, so I'm just going to work down it one by one with my thoughts on the matter.

USB flameless lighter? Why? That is going to be unreliable, at best. Throw a few BIC lighters and some stormproof matches in there and be done with it. IF you want to be fancy, get something built to be rugged, that will stand up to use in the field:

https://www.amazon.ca/Ultimate-Survival-Technologies-Floating-Lighter/dp/B00C85NBA6/ref=sr_1_2?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173178&sr=1-2&keywords=camping+lighter

Speaking of, I didn't see any sort of firestarting material. Warmth is going to be important, and you need as few steps as possible between you and fire. Get some quality firestarters. I am trying to keep all my links relevant from amazon.ca, so some of the brands I'm most familiar with aren't there. But these work well (though there are options from Wetfire and other brands that take up less space):

https://www.amazon.ca/Ultimate-Survival-Technologies-Fire-Stix/dp/B00C6SHODK/ref=sr_1_20?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173338&sr=1-20&keywords=emergency+fire+starter

What is with the mall-ninja "tactical" hatchet? That is a lot of weight and not a lot of utility. You'd be better served with a reliable and lightweight folding saw, and a good full-tang fixed-blade knife. Something like a 7 inch Corona saw:

https://www.amazon.ca/Corona-Cutting-Tools-RS-7041/dp/B00004R9YN/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173467&sr=1-1&keywords=corona+folding+saw

If you insist on carrying a hatchet (and their function in a bugout situation is debatable, especially for the weight) get something quality like an Estwing:

https://www.amazon.ca/Estwing-E24A-14-Inch-Sportmans-Sheath/dp/B00BNQR4SG/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173510&sr=1-1&keywords=estwing+hatchet

Nothing wrong with duct tape, but you'd do well to wrap just maybe 3-4 meters of it around a small core (like from doggy waste bags, or even just around itself).

The self-crank radio/flashlight/phone charger is shit. You also don't need four lights, especially if all of them are crap. Buy one good flashlight, and maybe one good headlamp.

A flashlight like a Nitecore P12 or something that runs on an 18650 and offers long runtime would be ideal. If you buy a diffuser cap for it, you can replace the lantern. Pick up some spare, high quality 18650 cells, as well. The P12 has SOS and beacon modes, which will run for days at a time, in addition to a nice throw and excellent brightness on Medium and High.

https://www.amazon.ca/Nitecore-Flashlight-Lumens-Meters-Distance/dp/B00PQE1D2E/ref=sr_1_2?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173859&sr=1-2&keywords=nitecore+P12

As for headlamps, those don't need to be super bright. You want something with enough brightness and floodiness to work around camp. But ideally you also want a red-light or low-light mode for night time, when you don't need to destroy your night vision just because you need to take a piss or something.

https://www.amazon.ca/TACTIKKA-CONSTANT-LIGHTING-HEADLAMP-DESERT/dp/B00GCGIGHK/ref=sr_1_14?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173989&sr=1-14&keywords=petzl+headlamp

The powerbank thing in the crank radio is crap, only 1000mah. Not enough to charge most modern smart phones even 25%. Figure that of that 1000mah, ~25% will be lost just due to inefficiency in the charging process. Get a 10,000mah or bigger high quality battery, with 2.1A ports, and be done with it:

https://www.amazon.ca/Anker-PowerCore-Portable-Ultra-Compact-High-speed-Charging-Technology/dp/B0194WDVHI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482173708&sr=8-1&keywords=anker+usb+power+bank

Combine the money you'd spend on the shitty folding knife and the shitty Gerber multitool, and buy a proper multi-tool. You don't need two folding knives.

The Leatherman Wingman is a good value, though I prefer a nicer quality one like the Charge TTi, but at four times the price it may not be worth it just for an S30V blade.

https://www.amazon.ca/Leatherman-2996-831426-Wingman-Multi-Tool/dp/B005DI0XM4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482174264&sr=8-1&keywords=leatherman+wave

Ditch the camp toilet paper, that stuff is like wiping your ass with cardboard. Get some biodegradable camp wipes from an outdoor store. You can now use these to clean your ass, and they also are useful for wiping your hands, or taking whore baths.

Same with the camp soap. Are you bugging out or camping for a week? Nothing you are going to do in a bugout situation is going to necessitate body soap. Toothbrush, floss, deodorant.

Ditch the giant first aid kit full of crap you don't need. Those things are heavy and 80 of the 85 pieces are just different sized bitch stickers. Build your own first aid kit tailored around the likely injuries you would face: sprains, cuts, burns. Maybe throw some Quik Clot Z-pack gauze or a tourniquet (CAT or similar) in there for larger trauma, if that is a concern to you. Limit the bitch stickers to 5-10. All gauze, tape, trauma pads, alcohol wipes, tincture of iodine, moleskin for blisters, tweezers, surgical shears, gloves, maybe burn cream. Small containers of medications you might need: aspirin, antihistamines like Diphenhydramine, anti-diarrheals, etc.

That survival paracord bracelet thing is garbage. You already have 100ft of paracord in your list (which you could probably cut down to 50ft). You don't need some shitty firestarter, whistle, and compass thing. Buy a real lensatic sighting compass. Not going to do you much good without a map and the ability to understand it, anyway.

https://www.amazon.ca/UST-Survival-Essentials-Lensatic-Compass/dp/B005X1YI3Q/ref=sr_1_5?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482174799&sr=1-5&keywords=compass

You have both a cookset AND a mug/pot. This is extra redundant and not needed in a bugout situation. Stick to food you don't have to prepare. Caloric density is your friend. Jerky, EPIC bars, Clif bars, etc.

If you need to boil water, use a single-wall metal canteen (NOT a thermos). Remove the plastic lid, fill with water, set in your fire. Widemouth canteens like those by Klean Kanteen are multi-purpose (multipurpose is your friend). You can sterilize water, you can cook and eat food out of it (because of the large opening), and you can fill with hot water, wrap in a sock, and warm your sleep system.

https://www.amazon.ca/Klean-Kanteen-Stainless-Bottle-27-Ounce/dp/B0027W6WHE/ref=sr_1_sc_4?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482174908&sr=1-4-spell&keywords=klean+kanteen+widemouth

You don't need a can opener if you have a good multitool.

Lifestraws suck ass. They only work as a straw, and I am going to guess you don't want to get your water by drinking out of puddles exclusively. Get a Sawyer Squeeze mini filter. This can be used in-line with a hydration bladder, can be used like a Lifestraw, or can be used to filter an fill your water storage containers/bladder:

https://www.amazon.ca/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175065&sr=1-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

One seriously lacking area for you is your sleep system. A tarp and a space blanket are not going to keep you functionally warm. You might survive a night, but you won't be useful the next day.

At the BARE minimum, you should get a good, reflective, breathable bivvy sack, like this one from SOL, AND a sleeping pad. A bivvy will reflect heat back onto you, helping with heat lost through convection, but no sleeping bag will help with heat lost through conduction (you touching the cold ground). That is why a sleeping pad is mandatory. I have used the Escape bivvy and the Klymit pad linked here together, and both kept me comfortably warm to about 50 degrees F. Below that, I've had to augment with base layers or jackets, and that still sucked. If you are hoping to sleep in below freezing temperatures, you'll need a properly sorted ultralight sleeping bag.

https://www.amazon.ca/Adventure-Medical-Kits-Escape-Bivvy/dp/B00EVGD0FQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175280&sr=1-1&keywords=SOL+escape

https://www.amazon.ca/Klymit-06SVGR01C-Camping-Mattress-Green-Grey/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175199&sr=1-1&keywords=sleep+pad

Other recommendations of mine would be to take survival, medical and foraging guides and put them on a smartphone, along with a GPS mapping software and pre-downloaded offline topographical maps at 1:24k resolution of your main bugout areas and 1:100k resolution elsewhere. Something like Gaia GPS for iOS or Backcountry Navigator Pro for Android:

u/uski · 78 pointsr/preppers

A few more ideas :

I would suggest having a battery-powered FM radio (and extra batteries if it's battery powered, or get one which charges via USB like the one I linked) to listen to the news and get vital information.

Also (if not too late), order a sawyer mini (best) or lifestraw (not as good). If you don't have access to clean water it can help you stay healthy (beware of chemical contamination which cannot be removed by these).

If you have the money, get a Garmin inReach satellite communicator (requires a (relatively cheap) subscription, down to $15ish a month). You can request SOS (much like 911), and send/receive SMS and e-mails, even without cell coverage. Excellent to keep in touch with relatives and in case of emergency. Can be used year-round when hiking, snow-mobile, skiing, ... Don't tell anyone you have this...

Download the offline map of your area on Google Maps on your phone beforehand. Can be priceless to navigate around and doesn't require internet access. Also get the Maps.Me app and download the map of your area too. Google Maps offline maps will expire and disappear from your phone after 30 days (I believe), Maps.Me maps will not.

If the cell service in your area is out of order, use your phone in airplane mode so that it doesn't continuously and desperately looks for a cell to connect to, which will drain the battery VERY quickly. Also use it on the lowest practical brightness setting to save battery power.

If not too late, get big USB power banks (>=10000mAh such as this one) and fully charge them beforehand. It's good as barter items and it can be nice to recharge your things when you have no access to a generator (on the go, or if you don't want to run the generator to avoid attracting attention). You can also get USB lights (this one for instance) and your powerbank doubles as a flashlight with a very long battery life.

Get a first aid kit, and not just one with bandaids... Get a CAT tourniquet, trauma dressing, Celox (preferred) or QuikClot bandage, triangular bandage, SAM splint, ... and know how to use them. Also get the basic medecines (stomach/diarrhea relief, basic painkillers, anti-allergy, and any prescription medecine if you require any). Remember 911 service may be unavailable for some time and you need to be able to take care of injuries. Tourniquets save lives, everyone should have one readily available.

​

I am a radio amateur and in these situations I like to have one or two portable radio for two-way communication but I realize it is not for everybody. Still, a pair of FRS/GMRS radio can be helpful. Please note that GMRS requires a (cheap) license in the USA. I would recommend this model which also allows to be used as a scanner and to program the NOAA weather frequencies (do it beforehand) and some local police/EMS/fire frequencies (if allowed in your juridiction).

Please DO NOT use a radio made for amateur radio use, where you can transmit on any frequency, such as the UV-5R; you may interfere with emergency communications, even if you can't hear them, miles away. Please stick to the FRS/GMRS frequencies. The radio above guarantees safe operation and still allows to be used as a scanner.

​

Take pictures of all your important documents (ID, properties, ...) and store them in a waterproof plastic bag. Try to keep at least your passport and driver license with you during the storm...

If you have a sump pump, try to arrange so that it can be battery powered and/or connected to your generator. If using battery power, get a battery charger and/or a generator connection, if the outage lasts and the battery runs down. Sometimes homes are not affected by the main storm but are flooded due to the lack of power around the storm and are still ruined, and that's totally preventable.

Also, beforehand, depending of the situation you might want to BLOCK your main sewage pipe. This way you might avoid sewage backflow into your home. There are normally valves already installed but in case of serious flooding (high backpressure) they sometimes are not up to the task.

​

Download a few offline movies on the Netflix app (if you have Netflix). I never lived though a hurricane but I assume after a few days/weeks, you might want some entertainment. You can also download e-books. Bonus if it's survival-related e-books.

​

Hope this helps... good luck to those affected


PS: oooo, thank you stranger for the gold, I think I never had one before ! Happy prepping :)

u/Magneticitist · 1 pointr/knives

In that case I was also thinking for a budget of $200 you could get him a nice fixed blade and a nice folding pocket knife. Without more details you may have to just go with your gut feeling on a couple of the more popular brands mentioned since they rarely fail to please. Fallkniven, Benchmade, Bark River, Buck..

The Buck 110 is always a well received pocket knife and I would happily receive any of their fixed hunting knives.

I've also read that Morakniv makes a great all around blade even for working with game. I love all the Mora's I own and the best thing about them is the price. You could add one of those in for only an extra 15 bucks and it may end up being a really well used knife he likes and can beat up using it for things he may not want to do with his nice pretty knife his wife got him. Just a possible thought there if you can't land that perfect single knife for him. A nice little folder, solid fixed blade that will last and he can admire, and an all around utility knife covering all 3 bases.

u/sim_pl · 1 pointr/travel

48L is pretty small if you are going to be doing any sort of camping etc. I'd recommend at least looking at a 60-65. Anyways, that's not what you are asking.

As far as cheap but sturdy, I bought both the Teton Fox for myself and the Teton Sports Explorer for my girlfriend and found them to be both fairly reliable. This was for an 8 week backpacking trip where I stayed in hostels through Europe (my gf was there for 5 of the weeks), so it didn't go through the rigor of camping, through I'd be willing to say that they would be entirely adequate.

For you, I would say that maybe the Scout or the Summit could be good matches.

Another advantage of going this cheap is that even if the backpack ends up breaking (again, not likely on the first trip), you'll be in a better position to understand what you do and don't like about it.

Oh and don't forget a raincover if they aren't built in.

TL;DR: Teton makes good cheap backpacks but I don't have experience with the smaller sizes. Also think about a slightly larger backpack.

Edit: Forgot to mention that I bought mine without trying it on first and it was close to the perfect size (could have used slightly longer straps over the shoulder, I'm 6'1"), but I have some decent experience with backpacks. For the most part, if you read enough of the reviews you'll find people of certain sizes fitting/not fitting.

Edit dos: Even more thoughts. It's free to try on backpacks in stores, and worth your time just to get accustomed to what the various sizes actually feel like and what sort of features you like. Once you try a few you'll get the hang of it.

u/Call_Me_Salamander · 3 pointsr/UCDavis

When it comes to books, you should always wait until the first day of class so the professor goes over what you will need for the course. For some classes you might not even need a book at all! You will not be using the book very much if at all the first week of the quarter so you will be perfectly fine waiting until the first day or two to order your books! I recommend avoiding the bookstore because it tends to be overpriced. Amazon has much better deals if you want a new book. For used books, join the Textbooks for Sale Facebook page, which is part of the UC Davis groups on Facebook. Also, many people obtain their books in PDF format online or through others who have taken the course. While this is not legal, it does provide for a very cheap alternative to buying your books (but again, it is illegal in most cases unless the publisher has explicitly released the book online in PDF format free of charge!)

I live in West Village as well actually! If you are in a furnished apartment you will get a bed, desk, nightstand and dresser to yourself. You also get a TV stand, living room table, dining table, and a sofa included that you will share. I recommend coordinating with your housemates on what to bring. That is what I did and it is way better than bringing 4 sets of silverware, plates, etc. Is there anything specific you'd like to know about that you should bring? The bare minimum (computer, clothes, kitchen utensils) is what I brought and I am doing just fine!

As for bikes, I recommend a single speed or standard road bike for commuting. The commute from West Village to the middle of campus on bike is 5-7 minutes depending on how fast you biking.

If you are looking to spend under $300 then buy a nice, used road bike when you get to Davis. There is a Bikes for Sale page for UC Davis on Facebook that is regularly updated! Craigslist works fine too. If you are looking to spend $300 or more, ($300 to $500 can get you a good quality bike that will last you throughout college) I recommend checking out this website: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/road_bikes.htm

I personally ride a Single Speed and I love it! It has no gears so you don't need to worry about shifting. It is lightweight, fast, and reliable. I have the Windsor The Hour from BikesDirect (it was $300 when I got it). I recommend the Mercier Kilo TT if they have it in stock (it is extremely popular so it is hard to find in stock). Otherwise the Dawes SST AL and Windsor TheHour/Clockwork are great too!

Let me know if you have any other questions!

Edit: I almost forgot! Thanks for reminding me /u/nTranced. A good U-lock is a must in Davis. Bike theft isn't extremely common but it does happen from time to time. If you have a nice bike make sure it is locked up with a U-lock. I personally recommend this lock as it is a good combination of price and effectiveness: http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1405012899&sr=8-1&keywords=kryptonite+bike+lock

u/defacedlawngnome · 3 pointsr/bicycling

For tail lights I highly recommend the Planet Bike SuperFlash, PDW Radbot 1000 and PDW Danger Zone. Here's a direct link to Portland Design Works' selection of lights. I can't speak for PDW headlights as I have yet to purchase one but the quality of their tail lights is outstanding. All three of these lights cost $25-$30. I purchased them on Amazon.

As for a headlight I use a Fenix LD20 which will set you back $60 but the light is way better than any dedicated bicycle light with the same output (180 lumens @ 2xAA) for that price (e.g. Light & Motion/Magic Shine/NiteRider/etc). The LD20 can be used as an EDC with an assortment of attachments which can also be used on your bike. I've been experimenting with the white diffuser tip and have found that it provides a great 360 degree illumination of my bike at night when mounted on the down tube.

You can mount the light just about anywhere on your bike with either this mount or this one. The first I use on the handlebars and second I use to mount the light on my helmet. They're also good for mounting a lock on the frame.
I also invested in a pack of Sanyo Eneloop rechargeable Ni-MH batteries on amazon.

Whatever lights you decide on settling with I strongly recommend they take AA or AAA batteries as CR123's and 18650's are expensive and hard to come by when on the road.

You can never have too many lights. I've invested over $140 in several lights to be better seen and that's much cheaper than having to pay a hospital bill because I wasn't illuminated enough.

Lastly, I recommend the Delta Airzound Air Horn. This thing is a beast and impresses everyone that sees it and scares many that hear it. It has saved me from two very near collisions at night when my lights just weren't enough because the drivers weren't paying attention at all.

u/glombus · 1 pointr/chibike
  • These giro winterproof shoe covers have been lifesavers when I want to wear normal shoes/non-boots. I just wear them with my gym shoes and platform pedals and they work fine. They're not waterproof, but they're water-resistant enough and warm. I've found they're good enough that my shoes keep totally dry in snowfall. Just don't try except them to stave off heavy rain
  • champion base layers from Target keep my legs just warm enough. I don't even wear the thermals, but I'm sure they'd be great
  • Topside's helmet light is bi-directional (front and back) and really bright with steady and blinking modes. I find it's handy to have a light this high up when visibility is tough in winter
  • Showerpass waterproof socks are fantastic if you think your shoes are going to get soaked. I've had days where my shoes are drenched from the rain but these keep my feet dry. The only downside is they get a bit clammy if your shoes are soaked

    I typically adjust my helmet so I can just put my hoodie or a normal winter hat under it, which keeps me pretty warm on my ears and head. Barring that, a balaclava is nice too

    I have yet to find gloves that are good enough to keep my hands from freezing so I often take the time at lights to rub my hands together. I really want to try out Bar Mitts or similar "pogies". I keep Hot Hands in my backpack in case of emergencies

    I've found that cheap light waterproof non-breathable jackets can be helpful because they're thin and really trap heat. Most rain shells are breathable so they don't suffocate you in warmer weather, but I've found that the crappy non-breathable ones are great for winter for that same reason. I can go with just a sweatshirt and one of those and I'm usually sweating by the end in freezing temps. The only problem is I have to keep moving. It's useless if my body's not doing work to keep the heat building up, which is problematic if you may get stuck somewhere remote.

    I want some clear glasses as well, for windy/snowy days when the precipitation stings my eyes. I think something like these would probably do the trick. REI sells, Tifosi, a brand of bike glasses, but I think these would be overkill for me
u/fruntbuttt · 2 pointsr/backpacking

I hike the mountains in MT multiple times a month. Mostly day hikes but I also do 1-5 day trips whenever possible. I prefer the cold so my gear is oriented to that. I won’t give full descriptions but I’ll link you what I use very comfortably. You can check the items out up/downgrade as needed. At least you’ll have an idea of what can work.


Also, the bulk of my gear money is spent on comfort clothing, not the main items I list below. All wool. Head to toe. Can score nice wool at the good will/thrift store sometimes. Good luck!


Tent – 110.00 got mine on sale for 75.00 so look for deals


sleeping bag – ICW 84.95. I’m certain I paid less so shop around


backpack – Tenzig 2220. 149.95. Most comfortable pack I’ve owned. Currently year 2 of using it. I think I paid 200 so this might be a good deal


Boots – for day hike I use Field Blazer – 100ish bucks for above 0, and Woody Elite – 200ish bucks for below 0.


For multi day trips with no snow I use Ventilator – About 100ish bucks. They have low and mid. I own both but prefer the low.



My kit is always evolving but these are some things I always carry no matter what -


--My knife + ferrocerium rod. (I put hundreds of dollars into my knives - but you can carry a mora for 10.00)

--A lifestraw. (10 bucks?)

--My own medkit (pieced together based on needs over the years) (10-25ish bucks?)

--Extra socks. (Good wool socks - 6-15 bucks)

--Day hike - plastic military canteen. (buck or two at thrift) Multi day - Stainless steel cup/bottle system (40-80+ bucks, or can go aluminum for short term and half the price)

--Paracord + tarp. (15 bucks or less for both and in good weather + fire the tent isn't even necessary with these. If the bears are out I always use a tent though)

--Pocket fishing kit I made with extra fishing line. (5 bucks)


What's in my pocket - Bic lighter, phone, compass, chapstick, whistle, hand warmer packx3, instant coffee.


This is for me, solo hiking in the mountains. I often carry much more depending on what i'm out to do, but these are items that in my experience will never leave my pack. I also always carry my Alaskan.

u/Charming_geek · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

Hey all. Relatively new to the ultralight scene, but have been trying to go lighter weight over the last few years. Will probably still be a while before I'm true ultralight (6lbs for the big 4?), but my current plan would have me at 7-7.5 lbs for the big 4. Was curious about your input / any suggestions for improvements:

  • Tent - Naturehike CloudUp2 (owned) - $120, 3.30 lbs (shared with wife, 1.65 lbs)
  • Pad - Klymit Static V (owned) - Bought for $50, 1.15 pounds
  • Bag - Mountaintop 40 Liter Hiking Backpack (owned) - Bought for $27 in an amazon lightning sale, 2.05 lbs.
  • Sleeping bag - Hyke & Byke Eolus 15 degree 800 FP down bag (plan to buy) - $150, 2.54 lbs

    Overall, $350/7.4 lbs for the big 4. I definitely know there's room for improvement and I will probably be replacing things as I can afford it. The most obvious place for improvement is the bag, but I'd actually bought one for my wife as a temporary hiking bag for our first hike-in camp together but we ended up both really liking it. It's comfortable and for $27 it was hard to pass up, especially as it has all the compartments I like in a hiking bag (i.e. access to the bottom section for the sleeping bag). Welcome to criticisms and suggestions.
u/Flagrant_Geek · 1 pointr/CampingGear

The closest thing I used to a life straw is the "Soldier water filter". An ultra small membrane type filter built inside a real tiny hand pump.

While it worked incredibly well as a filter, as a pumping device it sucked. Took circa 30 minutes of minutia pumping while crouched by a water source to suck up a single liter of water.

To me those straw, look more like a last resort type of water filter for similar reasons. They probably work well as a filter but are rather tedious to use. They have a truly limited use scenario.

Also because of it's method of use you are likely not to be fully hydrated as you will likely not drink as much as actually needed for long hikes in hot weather, as it's designed to be only used at the water source. Water sources can be rather far apart. Good sucking skills are also required.

I have images in my head of sucking that straw until I turn blue with my face suspended a few inches above the lake or river bank attempting to suck water then sliding and falling into the water while simply attempting to have a drink.

I don't know about you but it seems likely to produce some rather comical photo opportunities for other hikers while simply attempting to get a drink.

I personally used the Katadyn 6L base camp water filter (The revised Version #2) and found it an amazing high speed device that allowed me to filter enough water to fill my 3L bladder and cook dinner and breakfast as well as provide water for other hikers with me. This each and every night at base camp. This in a mater of minutes. it filters really fast. An entire days supply only takes minutes.

Aside this I would perhaps consider the Sawyer squeeze filter, which is somewhat similar but designed for smaller quantities of water. You don't have to suck until you turn blue.

Simply fill bag and squeeze, Around a liter per squeeze bags and is about the size of a life straw while stored in your bag. This is the real economical yet highly functional solution. Small, compact. The only draw back is you have to do this multiple times a day. Other than that it's the perfect kit.

Katadyn and a few others make better hand pump type water filter that are more usable than what I had. However they are truly cost prohibitive and I personally cant see why pay this much makes sense for me.

In the end for me it's a gravity filter, less work, fast, more quantity per water pull from lakes and rivers and fast easy filtering. It is a real blessing to have ease of use, when tired and having to setup camp and prep food etc. I cant say a single bad thing about that filter, yet.

Albeit I have read some rather bad reviews on the same filter I use, but so far it's not my experience with them. Not a single issue ever...

u/Huskie407 · 1 pointr/CampingGear

I would not recommend this. choices differ between if you are backpacking/hiking to a camp or just driving in/car camping. Gear can be expensive or reasonable but If you are just starting out, I would not recommend buying expensive gear before you know what provides you value. Everyone's different so some questions only you will be able to answer once you go a few times. I would recommend going conservative on cost to start out until you know what you prefer (Checking out other peoples gear on camping trips/ REI browsing sessions are a gold mine)

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Sleeping Bag depending on what the night time low temps are (based mostly on how high the elevation youre going to be sleeping at this time of year) you don't need a sleeping bag, I would instead recommend a light packable down quilt like the one from Costco or This cost: $20-$40

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pricier sleeping bag option

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XE2SKG2/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=darwionthe-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B00XE2SKG2&linkId=faa0813c08ae84dc66e192d16eef9fde

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Sleeping Pad Basic sleeping pad :https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LZWW2FD/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=darwionthe-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B01LZWW2FD&linkId=7f466defe405f13e4d8f457436a33b6c $35-$40

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I personally use the Klymit Static V, You can get them refurbished for very little on Amazon/Ebay

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Tent Lots of options here, a few of them good for a low price. Decision is if you're going to be going solo or taking company (Size) and again how light you want to go on the weight. Freestanding tents generally provide more shelter but can be hotter in the summer and generally heavier. Some people choose only a light tarp setup for ultralight backpacking. its a personal choice but I would definitely take some time to think what suits your need on this. A few options.

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(requires trekking poles) light

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01J9XWJEI/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=darwionthe-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B01J9XWKHY&linkId=df511cfe28f404892810dfcda5f5560d&th=1&psc=1

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Freestanding option $112

https://www.amazon.com/Kelty-Salida-Camping-Backpacking-Tent/dp/B00NFCFO0Q/ref=sr_1_1?qid=1563337921&s=gateway&sr=8-1

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Cheaper $95

https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Lynx-1-Person-Tent/dp/B00BMKD1DU/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=1p+tent&qid=1563338006&s=gateway&sr=8-3

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For the tent I would recommend spending a little more if you are strictly buying for car camping, itll have more longevity and youll be using it for a few years. This is my car camping tent. $260

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https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00M87LPMU/ref=twister_B07BWCR88J?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

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I would highly recommend investing in some permethrin/bug spray, a good hat and a Head Net to go along with it.

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Happy trails.

u/SacredUrchin · 11 pointsr/CampingGear

I haven't used that backpack you're looking at but I can tell from its design, that it doesn't look like it'll carry the weight comfortably if you're planning on a 3 day backpacking trip in wilderness. This pack is probably better for normal travel so if you're car camping and have access to amenities then this pack should do fine. It also doesn't look big enough to carry a tent, sleeping bag, food, water, etc.

Assuming you'll be deeper in wilderness and using a tent, sleeping bag, pad, etc., I would recommend something that will carry comfortably (aim weight toward your hips and reduce weight on your back) and there are better options out there. You'd want a backpacking backpack at least and you can probably find lots of options within (or close to) your budget.
Below are a few suggestions within a few different price ranges (not sure how strict your budget is).
Side note: I used to own the previous version of the Teton - it was my first backpack - for the price it did a pretty good job and never had any major complaints:

TETON Sports Scout 3400 60L

Mountaintop 55L Backpacking Pack

Mountaintop 65L Internal Frame Backpack Hiking Backpack with Rain Cover

50L Hiking Backpack EocuSun Waterproof Camping Backpack Outdoor Sport Lightweight Backpacking Bag

Hope this helps - have fun on your trip!

u/theinfamousj · 103 pointsr/AskWomen

So, I just went through my Amazon orders and pretty much every single thing I saw that I bought for myself I thought was the best thing I ever purchased.

With great pain and strain, I narrowed it down to these three things:

  • Inflatable Japanese Soaking Tub // I've always desired a deep bathtub that is in the Japanese soaking tub style. I had dreams of remodeling my bathroom to put in such a bathtub but when I priced it out the price tag had a lot of figures and made me very nervous. This device packs up to the size of two furled full size golf umbrellas side-by-side, but also fits into my existing bathtub and creates the soaking tub I so desire. Oh, and it cost under $100. Far less than a bathroom reno.

  • Klymit Static V Insulated // It truly is a super crazy comfortable sleeping pad/mat for side sleepers. I camp with a quilt, rather than a sleeping bag, but that hasn't been a problem.

  • ThermaRest Ultralight Cot Knock Off // At $40 vs $100+ for the name brand, but with the additional cost of 2 lbs, I am really happy with this cot. It is delightfully comfortable and I use it when traveling. I can sleep on my side without any sore spots developing.

    Edited to add links.
u/Ksrugi · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I grew up in Louisiana and always had these at the ready in case another Katrina came by. Barebones and lightweight in case you need to get up and move.


Multitool - Something that's sturdy, offers plenty of options, but also is lightweight. If I got washed out, this would be one of the top things I'd want coming with me.

First Aid Kit - You just never know. Water can hide a lot of nasty stuff like sharp metal edges, broken glass, etc. The kit I've linked to also comes with a multitool.
Water Filtration System - Dehydration will get you before anything else. Southern heat combined with physical exertion takes a lot out of anyone and tiny filtration systems like this will take care of you without adding bulk.

Meal Replacement Bars - You'll ideally want a few days emergency food. I recommend meal replacement bars that are high in protein and fiber and no less than 500 calories. They'll provide decent nutrition and should make you feel satiated for at least 2-4 hours. I don't have a recommendation on this one because there are so many brands and flavors.
Hand Crank Lantern - A reliable source of light that you can crank on your own. Generally, I avoid using generators and the like. I'm paranoid about electricity after flooding occurs.

Whistle - Great for alerting people without tearing up your vocal chords. It's also very, very, very good to have in case animals that shouldn't come by are nearby.
Dust Mask - If your city floods, there's going to be a lot of crud that comes up from the sewers and a lot of things accumulating inside buildings. Save your lungs and your noses.
Portable Battery - I love this age of technology we're in. Charge this a few days before the storm hits and you'll be able to keep your phone charged for days if the power goes out.
Insect Repellant - The ample amount of still water after a hurricane is prime bug nesting. A little repellant goes a long way.
Paddle Your Own Canoe by Nick Offerman - Or any book really to help pass the time. This is a fantastic read though. :)

u/Trailman80 · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

You really need to go and try some packs out or better yet Buy a few and load it with what you think you will be carrying do not have the store people stuff bags in there it's not the same as having gear in there they fell much more different. I ended up with a Osprey Black and a Green Pack. I also have a Kelty Lakota 65 for longer hikes.

Osprey is the lighter of the Brands Gregory and Kelty are more heavier and more durable, but if you take care of the packs even the ultra light ones will last you. For $150 you won't be getting the Higher end packs they cost more then that, Or you can try a REI Garage sale and get lucky.

Trips like the one's you posted are great for light packs like the Osprey 65 you can pack a bunch in that pack and still feel like nothing is on your back. The only thing I don't like about Osprey is the side zippers I am a larger man and they don't work too well with my form lol.

This TETON Sports is a great pack it's not the lightest but for the money and the ENTIRE pack is nylon so it's tough as nails, I used it for a few year before upgrading to a lighter packs. I do not regret this at all.

here is a new version

https://www.amazon.com/Sports-Adventurer-Ultralight-Backpacking-Mountaineering/dp/B016ZXEDCQ/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_sims?ie=UTF8

https://www.amazon.com/Sports-Internal-ALUMINUM-Backpack-Backpacking/dp/B000F34ZKS/ref=sr_1_5?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1500753362&sr=1-5&keywords=hiking%2Bbackpack&th=1

u/anachronic · 6 pointsr/camping

I love my Klymit. The thing folds up to the size of a Nalgene bottle and is way more comfortable than you'd expect. I'm 5'10, 190lbs and like to sleep on my side and sleep great on this.

Other alternative (which is decidedly NOT convenient and is bulky, but is insanely comfortable if you're going car camping or using it stationary in your apartment and don't need to lug it around) is getting a memory foam mattress like this. I pull this out when friends crash at my apartment and they have all raved about how comfy it is. It's also great for cold weather camping, since the foam is a great insulator. I had this one on a trip that got down to 37 overnight and it kept me super toasty.

u/RevLoveJoy · 4 pointsr/CyclePDX

Waterproof gloves.

I know you said you have shoes, but these covers are reasonable. I'm not a huge fan of the color, but winter above the 45 parallel is a dark time of the year and a little extra "I'M HERE" never hurts.

This jacket might seem a little expensive, however I own a few Shower Pass items and cannot say enough good stuff about the quality, durability and comfort of their gear. In my book, they are one of the best wet weather bike clothing outfits around.

There are a TON of options for lighting. Basically you want something on the front that is 400 Lumen or better. For the rear, I've been buying Cygolite's Hot Shot for years. They've always delivered and I've actually had several riders comment on how visible they make me to traffic.

Not sure if that model Schwinn has braze ons for a rear rack? Would strongly recommend adding one and getting a bag if you do. It's really nice not having the weight on one's back in the wet. Good luck, and welcome to the non-fair weather cycling gang. :D

u/lolliegagger · 6 pointsr/CampingGear

Mountaintop 40 liter pretty good for 40 bucks, however I'm upgrading again soon. This one is great and I've had it for about two years now with no sign of wear and tear but I wish I had gone with a 50 or 60 liter bag as the 40 really strains for space on a week long trip. Its perfect for about three days however and that's usually what I do anyway. here's some pics of mine the thing I was most concerned about was support and this does a decent enough job, I'd say 7/10. It has molded foam support which is good but a external frame style seems better to me ( however that's a opinionated subject ) id reccamend going ahead and getting either this one or a larger Teton, or the larger version of mine if your planning on staying out for more than 5 days or so. Less than that and I'd highly recommend mine :)

u/GermanNewToCA · 2 pointsr/ebikes

For me, this: https://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-PH-1-2-P-Handled-Wrench/dp/B003FPONCI/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1541802830&sr=8-2&keywords=park+tool+allen+key&dpID=419-T8tUMxL&preST=_SY300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch

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I was too stingy to buy good allen keys for a very long time because I had a ton of really cheap ones, and the cheap ones did work. But every time I use the ones above, I think: "These were so worth it". I say that to myself every single time.

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Not a tool, but since someone else mentioned a tire: 200 miles ago I put on some Maxis Hookworms - best commuting tires I ever had. Wow. I had Vee Chinane and then Vee Speedster before - I got flats every other week, none on the hookworms and the hookworms are much more stable on less grippy surfaces either. Every time I reach a place I think: Wow, those are the best tires I ever had.

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Other tools I use constantly:

- my bike repair stand, i use this one: https://www.amazon.com/Bikehand-Mechanic-Bicycle-Repair-Stand/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1541802939&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=bikehand+bike+stand&psc=1

- my chain link tool: https://www.amazon.com/d/Bike-Shop-Tools/Park-Tool-Master-Pliers-MLP-1-2/B00D9NW32I/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1541803019&sr=8-1&keywords=park+tool+chain+link+tool

- A good portable multitool with chainbreaker: https://www.amazon.com/d/Bike-Multifunction-Tools/Topeak-Alien-31-Function-Bicycle-Tool/B000FIE4AE/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1541803074&sr=8-2&keywords=alien+tool

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u/KenBalbari · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

For shelter, you really have a choice, tent, tarp and hammock, or tarp and net tent. If you want to hang around camp, you might want a bigger tent. If you plan to do hiking, many people only use the shelter to sleep in, and go with something small and lightweight, like a small solo tent, or even bivy.

I would point you towards some lightweight hiking gear here. That gives you the option to hike off to primative sites, carrying your shelter and supplies on your back. You don't necessarily need to go to the ultralight extremes that serious distance hikers go though.

You could start with a tent like this or this. If you wanted to get more serious into distance hiking, you would maybe spend more on something even lighter in weight (like maybe 2 lbs).

In Florida, I like the combination of a bug bivy (like this ) and a good tarp (like this). Though you would need poles as well. Hikers tend to use their trekking poles (like these). You would also need paracord (550 cord works well) to pitch a tarp.

For a stove, I mean something like this. Those are inexpensive and work fine.

For clothes, you can probably use mostly things you already own. Avoid cotton and linen. Synthetics like nylon and polyester will dry much more easily and do a better job in the heat and humidity in FL. And if you are going to go out there now, in hunting season, make sure you have some things that are bright orange. The hunters can be more dangerous than the bears.

As for bears, you don't really need any special container. Just learn to hang a stuff sack with any food or toiletries which have any scent. Using an odor barrier bag as a liner isn't a bad idea though. They'll generally leave you alone unless they smell what they think is food (and their sense of smell is very strong).

For shoes, again existing walking shoes are probably fine for now. Especially if you stick to sites off existing hiking trails to start.

For now, I'd start with a less primative site in a campground in someplace like Ocala. You can explore from there (there are sites near to trails), and have an idea next time you go out where you might want to try more primative camping. For now, focus on developing skills like how to use a compass, how to pitch a tent or tart, learning usefull knots for pitching tarps or hangning bear bags, etc.

It probably is a good idea to have a sleeping pad right off. A RidgeRest Classic might do the job for about $20. You can spend more on an inflatable pad if you think you will be more comfortable.

u/SuddenSeasons · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Check out this guy: https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Lynx-1-Person-Tent/dp/B00BMKD1DU/

It's lighter (just under 4 Lb), it's listed as JUST too wide for your bag, but do you think you can squish it in? It's lighter, cheaper, really well reviewed, and a much bigger floor space. Your tent only has 20 sq feet!

Listed as 6"x17.5" so the volume works, may just need some re-configuring? Ditch the stuff sack.

I have a tent which is almost exactly these dimensions and man, I love it. I backpack, so it has room for my sleep pad, stuff next to me (water, phone charger), room for my pack at the end by my feet, and I never ever feel cramped. It sucks to be unconstrained by weight (motorcycle) and still sleeping like you're UL hiking. It's heavy, so it's not my ultra-light setup, but it takes literally 45 seconds to set up camp.

edit: You can get the Static V insulated for cheaper. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Klymit-Insulated-Static-V-Sleeping-Pad-06IVOr01C-/191504068900 $62.76 right from the manufacturer - it's a great pad. I have the regular and the insulated as my only sleep pad (side sleeper, wide dude), just switch out based on weather. You have the best in price/class product there.

edit2: This could be had for $90 if you're an REI member, or can find one who will let you use their coupon. https://www.rei.com/rei-garage/product/110867/kelty-dualist-22-sleeping-bag

This one is 8x13: https://www.amazon.com/Kelty-Tuck-Degree-Sleeping-Bag/dp/B00NFCFIR0/ref=sr_1_14?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1491157929&sr=1-14&keywords=20+degree+sleeping+bag

Can't really speak to any of those specific bags, but if price is a primary concern it looks like you can do all around a little better, especially if that tent can fit. I think youll have a much comfier trip.

u/IPlayTheInBedGame · 5 pointsr/okeechobeemusicfest

Replying to my own comment with some purchasing recommendations:


2. Next level folding chair. The locking feature is sick, most comfortable camp chair I've owned.

My goto folding table. I've got a bigger 8 foot one if I'm camping with a big group but this small one is perfect for 1-4 people.

3. Highly recommend this charger. Will charge a typical iPhone like 5 times and has QC 3.0 built in (quick charge, which is a nice feature at a festival). Currently on sale for $40 if you clip the coupon, I've seen it as low as $30, they'll probably go on sale for black Friday and Christmas too.

5. Bring a box of these babies and if it gets cold, you've suddenly made like 40 friends.

6. Something like this is a good choice for makeup. In case you have to go back to camp and freshen up, the light is a nice touch.

u/aggieotis · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Lots of us commuters use SPD shoes and pedals. You don't have to, but they're pretty nice. The shoes you'll have to check out for yourself as every foot is different, but I would recommend the Shimano M520 as a great and cheap starter pedal.

I'm not a big fan of campus pedals (one side flat, other side clip), but some folks are. If you really want the best of both worlds I think you'll be better off with something like the Shimano M424.

u/IronColumn · 4 pointsr/Hammocks

Woke up to rain, and the gear worked great!

I made sure to tie small drip lines to all of my suspension (including the tarp suspension) and not a drop came in. Even had the tarp relatively high and in porch mode all night (for the view of the moon).

Hammock is just a cheapo Grand Trunk that has served me faithfully for about four years without any trouble. Although I'm deciding that the extra comfort of moving up to an 11 foot hammock will probably be worth it soon.

Eno tree straps

Eno profly tarp

homemade PLUQ worked wonderfully during the ~50 degree non-windy evening.

Jungle blanket: This was my first time using it instead of a bag, and man oh man was it great. Was nice and cozy down to 50 degrees, and I didn't get tangled in it like I do in my sleeping bags. Recommend 100% if you don't want to drop the dough on a down topquilt. Maybe even if you do, since this seems way better in the wet than down would.

River is the Potomac, and I got it all there on my bike. About 40 miles outside of DC

u/projectself · 1 pointr/steak

.. in 2013, a few months after the divorce, about this time of year I bought myself a present that I am still very happy with. Everyone who see's them/uses them comments positively. I went back to my amazon cart and got exact links to the products to make sure I was describing exactly what I got.

I left most of my good kitchen knives behind when we separated, and needed to replace them. as a single guy, I have no use for "pretty" kitchen gadgets and what-nots. I also did not have thousands to spend on the things I needed, but I was adamant I wanted good stuff. Stylish is fine, but functionality trumps all.

on my list was two of these, (knife blocks)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004X6M97O/

8 of these (mora knives.. cheap but awesome)

www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004ZAIXSC

and 8 of these - (kershaw knives - slightly more pricy, but damn good)

www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0009VC9YA

..
Of course, it could easily be halved by only picking one style of knife.. read the product reviews on your own. both of those are fine blades, regardless of pricing/marketing.

Best self gift to myself in years. Use them every day and love them.
oh yeah -- not affiliated with any of the above companies..

u/ohnovangogh · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

My current setup is a BRS stove, a Snow Peak Ti-Mini Solo Combo 2, and a reflectix koozy.

The koozy and stuff sack weigh 47 grams, and the pot, cup, and lid weigh 143 grams. The stove (not counting the canister) weighs 25 grams. Everything fits inside the pot with extra room (I also keep a quarter of a scrubbing pad in there for cleaning).

I haven't gotten a chance to take the Snow Peak out yet, but I've been using the Mini Solo 1 for about 4 years now and love it. My only gripes are with the handle on the lid, and how small the handles on the cup are. Since both of these issues were fixed in the Mini Solo 2 I decided to upgrade. This seems to be idea for two people, as I can easily boil enough water for both of our meals (I use primarily dehydrated meals). My girlfriend doesn't have her own cup, so the past couple of trips I've given her the cup and ate out of the pot. For breakfast we eat first, then rinse the pot and make coffee (she's a slow mover in the morning so we're not in a rush to get moving).

Like I said I'm very happy with this system. While it could be lighter, I don't think its combined weight is unreasonable. I've been interested in giving an alcohol stove a go too, but I can never seem to get my fancee feast stove to work (the wick never seems to light).

Hope this helps!

u/Woltz_Sandage · 6 pointsr/Bushcraft

So for shelter, I'd suggest this tarp. I also suggest checking out the forum that the tarp is from (www.bushcraftusa.com) because it's a forum all about bushcraft but has sub forums in ultralight and backpacking. The tarp is https://bushcraftoutfitters.com/coyote-tarp-10x10/ which is priced at $67. The reason I suggest this is because this tarp specifically, there's lots of way's to set it up. Check out this video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxtHJm51NPY&t=


So for cooking, it's pretty simple. This video will show you what most bushcrafters use and the links that follow are the two items. I use it myself and in fact have two sets because of how much I enjoy it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00gwQ4z_nQQ&t and the following links for the items. https://www.walmart.com/search/?query=Ozark%20Trail%2018-Ounce%20Stainless%20Steel%20Cup
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Stanley-Adventure-Camp-Cook-Set/16784406
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Ozark-Trail-9-5-Round-Frying-Pan/49332895


Hammocks are over rated, sleeping pads are a mess to figure out, get a cot. In fact, get this cot. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Outdoor-Super-Ultralight-Portable-Folding-Aluminium-alloy-Cot-Camping-Tent-Bed/112355265955?hash=item1a28e54da3:g:-PUAAOSwTM5Y365i:rk:2:pf:0


And now you need a knife, saw, and hatchet right? Well let's tackle all three.
https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-4-1-Inch-Military/dp/B004ZAIXSC?ref_=w_bl_hsx_s_sp_web_6501052011
https://www.amazon.com/Bahco-396-LAP-Laplander-Folding-Inch/dp/B0001IX7OW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1540606867&sr=8-1&keywords=Bacho+Laplander
https://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-X7-Hatchet-Inch-378501-1002/dp/B0002YTO7E/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1540607032&sr=8-2&keywords=Fiskars+X7+Hatchet+14+Inch%2C+378501-1002
And as a added bonus here's a fire steel.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/4-x-2-5-Drilled-Ferrocerium-Ferro-Rod-Steel-Flint-Fire-Starter-w-Lanyard-Hole/131485475489?hash=item1e9d2522a1:rk:4:pf:0


And finally to end it all, we have a sleeping bag. This one is well known in the world. Kelty Cosmic 20 Degree. It's a dry down bag which means it's made of down that can handle some moisture but still keep you warm. It's rated for 20 degree's. I'll post the same bag as well but is rated for 0 degrees'. It'll be more expensive but it'll let you stay warm during the winter.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Kelty-Cosmic-20-Sleeping-Bag-20-Degree-Down/253894865275?epid=1152349824&hash=item3b1d50317b:m:mFpUvLXnvtZZETXdugDHwvw:rk:2:pf:0

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Kelty-Cosmic-0-Sleeping-Bag-0-Degree-Down/253375355468?epid=28012067594&hash=item3afe591a4c:m:mCrEnOYV72CJ257e08pGR4Q:rk:2:pf:0


Check the sizes of the sleeping bag before you buy.


Also a pack, this one works as two in one. Really nice for a 60L https://outdoorvitals.com/products/rhyolite-60l-lightweight-internal-frame-backpack1
________________________________________

If you do plan on doing any winter camping, I'd edit a few things. One of them is I'd get the 0 Degree sleeping bag posted. Instead of the tarp I'd get this pup tent. https://www.ebay.com/itm/USGI-Military-Issue-2-Man-Canvas-PUP-TENT-w-Poles-Stakes-Complete-VGC/392111853275?hash=item5b4bb00edb:g:JEQAAOSw~jJarA5E:rk:1:pf:0 Which comes with poles and stakes. I normally toss the poles and get some branches outside. I get four branches and make a bipod that I tie off on either end. That gives me more room inside the tent and less weight I have to carry on my person.


I'd still get the cot but I'd also include Thermarest Z-Lite sleeping pad to put on top of it https://www.ebay.com/itm/Therm-a-Rest-Z-Lite-Sol-Ultralight-Foam-Backpacking-Mattress/132801349129?epid=1900010560&hash=item1eeb93c609:rk:1:pf:0 as well as one of those super heavy duty emergency blankets. It's a reflective blanket but it's also the same thickness as some of those heat reflectors you use for a car windshield. Not those flimsy things you see "survivalists" use. Those placed on the cot, with that zero degree bag, and that shelter works amazingly. Just don't throw a heavy blanket on the sleeping bag and don't wear a lot of clothes in it either. That'll make everything for naught.
______________________________________
So with everything listed, the pack, cooking stuff, tools, cot, sleeping bag, and either the canvas shelter or tap, you'd be looking at around $560 assuming you got the 0 Degree Sleeping Bag instead of the 20 Degree. Which you really should. A 0 Degree is much better in my case.


Also if you do get a down sleeping bag, NEVER STORE IT IN THE COMPRESSED STATE!!! Always store it someplace with it out of it's bag. If you keep it compressed 24/7 until you use it, you'll destroy the down.

u/hidperf · 1 pointr/bikecommuting

The bike started life as a 2012 Motobecane Fantom Cross Pro, which came with some good components already. SRAM Rival partial group,
FSA crankset, and Mavic Aksium Race wheels. I've had good luck with this bike and it's got almost 2k miles on it, so I kept most of it, but not all.

Once I decided to make it my commuter bike, I started adding things.

For lights I picked up the Cygolite Hot shot rear light and use one of my MTB lights if needed for the front, a
Chinese knock-off CREE XM-L2 front light

For tires I went with the Panaracer RiBMo 700x32c based on feedback from users on here.

You can't go wrong with a Tubus Logo Evo Rear Rack and Ortlieb Back Roller Classics.


I wanted some extra gearing for those climbs along the way, so I went with the SRAM FORCE Rear Derailleur so I could run a SRAM PG-1050 11-32 Cassette.

Of course, I needed a new KMC X10SL chain for the new gear combo.

I picked up a new road bike and pulled the Ritchey Pro Streem Saddle and Ritchey Pro Biomax bars off of that bike and used them on my commuter, along with some new Lizard Skins DSP 3.2mm bar tape and some Soma Road Flares for added visibility.

For a little less weight and possible shock absorbtion, I threw in a Chinese knock off carbon seat post.

I also wanted something besides my regular riding shoes, so I opted for the Shimano Click'R PD-T700 pedals and
Shimano SH-CT40 Cycling Shoes
, which I love and highly recommend.

I also needed to adjust the fit so I picked up a Kalloy Uno 6 90mm stem because I've had great luck with them on other bikes.

And for added safety, I picked up two rolls of 3M Scotchcal Reflective Striping Tape in white and black, and added white stripes to the white frame and black stripes to the rims and the back of my helmet.

u/alaskaj1 · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

Those are the poles, I actually edited my reply, perhaps while you were typing out yours.

I cant really say anything about the tent, you will have to trust the reviews. It still looks a bit heavy at almost 7lbs but with your budget I am not sure how much better you can do. You would need to bump up to probably close to $200 just for the tent. (For example: my wife and I took the marmot limelight 3 person tent out and it weighs in at just under 7lbs, I still felt it was really heavy splitting the cost.)

That sleeping bag has actually been debated recently. For the price it is hard to believe the claimed rating, there are concerns that it wont be warm enough. If you do go with that one you might want to try it out somewhere close to home/car first if you can.

I don't have a lot of experience with specific sleeping pads but the klymit static V insulated is a pretty popular budget option and has a 4.4 r value. It is currently $55. Its comfortable enough , my wife used that one when we went out.

If you happen to be near an REI check and see if they are having a members garage sale on December 1st, many locations are. They can have some huge discounts on gear, you just have to be careful before you buy as there are no returns. I got a 3.4lb 2 person tent for 60% off and the REI magma 10 sleeping bag for 50% off. The prices might be a little more than your current budget but you can really find some awesome prices on quality gear. If you aren't already a member it will be $20 to join (lifetime membership).

u/CodySpring · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Since I'm new at this (I have however been camping in wilderness multiple times for 3-5 days, just never backpacking) I've been reading a ton of guides. I don't have a huge budget since this is something I'm just getting into, but looking around at different reviews this seems to be the best stuff I can get within my price range. If anyone cares to take a look and possibly give any suggestions I would appreciate it.

  • Tent - I wanted a two person because the weight difference between this and similar-priced one person tents didn't seem large enough, and more importantly I plan on backpacking with SO or my sister, so the split weight from only having one person carrying a tent seems better.


  • Backpack - Once again, budget, but seems to be exactly what I need.


  • Sleeping Bag - I'm in Louisiana, so nearby backpacking spots such as Texas don't warrant me buying a super low F rated sleeping bag. I don't want to be burning up and I figure once I get to the point where I'm hiking in colder weather I won't mind dropping more cash on a better rated sleeping bag.
u/vibeee · 1 pointr/coloradohikers

Thank you so much. Thank you taking your time to explain it to me.

I have this Sawyer. I think we might have drank some water from one of the lakes in Titans but we survived that without getting sick. We also mostly boiled it as it was really cold outside(October).

I'm definitely going to get the tablets for treating. It sounds it's good to have them in your pack.

Lastly, which USGS maps do you use? I just went to their website and I am kinda lost. I have been buying the National Geographic maps where ever I go. Are those good enough? Would they show mining sites?

Thanks again. I really appreciate you typing all of this. It's super helpful.

u/BraveLilToaster42 · 5 pointsr/JustNoSO

You got this. Start sneaking the things that matter to you into the truck you want to take so long as your wife won't notice (i.e. put the tarot deck you like in the glove box). It's not much but it will feel like something.

One trick I've heard from people who voluntarily lived in their cars was that they joined a cheap 24 hour gym so they could shower. When you're ready to leave, check Good Will for secondhand camp gear if you need it. If you want to splurge, this is the one I used at a music festival. It was great.

If you feel like putting down roots on the east coast and need a safe place to park, give me a buzz.

u/Kromulent · 6 pointsr/knives

It depends entirely on what you expect to do with the knife.

Food prep is a common task, which is best done with a small, slender fixed blade knife (folding knives are harder to keep clean - very important with food prep! - and slender blades cut food better than thick blades do). If the food prep knife is carried with the cooking gear, it does not require a belt sheath. A $9 victorinox paring knife is light and strong and would work fine for all but the largest jobs.

A saw or hatchet is far superior to a knife for preparing firewood, if that's going to be necessary.

General woodworking tasks - such as forming tent stakes, or notching wood to build a shelter or something like that - is best done with a thicker, stronger knife. A $20 stainless mora is very hard to beat for these sorts of tasks. If the hatchet/saw are lost, they can help with firewood prep, too.

See /r/Bushcraft for lots of helpful advice and knowledge.

u/Gullex · 3 pointsr/Survival

$150 is plenty of budget for a good knife. This one is just slightly over that budget but will last you the rest of your life. It's kind of my dream survival knife.

The Fallkniven F1 is very popular as well and right in your price range.

Currently I use this knife which is also very good.

If you want to go a little less expensive still, Becker makes some good ones such as the Bk16. I know the Becker doesn't look anything like "hand made", but I have the BK2- I used paint remover to take the black coating off the blade, replaced the plastic handles with micarta and stained it to look more like wood, and built a leather sheath for it. It's a beautiful knife now. Too bad it's so goddamn heavy.

You could also go with something like the Mora bushcraft. I have that one also, very decent knife.

You could even just get a regular Mora or a Condor bushlore which are even more economical options.

u/gandothesly · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

I'll have to disagree here. The Mora Bushcraft Triflex is one of the finest blades I've used. It is light weight, yet, is extremely durable. It sharpens easily, holds and edge, and is about the right size for bushcraft in my hands.

I've used them to prep meat and vegetables, carve wood needles, baton firewood, cut cordage, fell tiny trees, and most other tasks one needs in the woods or at home. It is a joy to use.

I've used other brands at 20 times the price and have been left not nearly as satisfied.

Don't take for granted that you won't feel bad about really using this blade. At less than $30 you won't worry about replacing it (but you might never need to).

I've held and used the Mora Companion and the Mora HighQ Robust, I give them to folks that go into the woods with me as gifts. They are fine knives as well, with the same qualities as the Triflex.

If you are cheapo, grab one of these knives and try it. I'd bet most people like them.

As for the knife is not an axe part, we'll disagree there too. The Parang type machete, and other long knives of similar design is a type of tool used in many parts of the world. It can be used very skillfully for rather delicate tasks, such as food preparation, or it can be used to cut down a tree. In some areas that's all a person carries.

Firesteel, I'm with stupid_guy, hit Amazon: Light My Fire Scout has been working for me. I like that when it feels like you are holding it right, you are. Works good in the dark that way.

Guyot Stainless Steel Bottle, 32-Ounce

And one more thing you didn't ask for, but I love. And I like to spread the love:

GSI Halulite Ketalist

I've got a compass that I've used for 30 some years, but can't find it anywhere.

Let us know what you get and how much you like it after using it a bit! :-)


u/matthewrozon · 1 pointr/backpacking

You do not have to spend a lot. Here are some suggestions that I choose to use even though I could spend the money on more expensive gear.

Pack: Rent until you decide you want to do this a lot and have already bought the rest of your gear

Tent: rent it for this trip if you don't already have one. If you do, it's best to split it up, poles and fly for you and tent for him or vice versa

Sleeping bags, bring them if you have them or rent

Stove: http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Ignition-silvery/dp/B00ENDRORM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396264963&sr=8-1&keywords=backpacking+stove Works just as well as the 50$ one.

Water filter: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396265006&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini+water+filter cheap, durable, no moving parts to worry about and it's super light

Pot: A lot of people use this, but it might be a bit small for you depending on what kind of food you're going to cook but this works well for freezer bag meals http://www.amazon.com/Stanco-Non-Stick-Grease-Strainer-Black/dp/B000MVTIOQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396265044&sr=8-1&keywords=grease+can

Long Johns and other clothing: Walmart usually has decent options. Make sure that they are synthetic. You may find that you already have a few things if you look through your clothes at home. Depending how thick they are your snowboarding socks might make good hiking socks or if you have long underwear for snowboarding they would be useful camping.

What are you doing for shoes? Do not waste money on boots if you don't already have them. 90% of trails can be done in good running shoes and 95% of trails can be done in light hiking shoes.

Misc hints: For water bottles just re-use old gatorade bottles, those nalgenes are super heavy. Think about getting two hiking poles instead of just walking stick but this is a preference thing. Avoid cotton at all costs and have fun!

u/Prosapiens · 4 pointsr/EDC

Gorruck 34L GR2 Coyote Tan - a good bag, heavy, uncomfortable, probably give it to my grandchildren in like 50 years

Flip Flops - generic things

Bigblue 28W solar charger - very good, can charge my battery up during the day if i leave it in the sun which I've never really done honestly

Jakemy hardware tools - seamed useful? i've never needed this

Army glove shells - i thought i used these a lot and were indistructable but now that i think of it, i don't use them that often and are probably pretty cheaply made.

Sharpie, pen, all weather notebook - probably should switch over to a fisher space pen...

Straws - these are probably already broken.

Whistle - really really really loud

Fire-striker, matches, lighter - i'm not sure i have enough ways to start a fire

Fresnel lens - ok, now i have enough

LED flashlight - i used to go running in the middle of the night with this flashlight, its tiny

LED flashlight - this isn't the one i have but looks kinda similar? i don't remember where i got mine

Earbuds - generic cheap earbuds

Leatherman Surge - given to me by my wife for passing the bar. thanks wife!

First Aide kit - i put mine together from stuff i've stolen from friends houses whenever i go over and use the bathroom

playing cards - these look very similar to the ones i have, they are plastic so they won't get rained on

glasses/ sunglasses - i have really bad vision

personal hygiene kit - aahhhh dry shaving

Sawyer Mini / syringe, collapsible canteen (dirty), heavy duty straw - i've never used this

collapsible canteen (clean) - i've never used this either

sewing kit - i've used this a lot

ID tags - i guess if i get blown up they'll know my blood type?

garbage bag - for when my pockets are full

elastic bands - i use these when packing to keep rolled socks and things from falling apart

Salt - i have nooooo idea why i have this

cooking grate - i'm not going to hold meat over a fire with a stick like some sort of caveman

heavy duty ziplock bag - in case my mapcase breaks and other reasons

rip-patch - leftover from when i needed a pack because i bought a crummy cheap inflatable sleeping pad.

Army Fleece Beanie - i always keep this at the top of my pack

4 Bungie Cords - not the one i use but similar. to make a field-expedient shelter

Trowel - for disposal of biological wastes

Lensatic compass - because GPS should only be a backup

Pocketboy 130 folding saw - i have a bigger one for yardwork, this small one is really great

Tent stakes - for tent staking

Ravpower 26800 Battery - use this all the time can fast chage my stuff

Battery Battery holder, cables, wall charger - all fits togehter like glove!

Army Poncho - wear it, make a tent out of it etc

Microfiber towel - not the one i use but similar. i mainly use this for when the kids accidentally fall in a lake like they tend to do for some reason

Down Jacket - cheap chinese knockoff... i feel bad for not buying american

Wet weather top - not sure this is worth the space/weight

Wet Weather bottom - not sure if this is worth the weight/space

Silkweights - PJs! and warmth

Jungle Blanket - this is a lot better than the army's woobie. lighter and warmer

Gransfors Bruks Wildlife Hatchet - again, gift from wife. she wanted me to chop things and be more manly, generally. now i come home with parts of wildlife for her to cook

Map of New England - or, how i stopped worrying and love dismounted land navigation

PT belt - keeps me safe in all situations

Compression straps - i don't like lashing things to the outside but i guess i can if i wanted to

Fork and Spoon - stole these from the kitchen. i'll probably be replacing this soon with something titanium.

​

EDIT: i just priced it out: $1,585.08 total

u/authro · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

We actually went in late March, but Utah had a much colder winter/early spring last year. It got to the upper thirties overnight, and all three hammockers used sleeping bags and inflatable pads for warmth. I personally used a 0-degree Teton Leef bag and insulated Klymit Static V, and slept in thermals, fleece, down vest, and a beanie. I like to sleep warm, haha.

I'm confident enough about the trees that if I had a permit for #5 right now, going just off what I remember, I'd bring a hammock and maybe a bivy sack just in case. I'm like 90% sure it'd be fine. The campsites are beaten down enough that going to ground wouldn't be super difficult anyway. Note, though, that the trees in #4 are pretty low and bendy, so don't be surprised if you wake up on the ground anyway.

BTW I found a blog of someone that camped at #5 but the only picture that says it was taken from the campsite was this one.

edit: you HAVE to go see Kolob Arch; it's amazing.

u/Smaskifa · 2 pointsr/bikecommuting

Disc racks can work on non-disc brake wheels. I use a Blackburn EX-1 Disc Rack on my bike. My bike does not have the eyelets by the wheel hub for pannier racks, but strangely it does have the eyelets on the seat stay for them. I found this rack works very well on my bike.

For USB rechargeable lights, I use a Cygolite Metro 500 and a Cygolite Hotshot. Both lights are easily removable so you can take them with you when you leave your bike locked up. There are cheaper versions of the Cygolite Metro which are also quite good (300, 360, 400), but not quite as bright. The Metro 300 is probably enough light for most people, and is what I used first. The only reason I switched is because my girlfriend's bike needed a better headlight, so I used that as an excuse to upgrade mine and give her my old one. Currently the 360 is cheaper than the 300 on Amazon, and is brighter. So there's no reason to get the 300 right now.

For multi tool, I like the Topeak Hexus II. Someone else on Reddit recommended it to me months ago and I'm quite satisfied.

For a full time commuter, I recommend some puncture resistant tires. I use Continental Gatorskins with Mr Tuffy liners inside them. Haven't had a single flat in several months now. Having a flat on your way to work would really suck, especially in crappy winter weather.

I use Ortlieb Front Rollers on my rear rack, as I was worried the Back Rollers would be large enough to cause heel strike. The Front Rollers are very nice. I love how easy they are to put on and take off, plus they're quite rugged and keep everything dry. The Front Rollers are just barely large enough for a 15" laptop, though I can't roll the top down well with it in there.

u/JumpyCattle · 1 pointr/longboarding

Hey all, newbie here! I've been trying to learn how to pivot for a month or so I would say, and I don't think I've gotten anywhere.

​

I feel like part of the problem might be my board. I'm not trying to blame my materials instead of my obvious deficiency of course, but I can't help thinking about it. Currently I have the Quest Super Cruiser. It weighs 10 lbs and the wheels have a durometer of 80A.

I have a really old, crappy skateboard that I can do a pivot on with relative ease, which I guess isn't surprising as it's much shorter and lighter. But I also tried my friend's board briefly the other day and I felt like it was much easier to pivot (still couldn't manage it all the way). Her wheels were definitely harder (85A).

​

I looked up lists of longboards other people recommend for freestyle, and they were all around 7 and a half pounds, except they had a tad softer wheels. I'm pretty confused at this point.

​

I looked at a YouTuber I watch's set up video, and I think I know now that I want 85A wheels. Would this solve the problem though? I'm also aware that the pintail-ish shape isn't ideal for this style, but I hadn't done enough research when I first bought it. So would getting a different shape help too? Would it be worth it?

​

So, what's the main issue here? The wheels, the shape, the weight, all of the above, something I'm overlooking, or just not enough practice?

Edit: Thanks everyone! I managed to get it down :-)

u/spasticpoodle · -1 pointsr/nononono

The person overtaking is responsible for overtaking safely.

I ride on multi use trails, as well as in traffic. Every time, and I mean EVERY time I pass someone, be it on a bike, roller blades, or walking, they get a "DING" from my bell, or if they are wearing earphones, a friendly but firm "On your left!"

When I'm on the road, however, I use my air horn... Yes, I have an air horn on my bike. Best thing EVER! You use your bike pump to pressurize a bottle that sits in one of your water bottle cages, and there is a small tube that runs up to the actual horn on the bars. You press a button, and an ear piercing shriek comes out of the horn. One pressurization of the tank will be good for a good 30 second long blast, but many many more "normal" length toots.

This is similar to what I have. It even has a volume control of sorts. (It's a valve that limits the amount of air admitted to the horn, so you can mash the button, but it won't be ear splittingly loud, in case you want to use it to give people friendly "toot toots" on the trail.

u/cupcakegiraffe · 2 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

For quasi-anonymity, would it be possible to not state where I go to school?

If so, I'm on my second year as a transfer student in animal science. I love animals and I love caring for and spending time with them, so this degree will allow me to be paid for doing what I love. Some possible career options would allow me to be able to work with animals and people, helping them to have a mutually beneficial relationship.

I walk every day to school because my bike lock rusted out and I don't trust that my lockless bike on campus would be there when I returned. I would enter for a lock for my bike so I can have either a few more minutes of study or sleep, depending on the day. Thank you for the contest. =)

u/benh509 · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

Great, super light, can hold in hand for better trail illumination or clip on to a hat for hands free.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LUO028U/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_b2l2Cb31GDXSB

Awesome headlamp. Super light, lots of levels and a red light and lockable. Get it from Litesmith.com with the shock cord band for an even lighter option.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077Z3LNX9/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_Q3l2CbTEV8FDE

I have both and love both.

u/tesla_100 · 3 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

I'd recommend a light weight small 1 person tent. The lighter the better. Some people get larger tents to fit there stuff waste of weight in my opinion.

Next comes your budget, you can spend a lot of money on a tent. Just like buying a car you can get a 1990 Honda or a new Ferrari.

If your on a budget I hiked the PCT with this tent:

Alps mountaineering Lynx 1-person tent. Used ones going for $78. 3.8 pounds. Held up does the job. https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Lynx-1-Person-Tent/dp/B00BMKD1DU/ref=sxin_7_af-pna-1_c600956ebde1baf8592371faedf0cf781eb071ae?keywords=tent&pd_rd_i=B00BMKD1DU&pd_rd_r=33b407bc-ebcb-4ba9-818d-a3a3e7db6d0d&pd_rd_w=e3KvM&pd_rd_wg=Zf92I&pf_rd_p=3892bc23-5fa8-4a18-8855-22c23bd2e202&pf_rd_r=4P2HDHKKN7KQE3CPKBGR&qid=1573250503

If you got a little extra money, you get what you pay for. These tents are lighter and some of them are lighter and a little bigger. You are fighting between size and weight. Some tents are bigger but weigh more, some weigh less but are too small for some people. This is a preference and only you can pick the right answer. Everyone has a different opinion. Here are some awesome tents Ive seen hiking:

Big agnes copper spur

https://www.backcountry.com/big-agnes-copper-spur-ul1-ultralight-tent-1-person-3-season?skid=BAG00B3-GRA-ONESIZ&ti=UExQIEJyYW5kOkJpZyBBZ25lcyBUZW50cyAmIFNoZWx0ZXJzOjE6MTM6MTAwMDAwMDEyX2JjLXRlbnRzLXNoZWx0ZXJz

NEmo Hornet (My personal favorite. )

https://www.nemoequipment.com/product/hornet/

MSR Elixer

https://www.moosejaw.com/product/msr-elixir-1-tent_10368196?hybridPLA=true&ad_id=GooglePlusBox&utm_source=GooglePlusBox&utm_medium=PLA&utm_campaign=MSR&scid=scplp4197589&sc_intid=4197589&adpos=1o1&cm_mmc=PLA-_-Google-_-SC_Shopping_NoPromo_Brand_Desktop|SC_Shopping_NoPromo_Brand_Desktop-_-google|762455646|39930674093|182268966899|aud-223426839163:pla-840516347932|c|9016466|4197589&gclid=CjwKCAiAwZTuBRAYEiwAcr67OVfNzVg9Dx6vr7IfpqP6uLZJNCL0nIHtVHhK7KeYErN6jYeBIASwnRoCCJcQAvD_BwE

These style tents are very light but are very expensive. They are also a pain to set up and break easily. As a begginer id stay away. They are for rich people who backpack all the time.

https://zpacks.com/products/duplex-tent?variant=9365267316772

Hyperlite has a similar style for a stupid

You can also use a tarp, or a hammock. I stay away im a tent person.

A lot of backpacking is what you like! Its personable, if you go with any of the middle tents you cant go wrong! Just recomend finding a light one person tent! let me know if you need help choosing a style! Happy trails!!

u/benben555 · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I have a set of Shimano PD-A530 on my Salsa Vaya that I use daily for commuting (platform) and longer rides on the weekend (SPD).

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376967521&sr=8-1&keywords=shimano+pd-a530

I really like them, they have not failed me after 2000 miles and are a solid feeling pedal. Even though they do not have the more 'spikey' surface on the platform side I have yet to have my feet slide off even in the wet. It may be a smidge out of your price range, but honestly it was for me as well, but I do not regret it one bit!

The big thing to keep in mind with dual pedals is will you be able to easily flip them to the side you need. With the A530s the SPD side is always on top in it's equilibrium position which means I don't have to look down to find the side I want. I just reach for the pedal with my foot and either clip in, or flip the back of it forward to get to the platform side.

Personally I think the design of the pedals you are looking at would make it really hard to determine which side of the pedal you are on. But, just like everything if you get used to it I'm sure it will work great. It all comes down to personal preference I guess!

u/bluesatin · 1 pointr/bicycling

After quite a lot of research, I've taken the plunge on buying a road bike for general use after not riding a bike in like a decade... Decided to splurge on a B'Twin Triban 500SE (shop link that'll probably inevitably break), rather than deal with the hassle of trying to find a second hand bike locally and deal with potential repairs etc. And of course for my own personal vanity of liking minimalist designs, the bike's look is perfect for me, I'm not the biggest fan of the more traditionally bright decals etc.

It'll be the first nice bike I've had as well, I had a massive mountain bike thing when I was a teenager but never used it off-road, considering I'm a slender fellow it weighed a tonne and wasn't much fun to use. It'll be interesting to see what a light road bike will be like. Can't wait for it to arrive! :D

I've been trying to make sure I don't forget any of the essential accessories I'll be needing. So far I've ordered these:

  • Multi-tool
  • Puncture Repair Kit
  • Mini-pump
  • D-Lock with a cable loop
  • Helmet

    Things I need to look at:

  • Lights Bought a NiteRider Solas and Lezyne Super Drive XL for lights.
  • Oil
  • Cover (since there's barely any room in my flat, might have to sort something out if I'm not using the bike often in Winter or something).

    Is there any other essentials I'm missing? I imagine there might be a lot of tiny things that I'm missing, stuff like reflectors.

    Also recommendations for the stuff I'm missing will be appreciated, I just bought some good rated stuff off Amazon, no idea if the reviews are completely wrong, I know they can be for some products I'm more versed in.

    Also any tips for someone's first ride in a while, and especially first time on drop handles? I've done some basic research on how to hold the bars and use the Microshift gear levers, but I'm sure there's little tips that might help.
u/minusfive · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

TarpTent and Six Moon Designs are the 2 that come to mind. You should shoot them an email with your questions, they may even provide special pricing for scout troops (some cottage manufacturers do). The SMD Lunar Duo Outfitter is comparable in size to many 3 person tents, but marketed as a 2 person because they're generous with space, and usually goes for ~$125 during their holiday sale (which should be coming up soon—I got 2 as gifts last year). They're made in the U.S. and have great reputation.

That should leave you enough money left to get a pair (or 3!) of Cascade Mountain Tech Quick Lock Trekking poles, or one of the Al or CF tent poles SMD sells (I'd get trekking poles since they're stronger and serve double duty. The recommended ones have been thoroughly reviewed and are currently considered the best bang for your buck).

u/0x18 · 7 pointsr/CampingGear

Snowboard clothing is overkill unless you plan on staying through a winter storm. Just remember: cotton kills and wool is your friend. If nothing else get yourself a pack of wool socks and some wool underwear and then wear your normal clothes over those. The coldest I've seen Yosemite get to (in the last ~7 years of visiting every winter) was about 30F in the day and ~0-10F at night (really easy to manage). A good wool hat also helps for staying warm at night.

I'm jealous; I just moved from SLO to Oregon and won't be able to do my normal yearly winter Yosemite trip :( I'll miss wandering around in a kilt and tshirt when it's 30F and making everybody think I'm insane, but I can give some misc advice on Yosemite winter camping:

  • Bring snow chains appropriate for your car. Even if the road is clear up into the park it's not guaranteed to be de-iced the entire stretch into the valley, and for most of winter the park rangers will deny you entry if you say you don't have chains even if the road is clear. There's stores not far out of the park that sell them but they're far more expensive than your local car parts store.
  • Use the bear boxes for all food, deodorant, hair spray, tooth paste, and anything with a scent you could imagine a pet animal trying to consume against all logic because the bears, coyotes, and racoons will try and are much larger and smarter (and I have watched them all try).
  • Last time I was there sleeping in your vehicle was verboten. I'm not sure on the exact reason why, but I think it's because bears are known to break into (and ruin in the process) cars while looking for food. You're safer outside the car than in it.
  • Good sleeping bags are great but don't forget to put an insulating layer between yourself and the ground. Air mattresses are okay but suck for temperature control; one of those thin roll-out insulating pads are seemingly worthless but great for staying warm through the night.
  • For $25 you can get 40 chemical handwarmers -- activate two or three (or four if you're cold) at night and toss them into the bottom of your sleeping bag to stay warm at night. Wear a shirt with chest pockets and put another two there, then get a wool beanie and slip another one between it and your head (if there's a blizzard...)
  • Don't go to bed wearing wet (including sweat) clothes! It will cool through the night and wisk away your body heat. Before going to bed change into a fresh suit of dry clothing.
u/SkinII · 2 pointsr/cycling

They're expensive but I absolutely love my Lake winter boots. Got them used on eBay about 5 years ago for $180 in excellent condition. For gloves I use Pearl Izumi lobster gloves.

I've always had cold hands and feet and sometimes even the above isn't enough. When it's really cold I put Hot Hand hand warmers in my gloves, against the palm/base of fingers, and in my boots on top of my toes. They are very toasty.

Tip: The Hot Hands last quite a while and are still useable after a ride. They heat up with air contact so when I finish my ride I put the Hot Hands in a plastic bag and squeeze out as much air as possible. They can't stay in the bag forever but will stay in limbo for a few days. I've used one pair on three different rides. Another trick is that they get hotter the more you shake the package so the first time I only shake it a bit. That way I can be sure they'll be good for another ride.

u/xxxm310ion · 2 pointsr/bugout

So I want to think you’re going for “grey man” due to your backpack, but carrying around an AK might make you stand out a bit. You could try storing your rifle in one of those bags that come with folding chairs. It would help a little at least.

You have a lot of heavy stuff like people have already said. That backpack won’t hold up to much weight over distance. You shouldn’t ever cheap out on the one thing that holds all of your gear. I understand backpacks can get quite expensive, but it really is a must.

You should pack more cordage. That can be used for a million things.

Get you a smaller bottle of water and a water filter. (Sawyer Mini )

I’m sure everyone is talking about weight, so I won’t say much about that other than cans, pots, and pans are heavy.

I’d like to see what changes you make, so feel free to post again once you have updated it a bit! Good luck! Welcome to the club!

u/SilverSeven · 2 pointsr/ottawa

Just an FYI, I spend a LOT of time in the woods and put a lot of research into which leatherman to buy. Im so very happy I let a guy at Le Baron talk me into buying the Victorinox SwissTool RS. Its locking mechanism is way better IMO, the selection of tools is a little better, its got a much higher quality feel...all around just a way better product.

Does he spend time in the backcountry? Id highly recommend a Sawyer Mini. Pretty much the best filter you can buy. Can throw it right in line on a camel pack too. Super cool.

u/doitskippy · 2 pointsr/motocamping

That you're camping in Australia reminded me of this recent post in which a blogger recommends this biker-focused swag tent. Seems to be a fair deal and while I have no experience with it the blogger reckons it's a good bit of kit as you Aussies might say ;-). Most likely you won't be borrowing your parent's tent. The car-camping type tents don't really get along well with motocamping. Sleeping bags and maybe the air mattress or sleeping pad are more likely, or a bit of cooking equipment. I'll throw out some random recommendations based on stuff I like and let you decide how it fits into your $500 =).

I find backpacking equipment seems to parallel motocamping equipment in many respects. You aren't as concerned about weight on the motorcycle, but you do need compact and reliable. You may want to consider a backpacker's inflatable sleeping pad, [this is the one I have] (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00ANRW7DI/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1). It's no mattress but it insulates you from the ground which helps keep heat in, and it provides a bit of cushion too. It will fit inside the swag, a hammock, or any compact backpacking tent, and it packs up small. I have this tent which legitimately sleeps two as long as you don't mind being close (tested with my girlfriend) and should fit a twin sized inflatable mattress which would be substantially more comfortable than the camping pad I linked above. To make an addition to your luggage, I can't recommend a tank bag enough. I have this tank bag which is truly a bargain and should fit any motorcycle.

I would also check out Aerostich's Camping Section for some ideas. Being that you're in Australia I'm not sure if you want to buy directly from them unless you can't find an item anywhere but their website, but there are tons of ideas you can get from their store that you might not find other places.

Now I'll just list off several items I can think of that I like to pack for motocamping (most are small and multi-functional items, and a few specific get-my-ass-out-of-a-jam things):

Tire plug kit, some way to put air back in the tire (compact air compressor, CO2 cartridges, bicycle pump, etc), several feet of 550 cord (AKA paracord), extra bungee cords, extra cargo net, zip ties, electrician's tape, heavy-duty trash bags (maybe 3 or 5), a small supplement to my bike's OEM tool kit & a multitool, a first aid kit that includes bug bite relief (and anything else you might want specific to the area you're traveling), a sam splint & triangle bandage, a couple ways to start a fire (waterproof matches stored in a watertight container & a cigarette lighter usually), one or two of those mylar emergency blankets, a little mild dish soap.

You might not feel the need to carry all that on a 3 day trip but a lot of it is small, cheap, and multi-funcitonal. Trash bags are to keep trash under control at camp and emergency waterproofing for gear/people, so you want the thick ones.

u/chrono13 · 2 pointsr/Survival

Sawyer mini for $19: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

Anyone looking at Lifestraw should look at the Sawyer as a (better) alternative.

Lifestraw:

264 gallons total filtration per straw.
Shelf Life: 5 years when stored at room temperature (package may say 3 years).
.2 micron filtration

Sawyer filter:

100,000 gallons (actually more, but this is the guarantee)
Shelf life: no limit on shelf life. Only temperature constraint is it should not be allowed to freeze.
.1 micron filtration

Lifestraw is $20. Sawyer is $20. I own the Sawyer and the flow through it is easy. It comes with a squeeze bag, but also attaches to regular bottles. Fill an empty Pepsi/Coke/Water bottle with nasty water, screw on the Sawyer and you are good to go. It works with Platypus bags, and as an inline or end filter for any hydration bladder.

If there is something special about the Lifestraw that I am missing, please let me know. I see tons of news, charaties buying them for 3rd world countries, and outdoor enthusiast recommending it. I do not see any advantage it has over a Sawyer filter.

Edit: One comparison: http://prepforshtf.com/sawyer-mini-water-filter-vs-lifestraw/

For me, the multiple ways of using the Sawyer have been the biggest benefit. I've used my Squeeze in a bucket gravity system, attached to bottles (ultralight backpacking) and with a straw (like a Lifestraw). I will often squeeze enough water to fill a Gatorade bottle or two before moving away from the water source. Now I have the mini and the flow rate is even better - best of any filter I've ever used, and it is still incredibly versatile. I have bought one for every person in my camping / hiking group to replace their filters. They use and love them too.

u/CopyrightedThought · 1 pointr/Watches

So do you want a diver or a business casual dress watch? The two watches you posted are VERY different in terms of where they work. Regardless, I would shy away from the Invicta. Here
is a higher quality diver, the Orient Mako, that is virtually the same. Same dimensions and everything.

It's hard to tell by your post but it seems you want this for the purpose of being able to dress it up more than dress it down. If you are willing to save another hundred dollars I think you could do well with the Hamilton Khaki Field. Can be either dressed up or down quite easily and goes well on a NATO.

Otherwise, dress watches like a Rodina or Orient Bambino might be more up your alley. Good luck!

u/no1likesthetunahere · 1 pointr/motocamping

Yea, "craps table" :P


You guys sound rad! Keep it up. Just a few suggestions in case you haven't thought of them:

  • microfiber towel (cheap on Amazon, dry super fast)
  • headlamp (because you somehow always ending up arriving late and setting up a tent needs 2 hands)
  • Morrivoe Outdoor Folding Chair Portable Mesh Chair with Aluminum Alloy Support,Suitable for Camping Picnic Fishing Hiking + Free Carry Bag (Green) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B01M8IBYVC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_DI6RybVGZ2D8Z
    Packs up very small, lightweight, super comfy. Because your butt needs a good lounge after a full day of riding. A rock/stump/picnic table doesn't cut it
  • Klymit 06SVGR01C Static V Camping Mattress (Green-Grey, Large) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_VM6RybFHWN4Z1
    There is no better mattress for bike camping. It packs down the smallest and lightest. While being 100% comfortable.
  • zip ties, paracord and duct tape wrapped around an old credit card. Because you can fix absolutely anything with this trifecta


    Hope that helps!
u/M_Mitchell · 2 pointsr/MTB

I have the Lynx 2 person tent and like it.

The Lynx 1 person also looks like a fantastic option.

Only thing I don't like is their performance in the wind. If the wind hits the sides it'll blow into you a little but if you are not in a field you should be more than fine.

Are you trying to put your bike into it too? I just ran a chain around a tree and through the bike and then ran one of the tents supports through and made it supported by the bike so noone could remove it while I was sleeping.

Here is something that kinda includes your bike but it's not going to shield your bike if that's what you want.

My personal recommendation is to go with one of the lynxs and then use the rest of your budget for a decent flashlight/lantern, and a sleeping pad.

This is my sleeping pad and while nice, I would recommend getting something a little bigger because I would roll on the edges pretty frequently.

u/e39lemansm5 · 3 pointsr/Watches

I'd recommend one of Orient's divers:

Ray

Mako


There are several color options and they are great for the money. In house movements, decent bracelets and in my opinion, great looking. I have the ray raven and love it.

If you want to spend a little more, the Bernhardt Binnacle Diver is another great option. I also own one of these and I can tell you the biggest difference compared to the Orients is in the bracelet. It has to be one of the best ones on the market in that price range.

u/Jacob_The_Duck · 1 pointr/bicycling

Hey nice bike! If I were you I would add a saddle bag with some tubes, tire levers, and maybe get a small pump, and since you're just commuting the whole "it ain't aero" thing doesn't really fucking matter in my opinion ;) I would recommend this and these and this. Also read up on sites like Sheldon Brown for basics, and also I would recommend the GCN youtube channel for repair and maintenance. Also as far as locks go get a U-lock like this for most security and use this locking method. Have fun and stay safe, and feel free to ask any questions to me or any of the other people on this sub!

u/psychedelicgulch · 16 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

Packs- Your pack is usually recommended to be one of the last things you pick up. That being said the Osprey Exos is a great pack and one of the staple packs you'll see. Wait until you get all of your gear and then go to REI or another outfitter and see how big of one you think you'll need.

Sleeping Bags- It generally won't get too cold so you can get away with a 30 or 40 degree bag. Right at the start of your trip it may be a little brisk so just have an extra fleece on hand. A lot of people like the Enlightened Equipment Revelation quilts. They're great and lightweight, but expensive and some side sleepers don't like them.

Tents- There's millions of options, Big Agnes, Six Moon Designs, HMD, and tons more I can think of. The Big Agnes Fly Creek UL 2 is popular and lightweight, its going for $265 online right now. If that's too expensive I'd say go for the Six Moon Designs Skyscape Scout for $125.

Trekking Poles- These aren't super important unless your tent requires them. Best ones I've seen for a decent price: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XM0YGW8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Cooking- You can go the alcohol stove route, I don't like it because you'll end up carrying more weight in alcohol than with a regular stove. The BRS 3000t is probably the lightest and cheapest stove you can find. For pots just a simple titanium pot will work.

Good luck on your hike!

u/mountainheatherhiker · 1 pointr/CampingGear

I'm not sure where you live, but buying gear in Scandinavia will cost a pretty penny. You probably need an ~15F/-10C bag to be comfy (as the weather looks to low around freezing). Else look for a COMFORT RATING around freezing (32F/0C). While a $300+ bag will probably be "better" (by better I mostly mean lighter) you should be able to find something reasonable for quite a bit less assuming you don't live in Scandinavia. Both of the bags you were looking at are from reputable companies, I can't read them (google translate isn't working for the site) but if they are within the ratings above and are acceptable in size/weight they will be fine. Make sure to get a good mat if you don't have one. I recommend klymit. Hope this helps!

u/edheler · 2 pointsr/preppers

Don't let fear of the future define you. You will have a much happier life if you just don't worry about what might happen. Plan for the worst but expect the best. Then planning for things that might happen is just a fun hobby and thought exercise.

Try to find a Sawyer Mini for water filtering. They are probably about €20 since they are $20 here in the US. It's easily the best option for water filtering at the moment.

At your age I would try to find a way to get into backpacking and camping. It will give you a good reason to have the kind of equipment you want to get without anyone thinking it was anything strange. It will just be a normal everyday kind of hobby that other people do. Just don't tell them about your other reasons for doing it.

u/freeshavocadew · 2 pointsr/knives

Morakniv makes some great budget fixed blades, some are quite small and most have a general utilitarian use. Here's a model for less than $17 and these have built a really good reputation for value and hard use.

However, maybe that isn't quite what you're looking for. Maybe you want something thicker, more substantial? Continuing with fixed blades is the ESEE 4P which before shipping is $99. Another option would be the Ontario Knife Company's RAT-7 for currently $63. Being an avid knife collector, I have maybe 150 total knives total. That said, I think if I had only 1 knife to take out with me and feel secure in doing so, the Kabar/Becker BK7 would be it. For ~$78 new on Amazon, it's just a big hunk of steel (1095 steel specifically) that can tear through almost anything you put in front of it from wood to meat to a car door panel lol. I would recommend looking into some customization for it for a couple for reasons. The black plastic handle scales that it comes with are not so great. This can be resolved by using a bike tire inner tube mod OR just grabbing those ~$40 micarta scales that the link suggests below the photos of the knife itself. The sheath is definitely serviceable for your needs, but you may eventually want to upgrade it to a kydex sheath, or even a leather one if you really like leather. Finally, the coating that's on all of the Becker knives has the benefit of protecting the blade very well but the cost is a lot of friction and eventually that coating will wear off and it'll look different. Many modders just strip that coating off and blue or force patina it and frequently oil after use. Or go the other route and spend hours up front polishing it to a mirror polish and now you have a knife that will look really Bowie-ish.

u/fromkentucky · 2 pointsr/Survival

I had an Ontario RAT-5 for a while. About the same size as an ESEE 5, but with a thinner blade and full-flat grind. The handle was uncomfortably bulky and although it held up to my abuse, I just didn't like it. The blade was thin enough to do finer carving tasks, but it was too wide and the edge profile was terrible. I ended up using my Mora knife and Fiskars hatchet more and the RAT-5 was relegated to batoning duty and even in that I preferred the hatchet. In fact, I carved my first bow drill kit with that Fiskars.

I was considering stepping up to an Ontario RAT-7, but instead I traded the RAT-5 for a KaBar Becker BK7, which is a BEAST of a knife. Longer than an ESEE 5, but just as thick and with a similar profile. It really impressed me with the amount of work it could do and how easy it was to use, but it was heavy and just too fat to do anything but chop and split, so again, I was using my Mora and hatchet for most stuff.

I finally decided to try a different direction and traded the BK7 for a much smaller ESEE 4. Around the same time I bought a Bahco Laplander, and I am in love with this combo. The Bahco eats through 1-2" branches with ease (while generating plenty of sawdust for tinder) and the ESEE is just long enough to baton them into kindling and carve up some feather sticks. The best part is, the ESEE 4 and Bahco together weigh about as much as the BK7 in its sheath, and take up about as much space, but they are FAR more versatile.

I realize the ESEE 4 may be just out of your price range, but Kabar makes a similar knife called the BK16. However, the ESEE comes with a lifetime warranty.

I still take my Fiskars with me occasionally, but for weekend camping, I can process plenty of firewood with the ESEE and Bahco faster than I ever could with any of the bigger knives. If I needed to build a shelter or was venturing into unfamiliar territory, I'd want the hatchet because it's such a capable tool.

The ESEE 5 was designed for downed pilots who can't fit a hatchet or folding saw into their kit but may need to build a shelter, so they made it big and heavy. I understand first hand that big knives are appealing and certainly have their strong points, but their size, weight and thickness can make them difficult to use in a lot of ways and in reality, a big knife will never chop as well as a decent hatchet, because the knife's weight is centered just above the handle, not directly behind a huge wedge that drives into the wood. What you really want in a survival knife is versatility and I've spent a lot of time, money and energy figuring out that size doesn't add versatility.

u/ashirian · 3 pointsr/Watches

I think you could find good citizen Eco Drive that has similar function as PRC200 : http://www.amazon.com/Citizen-AT0200-05E-Eco-Drive-Chronograph-Canvas/dp/B000EQR6H0/ref=sr_1_6?s=watches&ie=UTF8&qid=1335766853&sr=1-6

Or a Seiko Kinetic
http://www.amazon.com/Seiko-SSB045-Special-Value-Kinetic/dp/B00756FJJ4/ref=sr_1_5?s=watches&ie=UTF8&qid=1335767001&sr=1-5

Another option for quartz since you were looking at PRC200, is Orient TT0Z001B Limited Edition STI Ion Plated chronograph.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=TeMpz-cxl8A

The Orient used to give out 50% off coupon but they don't do that anymore just 30%.. so $440 retail, 50% would have been $220.
http://orientwatchusa.com/tt0z001b

For what you get, I think it's good deal at $170. 5 left until sold out. 4 left.
http://www.discountwatchstore.com/Orient-TT0Z001B-Mens-Limited-Edition-STI-Black-Ion-Plated-Chronograph_p_27651.html
_____
If you want an automatic mechanical watch, I would suggest Orient Mako, Seiko 5 series, or Sea-Gull watch.

http://www.amazon.com/Orient-Mens-CEM65002D-Automatic-Watch/dp/B001EWEQ3K/ref=sr_1_1?s=watches&ie=UTF8&qid=1335767894&sr=1-1

http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-MENS-ORIENT-ORIGINAL-DIVER-AUTOMATIC-STANLEY-STEEL-WITH-BOX-GIFT-/350497575972?pt=Wristwatches&var=&hash=item519b489424#ht_1402wt_901

http://www.ebay.com/itm/350497575972?var=620037004130&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649#ht_1402wt_901

http://www.amazon.com/Seiko-Sports-Automatic-Watch-SNZG13/dp/B006BUE84M/ref=sr_1_31?s=watches&ie=UTF8&qid=1335767513&sr=1-31

I have that Seiko SNZG13 and it's great on my wrist. I think for smaller wrist, you should look at 38mm~42mm. I have a 43mm watch and the lugs hover over my wrist. I have two 41mm watches that I wear most frequently and those are Orient and Seiko SNZG13.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Sea-Gull-M186S-automatic-designer-watch-multi-purpose-comfortable-to-wear-/280841797985?pt=Wristwatches&var=&hash=item416379c161#ht_642wt_1141

I'm getting this Sea-Gull next. For the price this is a beautiful piece with classic roman numeral dial with blue hands. I have a cheap Parnis with ST-25 but the movement is just dead accurate. More so accurate than my Orient and Seiko 7s26. I'd say accuracy is Sea-Gull>Orient>7s26 in this order with Seiko being most elusive sometimes. Plus with Sea-Gull automatic, you get the movement that you can hand wind as well as hack. So all in all the Sea-Gull may be your best bet at EXACTLY $120. You'll get a penny back.

Hope it helped.

u/keithcozz · 1 pointr/Watches

It ain't shitty, it is just another fashion brand watch. It will likely last a long time, but that really is all I can say for it.

Were I you, I'd buy the dude a good mechanical watch as a (inexpensive) gift. The Orient Mako is, I believe, the absolute best wristwatch that one can buy for $250 or less. They are owned by Seiko (another company you can't go wrong with).

Anyway, these are just my opinions, and I doso hope that I was at least a little helpful.

u/Peoples_Bropublic · 1 pointr/knives

A fixed blade would be perfect. Mora knives are excellent inexpensive knives that are quite commonly used for camping. They make some with wooden handles, composite handles, stainless blades, and carbon blades. My understanding is that their stainless blades don't hold an edge quite as well as their carbon blades, but carbon blades have the disadvantage of being susceptible to rust. So for an outdoor camping application where you're likely to be running around in dirt and mud and rain and lakes and streams and not likely to have a supply of rubbing alcohol, clean cloths, metal polish, and mineral oil, a stainless blade with composite handle would probably serve you best.

On the other hand, Cody London, that hippy dude from Dual Survival pretty much exclusively uses classic Moras with wooden handles and carbon blades. On the other other hand, he also doesn't wear pants or shoes.

Here are a few to look at.

u/holganaut · 1 pointr/backpacking

I can't speak for this particular tent but I have spent my fair share of time in cheap tents... Here is all I can say...

You get what you pay for. A cheap tent will be too hot, or too cold. A cheap tent will leak. A cheap tent will tear. A cheap tent will not hold up....

If you plan on doing this 3 day trip and that is it, I would say go for it. If you don't mind a little discomfort, just get the cheap tent. If you plan on camping/backpacking a few times a year, bite the bullet and get a nicer tent. Budget camping can be tough, but you have a few alternative solutions...

Hammocks: Camping hammocks seem to have grown in popularity over the past few years. They are excellent in warm weather. Hammocks will feel very cold very quickly if the temperatures drop. There is no insulation beneath you without adding it yourself. They can be a little bit cheaper than tents, but they can get pricey quick if you get the tarp, bug net, blankets, pillows, etc... Eno is the most popular brand, but consider cheaper alternatives such as Grand Trunk.. I have this particular hammock and it has served me well.

REI outlet (or other online stores): The REI website has a portion dedicated to gear that is last years model and simply needs to be sold. I have seen $300 tents drop as low as $150. Keep an eye out for a great deal on new gear!

REI Scratch and Dent Sale: From time to time, REI will do a giant sale on gear that has been returned. While some gear may actually have a defect, the generous return policy of REI allows customers to abuse the company. It is said that some customers think that REI stands for "Rent-Every-Item." During these sales, items will drop in price anywhere from 30-70 percent off retail value. Consider an REI membership and participate in sales.

Roughing it: I am not sure about the campsites you will visit or the weather you are to expect. If it is warm and dry, a quilt on the ground, a pillow, and a light blanket can suffice... Once again, this is very conditional and not advised in adverse weather or climates....

u/slip81 · 1 pointr/Watches

Citizen, Seiko, and Orient would probably be your best best in that price range, here are some examples you might like, all on the smaller side
orient
seiko
here
here
here
Citizen
here
here
here

the biggest one is 43mm, which would probably look fine, I wear a 42mm and have small writs as well and it looks good. good luck

u/lablack786 · 0 pointsr/longboarding

Hi! I'm a beginner and I'm shopping for my first board. I have an Amazon gift card so I'm kinda limited to just Amazon boards. I was pretty set on picking up the Quest Super Cruiser and some Zealous bearings because basically every beginner picks this board up to learn longboarding and the bearings would replace the standard crappy ones, but I just found this new board on Amazon called the Quest Super Cruiser Remix (basically a shorter version of the original Quest board). I can't find that many reviews online about it, but it's shorter (i'm on a college campus with tons of pedestrians so this would be a huge plus), and has a sick design (I love blue lol). Any thoughts on the board? Should I get the original black Quest 44" or opt for this "Remix" at 36"?

Link for OG Quest Board: https://www.amazon.com/Quest-QT-NSC44C-Original-Longboard-Skateboard/dp/B008EZNY4W/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=quest+board&qid=1569023486&s=sporting-goods&sr=1-3

Link for Quest Remix Board: https://www.amazon.com/Super-Cruiser-Bamboo-Longboard-Skaeboard/dp/B01HD50Q1M/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

u/PM_ME_UR_HTTPD_CONF · 3 pointsr/springfieldMO

Honestly I think you're going to be paying a premium IRL when you could get a Quest from Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Quest-Cruiser-Artisan-Longboard-Skateboard/dp/B008EZNY4W/ref=sr_1_1?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1458321531&sr=1-1&keywords=longboard

it was my first board, and it served its purposed.

Once you make your noob mistakes on a cheap board you'll have a small clique of skaters who will let you try out various board setups and be able to purchase your first high-end board with confidence.

/r/longboarding was super helpful for me. Awesome community, awesome mods, and awesome content. 10/10

Don't forget your safety gear.

Have fun


EDIT: One think I forgot to mention in hindsight I think learning on a board using mediocre bearings and whatnot is good.

The first time I bombed a hill using a Landyachtz with non-shit hardware I think I quite literally said "holy fuck this is fast!"

I wasn't skilled enough for that board....

A few moments later I was on my ass.

u/MrClahn · 3 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

Whilst i spent a fair amount on my pack, sleeping bag and pad, and tent the rest i cheaped out on. Echoing what others have said but most clothing you can get cheap (any poly/.running t shirts and base layers, sleeping socks, gloves, hat, swimming trunks), trash bag for pack liner, cat can alcohol stove (or stoveless, if you prefer canister then there's always this for cheap and light http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U ) , uniqlo UL down jacket (you can get them on ebay for at least half price to), frogg toggs for waterproofs. Darn tough socks might be expensive at first but the warranty would probably make them worth it in the case of a thru hike. Cascade Mountain Tech Carbon Fiber poles if you want to use hiking poles for $30. Depending on your budge the Six Moon Designs Scout tent is lightweight (34 oz) and only $125. CCF pads are much cheaper and fine for some, but i'd try and test one out first if you can.

Second hand gear is always a good way to go, i stalked eBay a fair bit getting gear together. As far as shoes go, trail runners are very popular but do tend to have shorter lives so i'd recommend approach shoes (such as Merrell Moab Vents) which tend to last a bit longer. The biggest way to save money though is to just not buy gear, which will also help keep your weight down. If you just embrace the fact you're going to stink and be dirty from the start then you don't need that second t shirt and trousers/trunks, less pairs of socks and underwear etc.

u/LogicalyImpaired · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

First off, you two rock seriously. I am amazed by the generosity, and wish I had the means to do the same. Just know, even if its not me thats selected, the gratitude and appreciation is there.

That being said. The item that I want/need that is on my WL is this here (Its in my random stuff list, first page): http://www.amazon.com/Competitor-729-Olympic-Weight-Bench/dp/B00245LJX6/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pd_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=GZ23EIUTDBK0&coliid=I1BHEALAEBYP80 I have finally cleared out the space in my spare room and will be turning it into a workout room. I really want to, and need to get healthy. This is part of my plan to do so.

And onto part two (its in my camping gear list).... C'mon...gimmie.
http://www.amazon.com/Grand-Trunk-Ultralight-Hammock-Forrest/dp/B001AIHB76/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=3MBIYM75BTZOF&coliid=I1457MYHZJCKIR&psc=1

And last but not least...while I can not see what you two look like at this current moment, your beautiful souls are shining through and making you two look amazing, seriously.

u/lavacahacemu · 4 pointsr/cycling

You don't really say where you are and what type of riding you'll be doing but here's my $0.02 on what I've done and would recommend to others.


Clipless Pedals + Shoes --> These are the newer version to what I use on my roadie, but if you want the versatility of the dual clipless or the single+flat on the other side, you can do that. Or you can go with full-road-cleated pedals, of course. For the shoes, try some out at a store, the internet hasn't replaced this step.

Saddle bag -- I err.. duct taped a tube to my seatpost and carry the rest of my crap in my jersey pockets.

Water bottle -- If you ride in extreme weather, consider an insulated bottle, it's sooo nice to fill with iced water and have cool water to dring on 100F+ days

Pump -- I have one that came with a bracket to bolt under the water cages, maybe look for one like it (can't remember the brand of mine)

??? (I have no idea what else I will need) -- you'll need/want:

  • a multitool to adjust or fix anything that can come up. I have the park multitool and I don't really recommend it as there's probably better tools out there for road bike use, just make sure that it has a chain tool included.
  • Tire levers, if they aren't included somehow in the multitool. I always carry one extra so I can have 3 leverage points if I get a flat.
  • With a new bike you might need bottle cages.
  • Get some chain lube if you don't have any.
  • Depending on chain brand, a power link or quick link
  • For patch kits, the park one is pretty much OK but do stay away from the self-adhering ones, they're garbage!
u/Kid-The-Billy · 1 pointr/camping

I have an Teton outdoors scout 3400. It's a 54L bag that is really comfortable and has some good features and is pretty affordable the msrp is about 140, but you can find it on amazo ng for about 80. It a good quality bag at a pretty good price and it comes I a couple different colors. It also has a great warranty that protects against defects for the entire lifetime of the bag.


TETON Sports Scout 3400 Internal Frame https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000F34ZKS/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_qNgyCbX0KY5RM

u/hurricanefalcon · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

You won't find a good skeleton watch in that price range. If you do find one it may look nice, but more than likely it'll be very cheaply made and won't be built to last. For around 150 you have a ton of options. I'd recommend the

Seikon SKX007

or various Seiko 5's 1 2



Orient Mako, it comes in a variety of colors

Deep Blue makes a nice dive watch, this is the quartz version, the mechanical version is a little more expensive.

You can also look into homage watches like Alpha but these are lesser quality than the ones listed above. I'd stay away from brands like Invicta, Stuhrling, and even something like Skagen. If you're going to shell out $150 might as well get your money's worth.

u/SwervingNShit · 1 pointr/cycling

It's always suggested to get a new helmet. You don't know if it's been involved in a slight crash or had anything happen to it that would compromise its safety.

What kind of lights did you get??

I'd like to think I have some properly good lights and I've only spent ~$70 on them

Here's what I have: 2Watt Cygolite hotshot tail light ~$30 and another Cygolite headlight that can do short 600lm flashes, but has a few modes around 500lm or so, $50, but this is what I ordered last month for a friend who recently got into cycling, same 2W tail light & another headlight that's just a bump below the 550 I linked above for $60

Unless you've got some whopping mountain trail lights, I feel like $130 is a bit high, I'm all for supporting LBSs, but sometimes they get silly.

Anyways, stay safe & nice fucking deal on the bike.

u/otrojake · 4 pointsr/whichbike

I built up a Disc Trucker last spring. I stuck closely to Surly's build in the gearing department as it mainly is a touring bike. I went 9-speed because the chains are a touch more durable and when you get into 10-speed, Shimano's road and mountain offerings start having some incompatibilities. With a 9-speed drivetrain, you can mix and match road and mountain to whatever extent you like.

I actually have two different gearing setups. One for true touring with a mountain rear derailleur and an 11-34 cassette and another with a road rear derailleur and a 12-26 cassette.

Here's relevant parts off my list:

|Part|Model|Other|Notes|
|:---|:---|:---|:---|
|Crankset|Shimano Deore M590|175mm arm length|Has the trekking gearing 26/36/48 and Hollowtech because why not.|
|Rear cassette|SRAM PG-950|11-34 for touring, 12-26 for commuting|Yes, as far as casettes go, it's a heavy bugger. But when we're talking about LHTs, who really cares overly much about weight? As a side note, you'd need a mountain derailleur to use the 11-34, but you'd be just fine with the 12-26 for your 105.|
|Shifters|Shimano Dura-Ace 9-speed bar-end||If you're using this for touring, I'd recommend the bar ends. Otherwise, get whatever brifters you like, use a couple of Travel Agents and get some V-brakes.|
|Brake levers|Tektro RL520|Long-pull|Those guys are long pull, so they work with V-brakes and mountain-pull disc brakes. Ergonomics are decent, if a tad too pointy for my tastes.|
|Handlebars|Salsa Bell Lap||No longer being produced, sadly.|
|Saddle|Brooks Champion Flyer||I've put thousands and thousands of miles on this saddle. Love it. It's a little heavy if you're doing light commuting. For daily commuting and touring, though, it's hard to beat.|
|Pedals|Shimano M520||They're pretty low on the totem pole as far as component level, but I've had nary a problem with multiple sets. Clipless that won't break the bank.|
|Chain|SRAM PC-951||It's a cheaper chain more than adequate for commuting and touring.|

All the drivetrain stuff is 9-speed, but you can find the 10-speed equivalents rather easily. In your case, if you're not setting off across the country or across the world on your LHT, I'd say go for a set of brifters. If you want to go 9-speed, I'd look for an older set of Ultegra shifters. For 10-speed, I'd keep it 105 or above...or Rival or above for SRAM. SRAM has a lot more tactile feedback on the shifts while Shimano tends to be smoother. I prefer SRAM, but to each their own. Bar-ends are great and low maintenance, but not being able to shift from the hoods can get a little annoying after a while.

As to online retailers, a lot of parts can be had reasonably from Amazon. I also use Jenson USA. They ship fast, have free shipping on orders above $50, and price match on parts. I use Nashbar occasionally, but their shipping department is woefully slow and I avoid buying from them whenever possible.

u/Middle_Eats · 2 pointsr/camping

Keep it simple at first. Find an easy loop (less than 10 miles so you don’t have to plan for water) near you. Alltrails is a good app that will help you start doing that.

There’s no need to start with car camping unless you already have the gear for that. Part of the fun of backpacking is gradually figuring out what gear you do and don’t need, what to bring, and what to leave behind. So release yourself to that journey. There is a joy in the ignorance of starting a new hobby.

That being said, your “big four” items are going to be a sleeping bag, tent, sleeping pad, and cooking system. For a cooking system, I would say an MSR Pocket rocket is absolutely the best go-to. That, plus fuel, and a lighter will be enough for you to get dehydrated meals made. I like to bring a measuring cup if I’m using dehydrated meals. That little bit of precision is really worth it.

To start fires at your campsite, you can put cotton balls in a plastic bag and soak them in isopropyl alcohol. Lint from your dryer also helps to start campfires.

Not sure what your budget is on gearing up, but absolutely avoid Walmart/Coleman brand stuff. Speaking from experience on that point.

You can find affordable, entry level stuff on amazon. A good starter tent for one person is here:

ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1-Person Tent https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BMKD1DU/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_UG5QBb04ZP4E1

High quality sleeping bags that are warm and lightweight are going to be pricey, but you can find some inexpensive ones on amazon that will get the job done.

I really like the Big Agnes sleeping pad. Been using that for a while now. Also, Osprey backpacks are very much worth the price tag.

u/yanawhite · 5 pointsr/hammockcamping

I have a Grand Trunk Brand Hammock that looks and feels just like the expensive Eno hammocks, but i got it off Amazon for $19.99. It doesn't come with straps, but I found an awesome set of straps for $4.99 on Amazon as well. If you are interested, let me know and I will send you the links!
Edit: spelling, and heres the link for the hammock: Grand Trunk Ultralight Hammock (Forest Green) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001AIHB76/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_VHywxbV0QYDTV

u/devingboggs · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

I use this

G-raphy Camera Insert Bag with Sleeve Camera Case (Orange)

and put in in the bottom most part of whichever hiking bag I'm using. For my larger pack (65L) (https://www.amazon.com/Teton-Sports-Internal-High-Performance-Backpacking/dp/B000F34ZKS/ref=sr_1_2?crid=3QLFXUFBOG8OX&keywords=teton+backpack+65l&qid=1550902518&s=gateway&sprefix=65l+teto%2Caps%2C151&sr=8-2).

I put it in the sleeping bag compartment like arcana73. Then use the outside loops of the sleeping compartment usually used for tents for the tripod. Want to keep that weight low for stability and to maximize comfort. That insert bag holds my canon 6d body, my 70-300mm, my 50mm pancake, and my 14mm rokinon wide lens. I use a seperate bag I got for my iOptron skytracker to hold filters, remote shutter, additional sds, and so on. For my tent and sleeping bag I simply just put those in the main compartment, opting usually for a light hammock set-up when the weather's good.

​

Overall I think a larger backpacking pack will do wonders for the duality you want, leaving room for food and supplies you'll need for those few days. Just be sure to get a nice insert to organize your gear and make sure you get a bag that allows it to be readily accessible like with a sleeping bag compartment, it will save you alot of headache of not having to take out all your stuff to get to your camera!

​

PS When looking into his I'd recommend also getting some external mounting system for your camera onto your packso you can minimize stopping time for fool around in the bag to put the camera in and out. Something like the Peak Design's clip (https://www.googleadservices.com/pagead/aclk?sa=L&ai=DChcSEwjig_Pfm9HgAhUVjcgKHef7BOMYABAIGgJxdQ&ohost=www.google.com&cid=CAESEeD2tnd3YimtpuoDUrupzsjx&sig=AOD64_1VNtF2qgoCRHRekkWs4nNs0xkT6Q&ctype=5&q=&ved=0ahUKEwj21Ozfm9HgAhWtm-AKHQoIC58Q9aACCDc&adurl=https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1086507-REG/peak_design_cp_2_capture_pro_camera_clip.html/?ap=y&gclid=Cj0KCQiA2L7jBRCBARIsAPeAsaMvphVGvlxGsKqAxoQjry9wyVVOGvLmxwoq7sOaB7o-6ePuao0kMUUaAmGkEALw_wcB&lsft=BI%3A514&smp=Y) helps a lot with this subtle annoyance.

u/eeget9Eo · 1 pointr/bicycling

I realized I need to buy some stuff to maintain my bike, and was looking for some input on what to get for the 'essentials'.

I need a repair stand. I was thinking about this model from Amazon. Seems to have decent reviews. I have a step-through bike so I guess I just hold it by the seat post and that's fine?

I also wanted to adjust my saddle position and the seat post length, do I need a torque wrench for this? I found this one. Should I just get a fixed torque one? Or just use normal hex keys and save my money?

For cleaning the chain and drive train, is it worth getting one of those special chain cleaning tools and cycle specific degreaser or can I just use "LA's Totally Awesome" cleaner and degreaser from Dollar Tree and a couple of floor scrub brushes held together? The Dollar Tree product I have already because I use it diluted as a general cleaner. At full strength it can soften certain plastics and remove some paints so it's pretty strong.

Is there any other stuff that I'm missing that I need for basic maintenance that I'm missing?

u/Unusual_Steak · 3 pointsr/MTB

I transitioned into working on my bikes almost entirely by myself (Wheel building/suspension service/bearings excluded) and this is the exact path I went down as well. Here is everything I bought from Amazon:

The same $50 tool kit

Torque wrench

Cable/housing/wire cutter

Chain/quick link pliers


Wet/Dry Chain lubes

Park Tool grease

Degreaser

Blue Loctite

Carbon grip paste

And some additional small things like cables, cable end caps, ferrules, zip ties, etc. A set of needle nose pliers can be handy to help push/pull stubborn cables/housings as well.

Also, to make working on the bike 10x easier, I recommend getting a stand. I use this one because I am space constrained and it folds up nice and small, but there are probably better ones out there.

It seems like a lot of $$ to lay out at first, but it pays for itself pretty quickly compared to taking the bike to a shop every time you need to do something to it. Basically everything you need to do can be found on YouTube as well.

u/tkari · 12 pointsr/UCDavis

I recommend getting a U-Lock along with an extension cable. You want to put the U-Lock somewhere through the rear triangle like this.
This locks the rear wheel and the frame. Then you want to loop the extension cable through the U-Lock and put it through your front tire so it is also secure. Kryptonite, Abus, and On Guard are all good lock brands. Something like this lock would work fine, but there are more expensive options if you want to be more secure. I personally use this lock. All locks are about buying time because an angle grinder can cut through any lock in a few minutes. I suggest parking it to something secure, something public, and well-lit. Also, make sure to register your bike through TAPS because if someone steals your bike or puts a lock on it, they won't be able to help you. Good luck!

u/MadCabbages · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Wow, fantastic answer. Thank you!

By cheapish I mean all gear for the trip for under about €500.

Re Gear: I couldn't find suppliers for the gear you suggested in Europe and shipping was very expensive from the US so what do you think of these.
Tent
Sleeping Bag
Sleeping Mat
Stove set
with something like this as a bear bag (with rope etc)?

Re Food: Yes there is alot of villeges/towns along the way. However I was looking at this and thought it might be a good idea.. I will look into water purification device as well.

I don't think my budget will extend to a GPS device this time around so a map/compass + smartphone it is!

Sorry for all the silly questions. Your answer the last time helped a lot!

u/kylorhall · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

They may not be at Costco though, they really come and go. This is my recommendation as well, but I had to buy mine off Amazon (link). They did well when weighed ~250lbs and a far heavier pack than I have now; they lock really well and did great with a lot of elevation. Saved my butt on one trip and I definitely used them thoroughly.

u/JB1549 · 7 pointsr/ThingsIWishIKnew

Biking in the rain isn't very fun. It's not too bad, but your tires can slip on some surfaces (usually metal). I had to cross some railroad tracks on my route and the tires could easily slip on the metal surfaces.

Also, in the winter, you'll want to wear gloves, otherwise your hands will get pretty cold from the cold air.

Develop a system to make sure you packed your clothes. I've left a few times for work without packing a shirt.

You may want to invest in a bike horn. I have one like this. It helps to alert cars to your presence, but will probably scare pedestrians, so be careful.

Also, you'll probably want to wear sunglasses, otherwise debris can get into your eyes.

I'd invest in a decent quality road bike. Mine was a $1000 Trek, but that's maybe a slight step above entry level. A good quality bike will cost you over $500. Road bikes are so nice. I was able to consistently go around 20 MPH. with bursts up to 25-30. I actually used to take a lane in rush hour traffic when I lived in my downtown area. I could keep up with the stop and go traffic and it was a great workout.

Wear a helmet!

Get lights, especially for winter when it gets dark earlier.

Visibility is key when riding near traffic, get reflective tape for your bike and reflective ankle bands so cars can see you.

Bike defensively. Worse accident I got in was when I was going by an alley and a car came out of the alley and didn't see me. Luckily I saw them so was able to avoid too much damage.

Either learn to do the maintenance yourself or take your bike into a shop to get maintenance every year or so.

Anyway, good luck! I enjoyed biking into work. I need to get back into it, but it takes good self discipline to wake up early enough to bike into work. I was lucky enough to have a locker room and showers at my workplace, and a bike locker. I really have no excuses other than the fact that driving is so much easier.

u/Pulptastic · 3 pointsr/bicycling

Pedal: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000WYAENC/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1395772017&sr=8-1&pi=SY200_QL40

There are other options, but those are the most common, they're cheap, and use the same cleats as the bikes at spin class. You can always upgrade later if you find a reason not to like these; pedals usually come with cleats and most or all MTB cleats use the same 2 bolt mount so they will work with your MTB shoes.

Shoes: go to LBS and try some on. All MTB shoes should be good for walking, but different brands fit differently. Or order online from somewhere with free returns in case they don't fit; the Shimano M-088 are a good start, I love the ratchet buckle.

u/Dingo8urBaby · 2 pointsr/cycling

I recommend checking out /r/bikecommuting. Although it sounds like you have already been commuting by bike, so I apologize if you already know what I'm saying. I'm assuming because you are asking about what you wear for winter cycling that you do not regularly commute in winter/have a short commute.

You will need to get lights for commuting, especially as winter approaches (assuming that you are in the Northern hemisphere). I have the Cygolite Expillion 350 and the PDW Danger Zone. I once read that a blinking rear light is good for being noticed but a solid light is good for driver depth perception, so my helmet has a red light in back that I keep solid in the evening/night. I will eventually get a second real rear light.

As for clothing - what is your climate going to look like this winter? I was commuting in upstate New York and wore generic winter running tights, wool socks, UA coldgear shirt, a down vest, gloves, and a thin scarf that went around my neck and over my head under my helmet. When I wore thick wool mittens over my gloves, I was toasty in that down to 14 F. I never got goggles/glasses, but they would have been nice when it sleeted.

I don't have any cycling specific wear. I re-purpose what I already have or buy things that will work for multiple activities.

I wash my bike (or at least rinse it off) after any ride where salt from the road was kicked up. Last winter I had a toothbrush and would gently scrub my derailleurs to get off the ice and would use a damp rag to wipe it down. Again, I was biking in upstate New York. I have since moved south and don't yet know what this winter will mean for biking. I'm assuming a lot less ice and a lot less salt.

u/slapplebags · 1 pointr/hab

[foam box, apply duct tape to hold shut] (https://www.grainger.com/product/12F276?gclid=CjwKCAiAwZTuBRAYEiwAcr67OYmFsxWbQPsZ6q6G2LcJL5M4zB0FDx7diAlZz8JqX1lQ9P6GeFZPjBoCnbAQAvD_BwE&cm_mmc=PPC:+Google+PLA&ef_id=CjwKCAiAwZTuBRAYEiwAcr67OYmFsxWbQPsZ6q6G2LcJL5M4zB0FDx7diAlZz8JqX1lQ9P6GeFZPjBoCnbAQAvD_BwE:G:s&s_kwcid=AL!2966!3!50916733197!!!g!82129239837!)

just a thing to hold your electronics in to keep them insulated from the cold during flight, and cushioned for the impact of landing.

[piezo electric buzzer, attach to arduino to give an audible alarm to help track down your payload after landing] (https://www.adafruit.com/product/1536?gclid=CjwKCAiAwZTuBRAYEiwAcr67OVsUCcFPwRh9nBWLsDKDr9_VNEnteEJxQoZ5P8Z_j0ddqz6boPAyfRoCeLkQAvD_BwE)

not required but can be helpful when hunting down your payload

[hand warmer] (https://smile.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-Odorless-Activated/dp/B0007ZF4OA?sa-no-redirect=1)

also optional, i've never used them, generally used to keep your batteries warmer as warm batteries perform better than cold.

[GPS Antenna] (https://store.uputronics.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=72&search=gps)

gotta get GPS signals somehow, i highly suggest the MAX M8Qs from Ublox

[AA battery packs, i suggest using the energizer ultimate lithium batteries] (https://www.digikey.com/products/en/battery-products/battery-holders-clips-contacts/86?k=battery+holder&k=&pkeyword=battery+holder&sv=0&pv91=355996&sf=0&FV=-8%7C86%2C32%7C306832%2C1989%7C0&quantity=&ColumnSort=0&page=1&pageSize=25)

you'll likely use a 4-6 pack that has the batteries connected in serial to supply the 5v the arduino needs

[trackuino shield and guide] (http://hab.education/pages/trackuino.html)

this tells you where your payload is via sites like aprs.fi

[cheap external temperature sensor] (https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/maxim-integrated/DS18B20/DS18B20-ND/956983)

the trackuino code already has provisions for this temp sensor so it requires very little modification to the code to use.

[antenna, no coat hangar required] (https://www.byonics.com/antennas)

Any antenna thats made to operate on 144.390 mhz (assuming you are in the US, other countries you'll have to check your band plan) will work. I make mine from 2 19" pieces of 20 gauge wire.

u/maxillo · 1 pointr/trailmeals

And remember you can just bring the bits you need. I like mine better for the weight actually, and have 2 different kits:


https://www.reddit.com/r/CampingGear/comments/2h32ru/picked_these_up_at_the_store_for_1495_and_1995/

I reeally like them and when i go by myself i just take the small one, and when 3 people I take them all and 2 stoves. I have an older pocket Rocket clone but got this little baby a few months ago for $10 or 11 bucks:

https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

I just try to be cheap thrifty so I do tend to look for sales and "clones". My buddy just bought the whole kit he needed for JMT and is in over 3 grand. My kit is pretty good and I am in for maybe $500-600.

I can always go back and buy the super expensive gram saving thing if I find I want to loose more weight from my pack down the road. But i figure at this point a diet will do more for trail weight than fancy gear.

u/xueimel · 5 pointsr/motocamping

I'm a big hammock fan, so I'm sorry if I get long winded. Been through a few hammocks in search of perfection (never worn one out). I started with this one, have the most experience with this one, most recently started using this one. Used hammocks to cover the south half of Wisconsin's state parks in 2013 on a CB750 wearing this backpack.

Finding trees the right distance was (impressively) never a problem for me. I've been thinking there should be a way to hang one side on the motorcycle should the need arise, but haven't yet had to test it. I'd really like to be able to hang from the motorcycle on one side and the frame on that pack on the other side, but don't know if the pack will support a person (hasn't been warm enough to test since I thought of this).

In terms of rain, I started with a generic big blue tarp from a hardware store. This was a bad idea, thing was bulky, loud, and inflexible to the point of being hard to work with. Now I use this and it does the job pretty well. I used a large size of this tarp for a while, but the one I got was too big and ultimately heavier than needed.

I'm sorry to bust your bubble, but hammocks can get cold at night. I used this sleeping pad, after a while added this to keep the shoulders warm. Sleeping on what feels like a massively oversized menstrual pad never felt right, plus they get a little awkward in a hammock. Everybody I've heard from recommends underquilts for proper insulation, and it took me until this year to bite the bullet and get one (they're not cheap). I just got this yesterday, and intend to test it tomorrow night.

This book has been widely recommended. I haven't read it yet, but at $4 for kindle, that's not a bad price. You can read it on a smartphone or computer with the kindle app (which is free).

It wasn't until I typed this all out that I realized how much money I probably spent on all this stuff. I didn't buy it all from Amazon, just convenient links.

u/keananmusic · 1 pointr/Ultralight

The REI Magma 850 Down Jacket is on sale for 50% off right now (13.75 oz) I got the same one without the hood when it was available and have loved it so far. This is nerdy as hell but you could get this dope glow in the dark multi purpose swiss army knife and save some weight. Get the BRS Stove and save a couple ounces. You could probably get by with the Anker 13000. Don't know what your sit pad is but the GG 1/8" Foam Pad is super light. I emailed GG and they said the pads would be available soon

u/MipselledUsername · 1 pointr/longboarding

I was looking for transportation that didn't require too much maintenance or storage for work. I (impulsively) settled on this Quest 44" board today.

I have 0 experience riding anything like this, but I figured youtube and safety gear have me covered

I feel like I should leave something here for discussion, but I'm just super pumped and felt like sharing (and didn't feel like junking up your sub with a "my first xyz!" post)

u/brendanvista · 2 pointsr/EDC

You should do a bit of reading to find out more about what you might want/need in a watch. Mechanical or quartz? Date window? Alarms? Waterproof?

That Invicta has treated me very well, and thus far has given me no reason to doubt it. It keeps great time too for a mechanical (look at the bonus album I posted; you can see into the back). However, I bought it against the recommendation of a lot of the watch community. Invicta has a hit and miss reputation, though the 8926ob is one of their best regarded models. If you're looking for a "Rolex Sub clone" there are some other options out there in a slightly higher price range that are from more respected brands. /r/watches might have some recommendations for you. I would personally look at this watch: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001EWEQ3A/ref=pd_aw_sim_241_1?ie=UTF8&dpID=51zhHeruIeL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL100_SR100%2C100_&refRID=164BC614FP2Z13EXSNE9


That all being said, the reviews for the 8926ob model are pretty positive, and Invictas may have just done it all right this time. Look at my other reply about the watch too. The movement (gears and springs) are made by a very reputable Japanese manufacturer, Seiko. Just be warned that it might not be a watch that will last long enough to be passed down to your grandkids like a real Rolex or something.

u/WWJBTPC · 2 pointsr/bicycling

People downvote me because I'm a little weird, but some of these are good, they have the capacity of being clipless, but still having the option of using regular shoes if you feel like it. If you want to save the weight and use only clipless these are good, they're simple clipless pedals, both are rather inexpensive, and if you feel like spending more money

u/tdotohdot · 2 pointsr/askTO

I've had some close calls. You can see in the stats that isn't particularly safe but I enjoy it and do my best. I got one of these for my bike and it helps to blast cabs and j walkers. much more effective than a bell, which I still use for passing etc

u/quarl0w · 5 pointsr/CampingGear

I'm doing my first camp in a long time next week with the scouts too. We are in Utah, but expect 30s overnight.

I am taking a cot, with an insulated sleeping pad, and a 0° bag. My son is fine in his 0° bag in a hammock, he's done a few at this temp without being too cold (even without an underquilt or pad).

I'm also a side sleeper, and feel too tight in mummy bags. I picked up a Teton Sports Polara bag, it was a little cheaper a month ago when I bought it. It's really nice. I tested it out with the cot and insulated pad, and it was very comfortable. It has a built in fleece liner that won't get all twisted because it clips and zips into the bag. They unzip fully, so you can get 2 and make a double bag. You can remove the fleece liner for warmer weather.

I will also be trying out an inflatable pillow for between my legs instead of a body pillow.

Check with your local REI store, see if they have a garage sale between now and the camp. You can get lots of stuff at about 70% off. I got my insulated stratus pad for $20 that's normally $100. Klymit makes a decent one that's well reviewed on Amazon and cheap.

Because I am rusty with camping, and getting involved with the local scouts, I will be camping more in the future, but have little to no supplies. I'm building my new supplies now. I have been reading a lot of Outdoor Gear Lab reviews, I like their reviews, they compare different brands instead of just reviewing one product at a time. That's what lead me to the Polara sleeping bag. They also usually have a budget pick.

u/packtips · 2 pointsr/hiking

Cascade Mountain Tech trekking poles

These are carbon fiber so very lightweight

Cork handles so your sweaty hands grip a little better than foam

Flip lock adjusters = much better than twist lock

You'll get all the differnt ends to put on the bottoms, but unless you are in snow or are hiking on pavement you don't need any end on the pole, you want the hard tip. The big round ends are called snow baskets, you only need them in deep snow. The ones that look like feet are for trekking on flat hard surfaces like a road. The ones that look like stumps are for covering the tips when you are travelling so the tips don't poke things. Look up a few youtube videos on how to use them. Improper use will help you 10%, proper use will help you 100%.

u/canigetuhhhhhhhhhh · 4 pointsr/vandwellers

Hey! I was in that general are too up until recently. I'm no mold expert but I can only suggest my own setup, which may come across as a non-answer, but I don't sleep on a mattress: I sleep on an inflatable air mattress, like for hiking (this one specifically). Super minimalist but for whatever reason I feel comfier than on big real mattresses. I haven't had mold/mildew problems with that inflatable mattress, mainly because…there's no 'inside' really for the mold spores to cling to, and if it gets dirty it's super easy to disinfect the outside of and just wipe down.

If you're a big-bed sort of person, there are definitely bigger (like full-sized) inflatable mattress options out there. I also like mine because with limited space, I can roll it up and stow it every morning and basically have loads of floor space back

So that's an option

u/Orikx · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I do all my riding at night but mostly paved trails. I did a ton of research before buying my lights.

Front:

MagicShine 872 - This is what I use. For Price per lumens you can't beat this thing. It's crazy bright. I have it on 50% most of the time sometimes lower. For distance it's about the same at 50% or 100%. 100% is just much brighter immediately in front of you.


I would actually recommend the MagicShine 808 though. It's a little cheaper and all my research showed the side by side comparisons the 808 actually throws light out a little father. It's just not as bright in the first 25 feet. Since I leave my 872 on 50% it wouldn't matter and I would get a little more distance.

http://www.amazon.com/MagicShine-MJ-808U-Bicycle-Improved-1100-Lumen/dp/B009GSLUR4/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1409954087&sr=8-3&keywords=magicshine+872

Both have an external battery pack and don't use a USB charger though. Which for some people is a problem. I don't mind strapping the battery to my top tube.

Edit to add: Neither of these has a flashing or pulse feature. They do have an adjustable brightness level though. 872 has last for roughly 2 hours for me at 100%. The power buttons illuminate to give you a rough estimate of battery level. After a 2 hour ride with it on 50% the entire time it will show that it has more then 50% left. They say it will last 3 hours at 100% but reviews I read said it last 2 1/2 at 100% then dropped its self down the 75% then 50 > so on until it completely died at 6 hours. I've not actually done that myself though.

Rear:

I use Light & Motion Vis 180 - This thing is ridiculously bright and I love it. Full 180 degrees of visibility from the amber lights. It's very expensive though for a taillight.

http://www.amazon.com/Light-Motion-Tail-Silver-Moon/dp/B00LH1W9AU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=undefined&sr=8-1&keywords=light+and+motion+180

My research pointed to Cygolite Hotshot 2W USB being the best bang for your buck. I would have bought this but my LBS didn't carry it and I needed something that night for riding so i got the Light and Motion.

http://www.amazon.com/Cygolite-Hotshot-2-Watt-Rechargeable-Taillight/dp/B005DVA57Y/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1409954733&sr=8-1&keywords=Cygolite+Hotshot+2W+USB


Hope this helps.

u/pokemeng · 4 pointsr/bicycling

your price is just about right for shoes + pedals. Most new bikes dont come with a pedal so unless you know otherwise about the bike you are getting you will probably need to purchase a pedal and if you are purchasing pedals you might as well purchase shoes :] right? if you give a cyclist a bike, hell want pedals, if you give him pedals, hell want shoes... :P Also im a big fan of just splurging on what you can and enjoying the full package. This is all dependent though on your budget.

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO

this is the pedal i ride on my commuter. its a good dual duty pedal and the platform feels solid. Its a bit bulky so i dont ride it on my nice bike but if your planning on clipping in only sometimes i would suggest this one. If you are planning on riding clipped a majority then i would suggest a pedal without the platform.

Here are the differences in clips. (i think they are called the cleat but i am going to continue calling them the clips)

road clip

road clip shoes notice these have 3 holes where you screw the clip into the shoe in a triangular pattern.

spd clip

spd clip on shoe

notice the spd clip is smaller and recessed. This makes the shoe feel more like a normal shoe and you dont notice the clip as much

road v spd, road on left

road v spd clips and pedals

As a late disclaimer, I have never used road clips but this is the information i gathered in the process of purchasing. Road clipped shoes also usually have a stiffer sole, i believe.

As far as your question goes. I cant imagine long rides anymore without being clipped into the bike. You feel and are more attached to your machine. Your pedaling will most likely be more fluid, you can pull the pedals on the upstroke, your feet wont pop off the pedals on hard shifts letting you pedal through the shifts (something i couldnt do so well without clipless), and you have to learn to trust your bike because your stuck in it :]

That said, I did ride without clipless shoes for quite a while and didnt have any problems but if you asked me to go back now i wouldnt do it. I think if you cant swing a set of shoes and pedals right now, you wouldnt die because of it, but i would suggest investing in them if you are looking to be more serious about riding.

I hope this helps your decision and doesnt make things even more confusing :P

heres my setup for reference.

shoes $100

pedals $70

if your not sure how to use them. You slide the front of the clip in and then start pedaling and push the back of the clip in and it will click in. To get out you twist your ankle away from the bike and the clip will pop out. After i get my pedals i always loosen the spring on the pedal to the loosest setting, then tighten to preference. Looser settings will allow you to still twist your foot side to side while clipped in. Also i think spd clips will give you more side to side play than a road clip.

EDIT: i changes the road clip picture, it was a bit confusing before

u/aminalbackwards · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

I stole the whole setup design from a friend, just a bladder and a filter.

https://www.amazon.com/Geigerrig-G2-070-0Z-p4-Hydration/dp/B00870DGDS

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2?psc=1

The pump adds air to a separate compartment to pressurize the water reservoir and lets you fill cups/pots with water straight from the mouthpiece, without it you would have to carry the extra Sawyer squeeze bag. Only thing I would change is using a bigger sawyer filter, this one flows pretty slow (maybe buy the geigerrig filter instead). The geigerrig is a really awesome piece of equipment though; super easy to fill and really durable.

u/voodoodollbaby · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

You look pretty solid, honestly.

How much night hiking do you do? Are you sure you need the headlamp? You could probably get away with something like this. It's the one I use, weighs like 9g

Also, how attached are you to your jetboil? Have you tried the BSR? Only weighs 25g, uses the same fuel. Your pot should fit as well.

u/SkippyMGee · 5 pointsr/HikingAlberta

This time of year you can get away with a cheaper -4C sleeping bag, but if you have a little extra coin, get a better one.

A compression sack for the sleeping bag.

These are good mattresses.

Bring a light coat. This can double up as a pillow at night.

If you plan on cooking anything, a pocket stove and a fuel canister, and a 1L stainless steep pot. Spoon or fork (I just cook dehydrated food).

A tent with a fly.

Headlamp.

Bear spray and small air horn.

A few pairs of socks and underwear.

Baby wipes.

Ziplocks for trash. Toilet paper. Ideally a bear canister.

Toque, long johns, pair of sandals.

Food.

50' of parachord.

Light clothes that are NOT cotton.

Cook a very decent distance away from your tenting area, and clean a good distance away from your tenting area. Avoid strong smelling food. Know what a bear hang is and learn how to use it if it's available.

u/_OldBay · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

I'm going to post a link to my gear that I have. Everything in the picture is about $800 total

https://www.reddit.com/r/CampingGear/comments/arck5m/2019_gear/

Definitely shop around for sales. The Gregory backpack in my post, I was able to find it for $130 online and then they had a first time 20% discount that I applied, ended up getting it for $106 after S&H. That was with Campmor.com.

You definitely don't need to spend a lot on a water filter system. Most people here and in r/ultralight will swear by the Sawyer Squeeze. It's about $30, not really going to find it cheaper elsewhere unfortunately, trust me I tried. Tablets would probably work just fine to be honest, especially in the Smokey's. I did an Outward Bound 14 day backpacking trip in Pisgah which is next door to it and we only used iodine.

My sleeping bag in my post, normal MSRP was $340. I got it for $170 at an REI garage sale in Dacemeber. Saved a lot of money there.

For a sleeping pad, really depends on if you're a side sleeper or not. If you sleep on your side, you do not want to get a closed cell foam pad, which is that one's you mentioned earlier about people using them down to their butts. Personally I have the REI Flash insulated and it's comfortable and not too expensive. Another popular pad here and on r/ultralight is the Klymit Static-V insulated which is about $90.

For trekking poles, personally I would absolutely invest in a pair. Especially in the Smokey's, the terrain isn't always forgiving when you're carrying a larger backpack and they'll help with any stream crossings. The one's I have are these. Very cheap, but very durable. Definitely no need to buy $100+ poles.

Definitely keep shopping around though if you find something you like.

u/jrwreno · 2 pointsr/preppers

Write yourself a reminder of how to start a fire with the items within your car:

How to start a fire with your car battery

You know, in case you do not have a cigarette lighter working in your car.


It is REALLY. IMPORTANT. To stay dry. Get a slicker for each member of your family, as well as sturdy, water proof foot gear. If you can get a combo snow coat/water proof whatchmacallit, that is perfect. I personally take all items, and vacuum seal them in ziplock Space bags (including first aid, flashlights, flares, everything, to ensure they are protected from moisture before being placed into the duffle bag)

Handwarmers. A buttload of handwarmers. The can last up to 10 hours!


first aid kits, -40 degree sleeping bags, solar rechargeable/hand cranking latterns/flashlights, a simple manual on field survival (scavenging for food, simple traps, signaling for help, a small sum of money in case you need to purchase gas/towing/food, flares, freeze dried, high calorie foods (nuts work amazing))

Water. I am a bit miffed at the person that said he does not store water, but carries a water filter. ALWAYS. CARRY. WATER. A 24 pack of water bottles in the trunk with the tire is good, or a few liter bottles with some air space for expansion. Having a water filter does nothing if you do not have a source for water, or the means to melt snow/ice. Get a water filter as something supplementary. Pack a cheap multi tool and a good knife as well.

A fire starter (flint) and some simple kindling(a sandwich baggie of cotton balls) added tip--coat your cotton balls partially in vaseline, it will increase the flammability of the cotton, and help repel water.


Something I also include, is a pair of foot long 2x4 pieces. I name them the 'clackers'. Smacking 2x4's together is akin to a gun shot, and will get the attention of someone if you do the typical SOS morse code pattern. They also scare away wildlife. Although I always travel armed.

A typical portable jump starting battery
You can often find these little systems with ports which can charge your phone.

A tarp or tent in case your car is compromised and cannot provide adequate shelter

Maps, both local and national (in case you travel) and a compass.

A simple dig out kit for getting your car free (shovel, kitty litter, or a tin can and candle trick, ropes, tire chains, etc)

u/csulildude · 3 pointsr/Watches

I don't think this is what you wanted exactly but… I would recommend all 4. Seiko and citizen are two great watch companies for the price point. My one other recommendation is for the orient mako Black, Blue, Amazon search for other colors. That said to help make a decision you should ask yourself a few questions.

Do you want an automatic or quartz?

What size watch do you want? (How big are your wrists?)

Which one do you like the best?

u/whatisthis147 · 0 pointsr/malefashionadvice

No, that's not what you're looking for. The only reason you'd get a Timex is because you want to save money, right? If you're willing to put in extra money for a watch band, you should just get a better watch altogether. There is no point in upgrading a Timex; it's like getting getting a new paint job for your busted pickup instead of getting a nice sedan. These are some great alternatives. 1 2 3 This site is pretty good for cheap straps.

u/thisdigitalhome-com · 1 pointr/boostedboards

I'm in exactly the same boat. After trying out various long boards like kryptonics dropdown and a couple others, I found the Quest Super Cruiser Longboard the easiest to ride. It is Very stable. I have the kryptonics as well and a regular skateboard too. I find myself just using the Quest board all the time.

Very stable. Long and wide enough so I feel pretty easy to maintain balance when pushing.

u/forrey · 2 pointsr/Israel

In that case, I'd recommend going as light-weight as you can. A set like the one in the photo will be fine for car camping, but too heavy for backpacking, especially multi-day. Here's what I take when backpacking:

Toaks titanium 700ml pot

BRS ultralight gas stove

Toaks titanium folding spork

And a 4 or 8oz gas canister like this one, depending on how long I'll be going for. Don't get the gas canisters online though, get them at a camping or outdoors store, they'll be cheaper.

Honestly, that's all I need for solo backpacking. If you're backpacking with other people, you would maybe need a bigger pot (like 800 or 900ml), but I prefer to use the smaller one and make batches of food if need be. If I'm going car camping, I can bring more stuff as needed (cups, mugs, bowls, etc).

You don't need to get the exact items I have, but basically just ask for a simple, ideally ultralight gas canister stove, cooking pot (ideally titanium, not stainless steel), and a lightweight spork.

I also don't think you need tupperware unless you're car camping. When I backpack, I bring primarily dried foods that require not much cooking (asian style noodles, oatmeal, couscous, etc), and augment with some packaged tuna or chicken (in a bag, not a can) and spices. You can browse through /r/trailmeals for inspiration on cooking while camping.

u/oO0-__-0Oo · 5 pointsr/CCW

Depending on your location and school, having a gun in your dorm may not be illegal, but merely against the university rules.

If you are going to leave the firearm in your car, I suggest you disassemble it and take the complete upper (slide, barrel and recoil spring assembly) with you. Those components are not considered a firearm, and it leaves the receiver in your vehicle much less valuable a target for theft.

As for securing it in your vehicle, cheapest and most effective option is running a quality U-lock through the mag well and attaching it to a car seat frame (leave it underneath the seat).

This is a good U-lock:

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1417384536&sr=8-2&keywords=u+lock

u/zair33ka · 1 pointr/bicycling

I am wrong and you are right, but the market is still dominated primarily by two types: SPD and SPD-SL. OP, I still recommend you do your own google research and LBS research because everyone has different preferences on pedals and cleats. I ride SPD on my road bikes, yet these are considered mountain bike pedals. Talk to someone at your LBS. As far as cost (and the reason I ride SPD), these are some of the most affordable/cost effective pedals on the market. If you are new to clipping in, you can get nice mountain bike style shoes that will allow you to walk around comfortably also. Also, I apologize, I didn't intend to sound condescending, but I do think a google search will give you more info faster than reddit.

u/Uvula_Fetish · 3 pointsr/milwaukee

Anything mid-range is fine. Ultimately, unless you want to lug a 20lb chain around, any sort of U-Lock or mid-range chain lock is sufficient for temporary lock-ups.

https://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1496868581&sr=8-3&keywords=kryptonite+u-lock

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PUCSV7C/ref=s9u_simh_gw_i1?ie=UTF8&fpl=fresh&pd_rd_i=B00PUCSV7C&pd_rd_r=FZPWAHQ8MTTBST4PJ2P0&pd_rd_w=ngc6h&pd_rd_wg=RU5PQ&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=&pf_rd_r=C0QCXJ2M8NZ33CV8HY47&pf_rd_t=36701&pf_rd_p=781f4767-b4d4-466b-8c26-2639359664eb&pf_rd_i=desktop

I've used both of the above at places like Bradford Beach, restaurants downtown, and Bay View on pretty nice bikes without ever having a problem. Make sure you lock up your front wheel as well, I see a ton of pretty average bikes sitting there without front wheels cuz somebody just used the quick-release and walked off with it.

u/Zooshooter · 2 pointsr/camping

I have gear for backpacking. To wit, this includes the following:

sleeping bag

tent

hammock - the explorer deluxe asym zip model

Nova stove

Venom stove

Cheap Amazon stove

Coleman stove - for camping with the gf

Small, field serviceable water filter

Backup, Fire, Starters

An emergency blanket or two

An RD7 knife, which I can't link because I'm at work and it's filtered...
A folding pruning saw that you can buy at any hardware store, I think mine was $7
For a cook kit, I have nylon forks and spoons, a soup can to cook in(the venom stove fits inside it perfectly), if the gf is coming with I bring this cooking kit instead to go along with the big Coleman stove.

With my hammock, I bring what's called an underquilt. I can't link you to this because I made it myself, but it's two sheets of nylon material with mesh fabric sewn in between to make box tubes, then the box tubes are stuffed with goose down and the blanket is sewn shut. It's extremely light, fairly warm, and I tie it up to the bottom of my hammock to keep my backside warm in weather below 65F. In a pinch I can add one of my emergency blankets between the hammock and underquilt for extra warmth.

I also bring headlamps that have a red led and a white "high power" led. No flashlights or lanterns for me, they're too bright. I have a small, brightly colored dry bag that is full of first aid stuff and an assortment of odds & ends in my backpack's top pocket.

I also bring an old 35mm film canister with 6 dice inside and a tape-laminated copy of the rules for playing Farkle. With the 6 dice you could also play Yahtzee or several other dice games.

u/The-Dire-Wolf · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

Probably not, unless you have something to insulate you from the ground. You need a sleeping pad, and not just a regular air mattress. Something that is specifically designed to keep you warm when sleeping on the cold ground. Sleeping pads are usually rated by an "r-value". The higher the "r-value", the warmer it should keep you. There are cheap foam pads to very expensive inflatable pads. Doesn't look like you're form the US, so I am not sure how hard it would be to get your hands on a Klymit Insulated Static V, but they're pretty affordable, comfortable, and warm. They're not great for backpacking but they are great for car camping.

u/dnietz · 2 pointsr/Survival

I have two Leatherman tools. I have used them for over a decade and have never had any trouble with them. They are easy to sharpen and they don't have a single dot of rust on them. Every tool is going to have its limits. I wouldn't use the knife on a Leatherman as a crow bar. I have never heard anyone complain about their Leatherman.

I have seen many people complain about the Sven Saw. It seems to be high quality and the design is very convenient. However, because of its triangular design, it actually can only cut smaller branches. Perhaps you aren't intending to cut a 6 inch limb. Just know that anything thicker than probably 3 inches is probably a big pain to cut with the Sven. Also, from what I understand, the Sven Saw only takes Sven Saw Blades, which is an added inconvenience and expense.

I have a basic cheap bow saw (one piece, non foldable) that I think works great. Bonus is that you can, if needed, use it with standard hack saw blades.

I don't currently own a Mora knife, but they do seem to be universally loved. Please note however that there are several Mora knives that range from $8 to $18 (both stainless and non-stainless). They don't seem to be substantially different from the one you mentioned that is $65.

This is the Mora Bushcraft Survival knife you mentioned ($65):

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Bushcraft-Survival-Stainless-Steel/dp/B005CAPU80


Different Mora knives are either non-stainless carbon steel or stainless. Also, the thickness of the blade varies. You can get the thicker stainless steel knife in the cheaper model ($14):

http://www.amazon.com/Lime-Green-Mora-Companion-Knife/dp/B00BU9ATS8/ref=pd_sim_sg_12

I'm sure you can find one without a lime green handle. There seem to be a thousand models of Mora knives.

Another example, slightly thinner but still stainless ($11):

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Stainless-Steel-Camo-Knife/dp/B005K994QM/ref=pd_sim_sg_11

This one is not stainless but the steel is even thicker than the one you mentioned ($40) if durability is your priority:

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Bushcraft-Sandvik-Stainless-4-3-Inch/dp/B009O01H0Y/ref=pd_sim_sg_9

This last one is almost exactly the same as the knife you mentioned, except that it is $17 instead of $65:

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004ZAIXSC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376873143&sr=8-1&keywords=mora+knife+stainless+steel

Perhaps the price of the one you mentioned is inflated because of the sheath, but the reviews rate that sheath badly. They mention the clip disconnecting unexpectedly and also it does seem like the sharpening stone and the fire steel to be a bit of a gimmick. Fire steels are like $3 at Walmart and maybe $5 if you want the bigger military style model. The sharpening stone attached to the sheath seems to be toy like and not really functional.


Another one that seems to be the same as yours without the gimmicky sheath ($38):

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Bushcraft-Outdoor-Stainless-4-3-Inch/dp/B003FYJU9A/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1376873143&sr=8-12&keywords=mora+knife+stainless+steel

There seems to be a huge variation of prices on Mora knives. The best ones seem to be the ones that are Stainless Steel and the thickness is around 0.1 or 0.098 inches.

I already own several high quality expensive knives, so I don't have a need to purchase the $65 range Mora knife. But the ones that are around $11 seem to be a great deal to use in situations where I might want to avoid damaging my expensive knife.

My favorite to purchase cheaply right now is:

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Stainless-Steel-Camo-Knife/dp/B005K994QM/ref=pd_sim_sg_11

Because it has the hook at the front of the grip, which will help prevent your hands from slipping on to the cutting edge if you have to push into something. I think in survival situations, you hands may be tired, shaky, wet and dirty, which might make them prone to slipping. And of course, a survival situation is the absolute worst time to cut your hand.

Those are my 8 cents worth of contribution.

u/MrMustachio · 4 pointsr/ucf

That's awesome! You're definitely free to come by shop hours and ask advice and use the tools there. We've got all the bike tools you'd need for sure.

I'm sure if you post the picture on our Facebook page you'd get lots of helpful suggestions. To start you off, I'll recommend an Airzound horn. They're ridiculously loud and refillable with your bike pump.

u/rouselle · 2 pointsr/backpacking

Yes they are off my list because I ended up purchasing them. The pad was the [Klymit Static V](Klymit Static V Lightweight Sleeping Pad, Green/Char Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_kesFxbNDWCCR4) and the bag was the [Teton Trailhead 20](TETON Sports TrailHead 20F Ultralight Sleeping Bag, Orange/Grey https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007JTLKCC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_dgsFxbG1YRZ7S). I wasn't feeling the quality of the Teton bag so I ended up returning that. Never used it on the trail but laying in my bed with it I didn't like the feel of the fabric. That's one thing that I'm going to put more money into. As for the pad though it's awesome. Took my sickly lungs about 20 breaths to blow up but it works well. It definitely doesn't need to be pumped up as tight as an air bed. Good quality item there that o would buy again.

u/theBullMousse · 1 pointr/auburn

Here's a link where I tried my best to give directions to the rope swing. Just explore it.

Also, just my 2 cents, but don't buy an ENO. They're trendy and what not, but they're really over priced and, if you plan on using it for camping or backpacking, not a great option. Head over to /r/hammocks and search around.

I've had an ENO for 2 years and it's too frayed now for me to feel comfortable in it. I treated it as nice as you can treat a piece of outdoor equipment. This is much cheaper and supposed to hold up much better.

u/darthjenni · 2 pointsr/camping

I am old and fat, I like a lot of squish, and most of the time we are camping in the desert.

We have the old version of the Neo Air. It is good for car camping and backpacking. Coupler kit

We also have an old Dreamtime for car camping that has served us well over the years. It has a built in coupler.

This year we upgraded to Exped MegaMat 10 LXW. It is well worth the money. We camp 2+ months out of the year. And this mat should last 7+ years. So for us it is a good investment.

The guys over in /r/CampingGear would get mad if I didn't mention the Klymit Static V. It is dirt cheep compared to everything I have recommended. And they make a Double V

The best thing you can do is go to a store and try them out.

One more thought, if you are car camping you don't need sleeping bags. A set of flannel sheets and a cheep comforter will keep you just as warm.

u/FightGar · 1 pointr/beermoney

Funny. I've been doing swagbucks, amazon turk and paidveiwpoint for a few weeks and planned on getting either an Orient Mako or a Seiko Diver soon. I haven't cashed out in either but I figure I have roughly $120 from doing both with little effort.

That is a very nice watch, hope you enjoy it.

Edit: Here's a look at my earnings so far from mTurk and SwagBucks(Still gotta spend them bucks)

Here's a ref to Swagbucks, nonref

and to PaidViewPoint, nonref

u/Sharkbite0592 · 1 pointr/Watches

The 7K2 would be better in my opinion, it is 3mm bigger than your Invicta so it should fit fine, and the reviews on the 7K2 are better than the reviews on the 9K2 as well.
Also, for $10 more you can get an Orient Black Mako diver watch which has better reviews than both of them, just throwing it out there for you in case you're interested! http://www.amazon.com/Orient-CEM65001B-Black-Automatic-Watch/dp/B001EWEQ3A/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1416272316&sr=8-1&keywords=Orient+Mako

u/Graybealz · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

Here is a great little stove. It's a Chinese whisperlight, but I've been using it quite a bit over the past 2 years and have no complaints whatsoever. Also super cheap, which gives you more money to play with.

The Sawyer mini squeeze is also a great item to have. You should have $20-25 left after these two items.

Here's a decent magnesium fire starter for cheap as well.

With these items, all essential/survival items, you should have about $15-20 to play with. Maybe some socks?

u/wesinator · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Try these cascade mountain tech poles. I have them and love them. I've put them through a couple hundred miles and accidentally stepped on them a couple times and seem to be doing great. Pretty light weight (about 8 oz per pole). I love the long cork/ foarm handles and straps. My only beef is that the tip covers fell off somewhere when hiking. But I've heard people bought them for as low as 28 dollars at costco in the northwest. When I find them at costco I'm going to get 4 or 5 pairs and give em out to friends they are so good.

u/nerex · 1 pointr/Hammocks

yeah, if you're not even sure you'll like sleeping in a hammock, a cheap one is the way to go- I have this $19 Grand Trunk Hammock

http://www.amazon.com/Grand-Trunk-Ultralight-Hammock-Forrest/dp/B001AIHB76

though it doesn't come with a suspension. A quick way to make one is to get ~16 feet of 1" nylon webbing, cut it into 2 pieces, tie loops at the ends with overhand knots, then on each tree, loop one end through the other end (of the same length of webbing), then hook the metal loop of the GT ultralight to the end of the webbing reaching from the tree. then do the same with the other 8 foot length on the opposite tree.

if you can get even a half-decent night of sleep in that (provided you are warm enough, etc- summer is the best time to try it out), you will probably love sleeping in a hammock while camping.

u/zerostyle · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

A few items that look heavy:

  • compressible pillow @ 9oz is super heavy, but if it's the only thing that will help you sleep that's ok (-6oz for inflatable)
  • could use a BRS stove that's lighter, but the pocket rocket is fine (-2oz)
  • could go to a smaller power bank (6700mAh around 4oz) to save 2oz or so

    Also, as I reiterate to everyone, lyme disease is VERY rampant in the northeast. Don't by shy about packing more DEET or picaridin. Soak all of your clothes in permethrin before the trip, particularly socks.
u/bsarocker · 6 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

the model you linked is not only super heavy, but I doubt would get you near comfortable. you will also need to pair either bag with matching r value ground insulation. for instance a pad like this
https://www.amazon.ca/KLYMIT-Insulated-Static-Camping-Orange/dp/B00ANRW7DI/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1494229667&sr=1-1&keywords=klymit+insulated+static+v THis is a huge mistake many people make. The ground insulation is paramount.

The model below is a better option.

https://www.amazon.ca/Sports-TrailHead-Ultralight-Sleeping-Orange/dp/B007JTLKCC/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1494229515&sr=1-1&keywords=teton+sleeping+bag

It's also better to NOT compress your bag. Line your pack with a trash compactor bag, push the sleeping bag into the bottom of your pack. Not in a stuff sack.

https://youtu.be/J1UZvwPnA_o

u/phirebug · 3 pointsr/camping

As others have mentioned, it will depend on what kind of camping he likes to do and what he already owns, but here are some of my favorite pieces of gear I've picked up over the years:
This little guy is a pretty good rechargeable lantern/flashlight with magnets so you can stick it to stuff and a usb output so you can charge other things with it.

I've had one of these for YEARS and I just lost it the other day. There was $200 worth of gear in the pannier that fell off my bike and I'm more pissed about that cup than the rest of the gear combined. It looks like they made it a little taller, which I do not like, but he may. There are several other brands that make something similar in both steel or titanium. It's not just a cup though...it will slip perfectly over the bottom of a nalgene, you can cook directly on a stove or fire with it, and you can pair it with the smaller jetboil coffee press or the guts of a standard bodum press and turn it into a french press. It's the exact same diameter.
A Sawyer can be an AMAZING if you're going to be anywhere long enough to pack water in. The squeeze bag it comes with sucks, but it has standard bottle threads, so you can screw it into a 2-liter bottle with the bottom cut off and it turns it into a gravity filter. Just pour more river/lake water into the 2 liter every minute or so and it will keep pouring clean water into your bottles. Also, you notice the weird skinny part in the middle? It's exactly the width of duct tape. You can wrap several yards of it around there.
EDIT: forgot some words

u/meg_c · 2 pointsr/hammockcamping

If you go for trekking poles, I can recommend this set: Cascade Mountain Tech Carbon Fiber Quick Lock Trekking Poles. They're great, especially for the price :) I've got a set with the foam handles, and they're still going strong after a couple of years :)

u/gitterwibbit · 2 pointsr/longboarding

Thanks for your input, but I'm really not looking to learn all of this stuff. I really just want to get a decent board online or somethin', fully setup, and be done. Sorry if I sound ignorant, but I just wanna get somethin' good and be done.

I'm thinking of picking up one out of these:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008EZNY4W/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NR4MCUW/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B008EZNYOW/ref=dp_olp_used?ie=UTF8&condition=used

Which would ya say is the best in terms of durability, stability, and handling. I'm really looking for something that can make swift turns, pick up speed, and be stable.

Sorry that I'm incredibly uninformed on how all this works. But I really just wanna pick up a solid, decent board that can do those things.

Also, my neighborhood has some rocky, bad roads, sometimes. Sometimes its solid, sometimes its jagged. Which one of those boards above can keep up with it while still being stable?

If those can't do the job, could you link something that could thats >100$?

u/dmoney247 · 4 pointsr/aves

Buy some hot hands they work miracles. I remember someone last year gave me one for my wife and I definitely made the cold bearable and they're pretty cheap for big pack maybe you can pass them out like I will be doing!!
HotHands Hand Warmers 40 Pair Value Pack https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0007ZF4OA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_vq2hAb1GVX2GY

u/lindymad · 3 pointsr/AskNOLA

One of the things I like most about living here is not needing a car. There are certainly some places I avoid biking to/through, especially at night, out of concern for my safety. If I need to go there, I just use lyft, or get a ride from a friend.

Someone else mentioned that there are no bike lanes - this is not true. There are bike lanes on some roads, but not as many as I personally would like. That said, there are a lot of pretty narrow streets, especially in the quarter/marigny/bywater that simply don't have room for bike lanes.

One recommendation I would make is to get a bike airhorn for the moments when drivers aren't paying attention/don't care about bicyclists/aren't exactly sober, which seems to happen a lot here. This has saved me on quite a few occassions.