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Reddit reviews: The best sports & outdoors

We found 97,547 Reddit comments discussing the best sports & outdoors. We ran sentiment analysis on each of these comments to determine how redditors feel about different products. We found 46,109 products and ranked them based on the amount of positive reactions they received. Here are the top 20.

Top Reddit comments about Sports & Outdoors:

u/cwcoleman · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

It's Monday and I'm bored at work... so... here are links to all OP's items. It's a great list and this may give other CaH'ers more insight into what OP is carrying. Plus my random comments...

u/zxj4k3xz · 5 pointsr/airsoft

A rifle: I personally suggest the Classic Army KM10, but the KM12, Delta 10/12, EC1/2, and ISSC MK22 are exactly the same internally. G&G Combat Machines, like a G&G CM18 are also very nice and popular starter guns.

Extra mags: My personal favorite are G&P High RPS. They're pretty tight in most guns but are well priced, look nice, and feed well. They fit well in Combat Machines, but I've never tested with Classic Army. Some others that fit in Combat Machines, and probably Classic Army, are Ares Ameobas and PTS EPMs. For mid-caps you'll need a speedloader. For high caps, it's not needed.

Battery: I'd suggest a 7.4v Lipo or 9.6v nimh. If you're going Lipo, buy from Hobbyking. They sell decent batteries for cheap. I'm not sure the exact dimensions of the stock each uses, but this 7.4v 2000mah 15-25c would probably fit in both and run them fine. It has a huge capacity so it'll last a while. For a charger, the Imax B6 will do everything you need it to (Charge, discharge, some other stuff) and the price isn't bad. I'd also suggest a Voltage checker for Lipos. The Classic Armys will come with a 9.6v nimh and a shitty charger. For those, just get a new smart charger. The G&Gs have a battery bundle that'll give you a 9.6v nimh and smart charger.

Head protection: For eyepro, I love Pyramex. Pyramex I-force are my personal favorite, and the V2G-XP are very good as well. They're also rebranded by Valken and are known as Valken Zulus and Sierras. The One Tigris mesh mask is by far the best lower face protection I've used. Hard cover where you need it (teeth, nose, lips) and still covers your cheeks. It's also very comfy and lets you get good cheek weld, so you can see down your sights easily. I also wear a hat and Howard Leight impact sports

Gloves: Hand shots hurt. A lot. Some nice gloves like Mechanix M-pacts are a god-send in game.

chest rig: If you want to carry extra mags, the Condor Rapid Assualt is a nice and cheap way to carry them. 6 M4 mag pouches and a lot of MOLLE to attach other pouches. It's also super adjustable and can fit almost every body type.

BBs: I almost exclusively use Elite Force .28g Bio. They're just the best BBs I've used and aren't crazy expensive. You'll have to find a weight that's best for you (Maybe buy a sample pack?) but .28s are generally best in stock guns.

Camo isn't that important, but I love my LBX Combat Uniform. The shirt uses a thin-ish material in the chest and back which is great if you're using a plate carrier or chest rig, while the arms, and pants, are made of a thick material that really takes away the sting of BBs, but still leaves enough that you can feel hits. I also like having an outfit specifically for airsoft. The pants also fit knee pad inserts. All that being said, jeans and a hoodie are perfectly fine.

u/Arimil · 7 pointsr/CampingGear
  1. Tent: Eagles Peak II Two person tent - http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/product/index.jsp?productId=50802926
    -This was generous gift from my SO's mom. It may not be the best tent out there, but at free it can't be beat.

  2. Sleeping Bag: Marmot Aspen Minimalist 40 - http://www.trailspace.com/gear/marmot/aspen-40-ultralight/
    -Got this for its small size and light weight. Future winter camping trips are a possibility, in which case I plan on snagging a wool blanket of sleeping bag liner.

  3. Sleeping Pad: RidgeRest Classic - http://www.amazon.com/Therm-A-Rest-6433-Parent-RidgeRest-Classic-Mattress/dp/B00HZ13OYG
    -Simple basic sleeping pad, I've been using these since scouts and have wanted for nothing more, especially because of its light weight.
    -In the event of winter camping, is this enough to insulate from the ground? If not, what could be added to my sleep system to keep me insulated from the ground?

  4. Cookware: Pot Pan stackable combo - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FQZEYWE?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00
    -Lightweight and simple, these were cheap and seemed straight forward.
    -They stack with the majority of either piece's empty space facing each other, allowing for decently dry storage for matches etc. inside.
    -Comes with a tight fitting mesh ditty bag

  5. Small Camp Grill - Coghlan's Camp Grill - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001OPHA0S?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00
    -Another straight forward and cheap piece,
    -This is really an optional piece, I plan on bringing it along on trips with big groups or when cooking meat is in the cards.

  6. Plates x2: Coleman Enamel plates - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0009PUSPI?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00
    -These are the camping gold standard in my book, been using them since scouts.

  7. Stuff Sacks x3: REI pack of 3 Ditty Sacks 2, 3, and 7 liter. -http://www.rei.com/product/795047/rei-ditty-sack-package-of-3
    -Came in a decently affordable combo pack, plan on using them for food/toiletries storage and bear bags.

  8. Knife: Morakniv Companion Straight Knife - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004TNWD40?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00
    -Love this little knife, cheap but durable and was a shaver straight out of the box.
    -Came with a super thick plastic sheath

    9)Hatchet: Estwing Hatchet - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004TNWD40?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00
    -Heard this was a classic, people say they've still got the one's their grandfather's used. It's heavy, but I'm happy with the tradeoff.
    -Got it sharpened well enough to cleanly slice through paper at the moment

  9. Axe Sharpener: Lansky Dual Grit Sharpener - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000B8FW0Y?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00
    -Great sharpener, pretty much the go to field sharpener from what I've gathered.
    -Only took a couple minutes to learn how to use, the only hard part is consistently following the bevel through each stroke, but it gets easier.

  10. Camp Towels x2: Microfiber quick-drying towels - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000B8FW0Y?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00
    -Very great, medium size towels with their own tote

  11. Collapsible Water Jug: REI 2.5 gallon collapsible water jug - http://www.rei.com/product/402099/reliance-fold-a-carrier-water-carrier-25-gal
    -Seems great, picked it up at REI physical store then read reviews and got spooked, we'll see though, a minority of the reviewers swear by it.
    -Just in case it sucks, any suggestions for a collapsible water container of equal size/price?

  12. Water Bags x2: 33 oz Bag style canteens - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B010OLZ3E2?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00
    -These came free with my water filter, and they have many good reviews. If they do well, I may buy some extras.

  13. Wine Skin: 2L - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CN4RN42?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00
    -More showing of my primitivist ass, and I thought I could take some weight off of my SO by carrying enough water for the two of us.

  14. Pillows x2: Field and Stream - http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/product/index.jsp?productId=33581126
    -Got these a long time ago when I knew less, they are pretty bulky and my first item I want to replace

  15. Pack: Kelty Redwing 50L Black
    -SO's mom gifted this this Christmas, so amazing and thoughtful, one of the best gifts I've ever gotten and I love the color

  16. Shoes: Skechers Trail Runners - I found these at the thrift store for a stunning 12 bucks and they fit perfectly

  17. Lighting: Outlite Lantern -http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01178FLM0?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00
    -Pack of flashlights (might not bring all four) - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00V639BNC?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s01

  18. Extras: Tarp as groundcloth, some extra stakes.

    Items not shown:
    -Always a tin or bag of Drum Tobacco and papers
    -Kindle, old generation one
    -Collapsible trowel
    -Paracord
    -Burlap shoulder bag for gathering kindling etc

    Items still wanted (suggestions greatly appreciated):
    -Knife for SO
    -Work gloves
    -Plastic flasks for booze
    -Belt pouch
    -Higher quality tarp
    -Knife Sharpener
    -Sleeping bag liner or wool blanket
    -Any food suggestions!
    -Rain cover for pack
    -Smell proof food bags

    I don't have much experience outside of scouts, so I'm very open to critique of my setup. I will warn that I am very much into primitivism, and camping for me is a gateway to a backcountry, esthetic lifestyle I one day I hope to live, so some of my gear choices may not always be the most efficient. Any advice from a primitivist or purist standpoint is doubly appreciated.

u/Maximum_Ordinate · 3 pointsr/Hunting

Buy yourself a decent bolt action .22 or a shotgun, a good 3-5" fixed blade knife, a blaze orange hat or vest, and a decent little first aid kit (don't forget a tourniquet).


Step 1: Take a hunters safety/education class.

Some states have classes exclusively for adults. This will give you some basic, but good info on gun/bow safety and state laws pertaining to hunting. In addition, they should have pamphlets that will outline the different hunting seasons, game animals, invasive species, and state/federal hunting areas.

These classes might also help you meet some more experienced folks who could bring you along or offer some valuable advice.


Step 2: Learn how to use your gear.

Your ability with your gear can mean the difference between success and failure on the hunt--and in some cases life and death (especially pertaining to your med kit).

Let's start with the rifle. I like bolt action .22's. You can get a very accurate gun and learn how to use it for very little money. Using a bolt action .22 with iron sights forces the shooter to learn the fundamentals of marksmanship, building a solid foundation for the future.

I like the Savage MkII and the Ruger American.

With either rifle I'd recommend adding a peep sight and a regular 2 point sling.
Both are accurate and inexpensive rifles that you can shoot day in and day out for years.

You should be able to find a range with at least 50 yards to sight in (aka zero) your rifle. If you need guidance here, there are plenty of online resources, however, you'd do better to ask an experienced shooter for a hand. Be sure to use the same ammo for zero and hunting.

For shotguns you can't beat the versatility of a Remington 870 or Mossberg 500. Get either gun in 12 or 20 gauge. The beauty of these two is that you are always a simple barrel change away from being able to shoot birdshot (birds small game) or slugs (everything else).

With a good .22 and a good shotgun, you should be able to hunt most wild game in North America. There are better calibers and rifles for specific hunting applications but those two will do it all.

What I don't recommend for hunting rifles/shotguns and why:

1 I don't like scopes (at first). Forcing yourself to learn on iron sights means you develop a firm foundation in the fundamentals. I remember wanting a scope for my .22 so bad, so my dad made me a deal. I had to kill 100 red squirrels or starlings and 10 groundhogs before he'd let me add a scope. It took me the better part of a summer to accomplish this but I walked away from that summer being able to put lead on just about anything within 150 yards of that little rifle.

2 I don't like autoloaders (at first). Simply because shooting a bolt gun means you have one, maybe two shots to get the job done. You learn to make ever shot count. Once you are proficient, go wild.

3 I don't like tactical/tacticool rifles for beginners or really hunting for that matter. They are usuallly auto loaders (see #2), heavier, and more expensive. You don't feel so bad taking your $230 Savage through brambles, tripping over roots and dropping it, or leaning it up against a rusty fence post. If you don't trust me, look at what the professional hunters use.

Extras: buy a quality, brass rod cleaning kit and some decent gun oil (or CLP) for deep cleans. Keep a [Bore Snake](.22 .223 .25 CAL Bore Snake Cleaner Kit Cord Rope Brass https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JKSNVTK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_XRfGzbN7P8Z58) in an extra pocket for the times you get dirt or debris in the barrel.


Get yourself a good knife. I always have my pocket knife (a CRKT M21-02G) and a skinner when I'm hunting.

For a pocket knife use what suits you. For a skinner I really like knives like the Schrade Old Timer 158 for general skinning and this blade from Ontario Knife.

You also need a good way to keep your knives sharp. I've had a lot of luck with the. [Lansky System](Lansky Deluxe 5-Stone Sharpening System https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000B8IEA4/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_85fGzbBRJDH6K).


Last, please get yourself a decent med kit. Too many people have died in the woods due to a knife accident or gun accident that could have been easily treated.

You can easily make yourself a basic kit or buy one like [this](Ever Ready First Aid Meditac Tactical Trauma IFAK Kit with Trauma Pack Quickclot and Israeli Bandage in Molle Pouch https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GAAMS2M/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_iagGzb76NGQZJ) pre-made.

This kit has everything you need except for a tourniquet like [this](Tourniquet - (Black) Recon Medical Gen 3 Mil-Spec Kevlar Metal Windlass Aluminum Lightweight First Aid Tactical Swat Medic Pre-Hospital Life Saving Hemorrhage Control Registration Card (1 Pack) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01ETMVQOI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_fcgGzbSAMKAWS) and an Israeli Bandage like [this](Ever Ready Bandage Battle Dressing First Aid Compression Bandage, 6 Inch https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003DPVERM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_1cgGzb9C9H5WP).

You can learn to use all this stuff over the course of an hour via YouTube. You would do better to find a nurse, paramedic, or Navy Corpsman to give you a crash course in the use of the contents of your IFAK. If you can find a Corpsman, they are probably the best for this kind of thing. Lots of good tips and tricks for field use...plus you can pay them in beer.

Don't forget to add extras like any medication you might need, chapstick, Bayer aspirin (good for headaches and heart attacks), a little tube of antibacterial ointment, and a couple fabric bandages.

If you won't carry this on your person, keep it in your vehicle.

For good practice I like squirrel and rabbit hunting. Makes you consider a lot about safety, a lot about taking only the good shots, plus they are easy to clean and good to eat.


Last learn how to use what you kill.

If you are hunting varmits, that is one thing. I shoot invasive species (when legal), and varmits that are causing a nuisance and that is reason enough for me.

If you are hunting anything else for exclusively for sport, please use it. You can use some of the books referenced earlier to learn about skinning and field dressing. I like to watch shows like Meat Eater, to learn better ways to use the meat I've harvested. Once you get into cooking game meat, you will wonder why you ever went to the store for meat.

Just don't forget that hunting is about stewardship and learning. It's a lifelong pursuit that is very rewarding.

Always be safe, always be ethical, always be responsible, always have fun.

Edit: If you ever find yourself in south central or southwest Michigan, I can help you with anything I've outlined above. I'm a lifelong hunter, a lifelong shooter, a small arms instructor in the military, a certified combat lifesaver, and a decent game cook.

u/defygravty · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

OK, here is a brain dump of whatever comes into my mind. Just hoping to spark your memory so don't get mad if I say a bunch of stuff you already know...

Put all the pieces into a lighterpack.com account and checkout r/Ultralight before you buy (head over there and burn down the sidebar reading list and the incomplete-wiki, it's worth it).

Is that Osprey really 70 L? That's huge. Probably weighs a ton, what are you bringing that fills up 70 L on a 3-5 day summer trip? A 50 L beer keg? Maybe you have some sweet luxury items that take up a lot of space in the pack, but I'd drop the volume on the pack to at least 50 L. If you can manage it, Try a Ultimate Direction Fastpack 30. But if you just can't get your volume that small, get what works. Weight is an issue too, in frameless packs the straps are uncomfortable over 30 lbs, sometimes less. But if you make some smart choices right now, you shouldn't bust 30 lbs. (It's also smart to get the rest of the gear first to get an idea of how much volume you'll need in your pack and if you'll need a frame.)

Research quilt vs sleeping bag. Quilts are big these days unless you are a crazy sleeper. Enlightened Equipment is the shiz. I've bought 4 quilts and made 3 DIY and EE are the best I've tried. EE also sells a synthetic quilt called the prodigy which I use in the summers or as a layer in the winters. I hear that Katabatic quilts are truly the best if the price tag doesn't scare you away. And a super cheap, but quality option though on aliexpress, it's buy at your own risk. Worked for me last time, doesn't mean it will next time.

Massdrop is selling a skinny UL static V (and the insulated verion) right now for cheap. (I own the insulated option and bought it from massdrop.) But there's a lighter not-as-skinny pad called a Thermorest Neoair Xlite. Also the sea to shining sea ultralight pad gets high marks. So look at those, see what other pads are popping on r/ultralight, the balance the weight and costs to your preference. (Assuming you know about r-values and what your needs will be in Maine/Vermont. I'm guessing spring is a little cold so maybe r=~4 in the early spring or high altitude?)

Nemo tents are great. If you're only camping spring/summer I'd get a much lighter weight tarp tent. Like 3 lbs or less including stakes/cords (and footprint if your tent has a bathtub floor).

11-14 oz MSR Whisperlite is awesome. Stoves are pretty personal, it's best to go with one you trust. MSR is probably the right choice for you. I use a tiny 2oz stove and a homemade windscreen. My stove is finicky and too small if you're cooking for 2 or more. However, there's a whole mess of stoves between the 2oz and 14 oz which might still cover you and save you a few ounces or half a pound. Like the Kovea Spider which I also have, and use in the cold (gas liquefies and fuel can must be inverted, so I need a freestanding stove with a tube). I'm personally biased against the jetboil because of how much space it takes in my pack, but I own 2. They are fast, good for groups. Again the MSR is NOT a bad choice.

You also need a cook pot. Titanium is a waste of money, find a cheap Aluminum one for the same results. Like the olicamp ones, or if you want a real lid, you'll have to spend more (the metal lids cost way more for some odd reason).

Water filtration. Everybody ravs over the Sawyer Squeeze and I guess I'm out of the loop having never tried it. Fretting about making sure my filter doesn't freeze seems like a source of anxiety. I'll try it eventually though. I like the hand pump water filters. I rock an MSR hyperflow. And if I'm in a big group, I'll break out my Katadyn 6L Gravity Filter.

Get a down jacket from costco or sams for 20$, if you're camping in it, you'll wear it out so no use spending a ton there. (Down packs small and won't take up nearly any pack space)

Get a headlamp, I prefer blackdiamond or Fenix. For BD this image sums it up very nicely. For fenix there's a variety but I am currently using the HL55 (900 lumens). Again look at the weights, but also look at the battery requirements and the longevity/efficiency. Find what you like.

Ok my brain is dumped. Hopefully I hit on something worth your time. If I were you, I'd go as cheap as possible, then put the savings into funding your travel for hiking or buying a kayak. Random, I know, but having blown tons of money on gear I feel like there's quality for a good price if you look for it. And using the extra money to break into a new hobby opens the door to a potentially mind altering experience. Especially a related hobby like kayaking, fishing, snowshoeing, rock climbing, diving (though this one is lots of money), or whatever's clever.

u/grimgrau · 4 pointsr/bodyweightfitness

Definitely buy yourself a pair of adjustable gymnastics rings. The plastic ones are much less expensive, but when your hands get sweaty they don't have a good grip like the wooden ones. You should get wooden rings if you can, but you can get plastic ones for the time being and later on move to wood if you want to.

>I'm advised to stay away from weights so I shouldn't do lat pulldowns or other things like that (I'm 13, so my mom and other people around reddit say that I need to grow first). Should I still be using dumbbells for squats, and how? Should I do deadlifts?

It's a myth that weights will stunt your growth, so you could always move to free weights in the future if bodyweight training isn't right for you. Bodyweight training is great, though! You could use dumbbells for squats, lunges, and other things if you wanted to, but for now just stick with the recommended routine and follow the squat progression for your legs.

>How do I use the smith machine for rows? I've read around here and r/Fitness that it's great for them, abd I know to put the bar to my waist, but should I put any weight on it or leave it as a blank bar?

Until you get your rings you can definitely use the smith machine for rows. Alternatively you could do dumbbell rows:

  • http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/BackGeneral/DBBentOverRow.html
  • http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/BackGeneral/DBLyingRow.html

    >I tried asking people at the gym about this, they were super nice :) but they suggested I use the lat pulldown machine or some other weird machine where you lift yourself up to bars, but there's a footrest under you that just holds your weight (so I don't feel any exercise happening).

    That seems to work for some people, but it's really better to do pull up or chin up negatives. This is where you boost yourself up by jumping or using a platform to get yourself high enough to grab the bar/rings and lowering yourself down as slowly as you can. The lat pulldown machine is a completely different movement from actual pull ups and chin ups, but if you want to use it that's fine.

    >If you can help and/or leave some advice I'd appreciate that :)

    You really only need to know some basics about bodyweight training in order to do it and get something out of it. You'll learn slowly as you do this for longer. Don't worry about trying to know everything all at once. The most important thing is for you to begin working out and then stick with it. :)

    Feel free to post any other questions that you have in the daily discussion threads that we have here. People who do calisthenics (bodyweight training) tend to be very helpful and this in general is quite a helpful community. We enjoy what we do and when see someone else who wants to get into it we do our best to help that person.

    If you can get your parents to help or you can do chores to try to earn the money slowly you could also get yourself a doorway pull up bar that fits into your door frame. "The Iron Gym" isn't very expensive and it doesn't screw into your door. It uses leverage to hang from the top of the door so you can do pull ups or even hang your gymnastics rings from it. You mentioned that your gym doesn't have any pull up bars so you could do some things at home if you wanted to instead of always needing to go to the gym. You could do part of your routine at home and then finish up at the gym.

    There are knock-off versions of The Iron Gym and they all pretty much work the same. It's not a very expensive piece of equipment but it will let you use your rings at home.
u/Mehue · 5 pointsr/getdisciplined

The "all or nothing" personality is something I struggled with. I recognized it, as you have, but what really made the biggest difference was making it my primary focus. The reason I never seemed to reach my goals, time and time again, was because I burnt out. I was fueling myself with the initial rush of motivation, forgetting that I would soon have to switch fuels to something I wasn't ready for: discipline. So, it's important for us to start small. Have you read "The Hobbit"?

Bilbo Baggins didn't go straight from his comfortable little hobbit hole straight to the Smaug's lair. His first step was simply leaving his hobbit hole, which he never would have done if he knew from the start that he'd be facing a dragon.

So, you need to start small. You have these goals, which are great, but they are the long-term goals. We need to break these things down into small, do-able goals that won't result in burnout. You need to leave your hobbit hole before facing your dragon.

---

You want to start going to the gym, among many other things. Going to the gym involves:

(a) convincing yourself to go to the gym, even on a rainy day or when you're super comfortable at home

(b) getting off your ass, into the car for ~15 minutes, into the gym where you would feel guilty for working out less than 30 minutes since you drove there, driving back home for ~15 minutes

(c) paying for a membership

Is this sustainable right off the bat? Remember, this is about building habits. We want to make this so easy that you will have no problem doing this. So start small and reduce the barriers of entry that will likely burn you out after your 2 weeks of motivational fuel runs out.

I did this simple routine. You can do it at home, it takes 20 minutes max, and all you need is a pullup bar. How much more doable does this sound?:

(a) convince yourself to get off your ass and walk 10ft to your pullup bar

(b) do pullups, pushups, and squats for 10-20 minutes

People may chime in about this program is missing this or that or how barbell squats cured their cousin's cancer. Fuck 'em. Doing something consistently is infintely better than doing the "ideal workout" inconsistently for 4 months before tapering off working out altogether. And guess what? Once you have built the habit of working out and want to go to the gym, you can!

---

You want to keep up with housework. So, using the same principles, start small! I mean so fucking small that you would laugh at yourself if you couldn't even do that. Turn on your favorite song and do housework until that song is over. You aren't obligated to do any more than the length of that song. Sure, you may not have cleaned the entire house, done all of your laundry, and roasted a fucking turkey. But, you may have done the dishes, or at least half of them. Again, something consistently is infinitely better than nothing. And, again, guess what!? Once you have built the habit of doing housework for the length of a song, you can play two songs!

---

You want to be healthier and take better care of yourself. Well, working out and doing some housework certainly falls under this. Let's address healthy eating. Again, we want to make this as simple as possible. Here is what I do that has been working really well:

Toss the following into a pressure cooker:

Meat (Choose 1):

  • Chicken breasts
  • Chicken thighs
  • Pork
  • Turkey

    Veges & stuff (choose 4):

  • Green beans/Asparagus/Cauliflower/Brocolli (choose 1)
  • Mixed greens
  • Mushrooms
  • Carrots
  • Baby potatoes

    Sauce (choose 1):

  • Curry (+ variety to choose from)
  • Salsa (+ variety to choose from)
  • Marinara/Spaghetti/Tomato sauce (+ variety to choose from)

    Seasoning:

  • Garlic
  • Onion

    I don't even cut anything. If anything, I just use my hands to split the green beans, carrots, etc. Again, low barrier of entry. Keep it simple!

    At the same time, on the stove or in a rice cooker, make something to put this all on top of:

  • Brown rice
  • White rice
  • Orzo
  • Quinoa

    It takes about ~30 minutes to make a ton of healthy and tasty food. I do this twice per week.

    For breakfast, I toss 1 cup of oatmeal in a bowl, 2 cups of water in that bowl, cover and microwave it for 4 minutes, and add a tbsp of brown sugar and maybe some peanut butter. Simple, easy, fast, little barrier of entry.

    ---
    ---
    ---

    We've added quite a few (doable!) things for you to work on. You said you want to start studying programming. I would caution you to not start doing that now. You don't want to burn yourself out. Remember, start small, we're building habits here.

    This doesn't mean you won't ever study programming. In fact, what if you start now? What if you burn out in 1 month and don't touch programming again? What if this leads you to stop working out, stop doing housework, stop cooking? It's not worth it.

    So how do you know when you're ready to add studying programming? Read this. Only make 3 cards: workout, housework, cook.

    Once you are done with these 3 cards, you can create a new one for programming. But make sure you follow the same principles of starting small! Only commit yourself to 10 minutes a day. You can always do more, but 10 minutes is success.

    -

    Enjoying this? Looking for another adventure to go on after 7 weeks of programming? Fix your sleep schedule. Make a card for light's out at : pm.

    -

    At this point, we're getting closer to facing Smaug. You want to add another thing? Add meditating. Again, start small! Start with 5 minutes a day, or maybe less! Whatever sounds so doable that there is no way you couldn't do it. I don't give a shit if that means 1 minute per day.

    ---

    Don't feel bad if you don't fill out these cards perfectly. Remember, something is better than nothing. If you only have an X for half of those days, you've still improved yourself enormously.

    There will be fuck-ups. Bilbo fucked up, but he still got to Smaug's lair. Use your fuck-ups. Fucking abuse those fuck-ups. When you fuck-up (which you will, it's part of the process), make it a point to learn from it. Make yourself glad you did it. Didn't workout today? Do something you otherwise wouldn't have done that day: maybe go for a short 5 minute walk, or call your mother to tell her you love her, or send an email to your favorite band or author and thank them for existing, or read a short story on /r/writingprompts, or write a haiku, or tell yourself you're fucking awesome. It doesn't have to be big, but I guarentee it will be worth doing.



    Remember, the first step is coming out of your hobbit hole. There will be many, many challenges along the way. You might have to fight some spiders in Mirkwood, you might have to get in some barrels to escape some wood-elves, you might find a ring. Your life is a book, you aren't going to go directly from your hobbit hole to Smaug's lair. Along your journey, you likely won't even be thinking about Smaug's lair, because you should be focusing on the present, your 3 minute dishwashing session, your 10 minute workout. There will be a point you will look back and see how far you are from your hobbit hole. Before you know it, you'll be standing in front of a dragon's lair and realizing that back in your hobbit hole, you never in 100 years would have expected to be standing right there.



    Now go take your first step toward becoming Bilbo.
u/howiegroove · 2 pointsr/progresspics

Here are a couple products that look good and have good reviews. I have had friends use these when they go out of town for business. The deal is, you can combine the bands to get more resistance. So you would hold a red AND yellow at the same time and its much more difficult to lift. You can literally do just about every excersize with these. Squats, deadlifts, bench press, curl, back exercises, just about anything. Of course, nothing beats old fashioned iron, but this will get you going.

Other than these, try to get in cardio in some way. The best way to get in cardio in a short amount of time. HIIT is great. 20-25 minutes is the equivalent of 60 minutes of regular training.

Here is an excerpt from bodybuilding.com (which I posted the link to the article below as well...


> BEGINNER'S LAYOUT
Minutes 1-4 (Warm-Up)
Jog at about 50% effort
Minute 5 (Workout Interval 1)
Sprint 30 seconds at maximum effort Jog/Walk 30 seconds
Minute 6 (Workout Interval 2)
Sprint 30 seconds at maximum effort
Jog/Walk 30 seconds
Minute 7 (Workout Interval 3)
Sprint 30 seconds at maximum effort
Jog/Walk 30 seconds
Minute 8 (Workout Interval 4)
Sprint 30 seconds at maximum effort
Jog/Walk 30 seconds
Minutes 9-12 (Cool-Down)
Jog at about 50% effort
After every two workout sessions, one can increase the number of "workout" intervals they do each time up until about 10 total "workout" intervals. This will allow for a steady progression of fitness levels, and help one realize the full potential and results of interval training.

> While it's definitely possible to perform this training using a variety of methods like with a Stairmaster, bike, or treadmill, it's more beneficial to apply a simple unassisted running technique. Because sprinting causes a greater peak in oxygen consumption, it is most ideal for HIIT workouts.

> It's been shown that the closer one gets to their maximum oxygen intake (or VO2max) while exercising dictates how much fat will be used for energy afterward. So the use of sprints conforms best to our goal of losing adipose tissue.

> However, the option of sprinting is not always convenient for those who want to reduce the stress on their joints. For such individuals, a bike or elliptical machine may be the perfect solution. These types of machines might also want to be used once in a while just to provide a different stimulus for the body, and to prevent adaptation and plateaus. But for the most part, it's highly recommended to stick with the alternation of sprinting and jogging for HIIT.

> For those who have progressed through the previous workout that was outlined and are still seeking new challenges, the following HIIT workout might do the trick. It's certainly not easy and might be the closest to being "the best" one can do for a HIIT workout in terms of intensity.

> ADVANCED HIIT LAYOUT
Minutes 1-4 (Warm-Up)
Jog at about 50% effort
Minute 5 First-Half (Workout Interval 1)
Sprint 20 seconds at maximum effort
Jog/Walk 10 seconds
Minute 5 Last-Half (Workout Interval 2)
Sprint 20 seconds at maximum effort
Jog/Walk 10 seconds
Minute 6 First-Half (Workout Interval 3)
Sprint 20 seconds at maximum effort
Jog/Walk 10 seconds
Minute 6 Last-Half (Workout Interval 4)
Sprint 20 seconds at maximum effort
Jog/Walk 10 seconds
Minute 7 First-Half (Workout Interval 5)
Sprint 20 seconds at maximum effort
Jog/Walk 10 seconds
Minute 7 Last-Half (Workout Interval 6)
Sprint 20 seconds at maximum effort
Jog/Walk 10 seconds
Minute 8 First-Half (Workout Interval 7)
Sprint 20 seconds at maximum effort
Jog/Walk 10 seconds
Minute 8 Last-Half (Workout Interval 8)
Sprint 20 seconds at maximum effort
Jog/Walk 10 seconds
Minutes 9-12 (Cool-Down)
Jog at about 50% effort
Using these 12 minutes as planned, for 3 times a week, will no doubt have anyone reaping the benefits of new leanness and more within 8 weeks. To help stay on track for the duration of the program it is be best to monitor heart rate during exercise in order to ensure that the desired intensity levels are reached.*

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/wotw40.htm

http://www.amazon.com/Resistance-Performance-Bands-Great-Therapy-Fitness-Stretch-Elastic/dp/B00HMJ4ODG/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1458752622&sr=8-3&keywords=work+out+bands

http://www.amazon.com/Black-Mountain-Products-Resistance-Exercise/dp/7245456313/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1458752622&sr=8-1&keywords=work+out+bands

u/TOUCHER_OF_SHEEP · 3 pointsr/EDC

It's definitely enough for a nice knife, though you might want to go a bit higher for a great knife. The KaBar BK2 is actually designed with things like batoning (hammering the knife through wood as a kind of faux hatchet using another piece of wood against the blade of the knife as the hammer itself) or chopping. It's a bit over $60, currently available for $69 to be precise, but as long as you don't flat out abuse it (prying heavy things, for example) it'll serve you well and quite possibly for the rest of your natural life.

At a lower price, you can get the Condor Bushlore, which at $35 is a perfectly valid choice that will serve you well indeed.

For an even lower price yet, the Mora Heavy Companion is from one of those few cheaper knife companies that does incredible work. I wouldn't baton with it, honestly, but even if you did it'd probably hold up just fine.

At a more expensive range, the Ontario Rat-5 is an amazing bushcraft knife. The Fallkniven Pilot Survival Knife is also an amazing knife. The Benchmade Bone Collector is spectacular knife made in D2 tool steel, one of the better steels available at that price. Another amazing knife is the Spyderco Bushcraft made in O1 tool steel. Finally, the Benchmade 162 is a pretty amazing knife.

One thing you'll notice about all of these knives with the exception of the Pilot Survival knife and the BM 162 is that they're all carbon steel knives. Carbon steel is a lot tougher than stainless (with a few very, very rare exceptions I'd never trust a long knife to be stainless steel) with the trade off of being a lot more of a hassle to take care of, since it needs to be regularly cleaned and oiled.

If you want a fire starter, carry a magnesium fire starter. With the carbon steel knives, you can probably strike it against the back of the blade to create the sparks you'll want and if not (like with some of the coated ones) you'll be carrying the striker anyway.

For sharpening, you'll want to get a decent sharpening setup and start stropping. A couple of easy sharpening systems would be the superior Spyderco Sharpermaker (usually available on Amazon around the $50 mark) or the Lansky Sharpening system which while cheaper isn't as good. You could take the time to learn how to free hand it, but most casual users don't care that much because it takes a long time to get proficient at freehand sharpening. Stropping is running the blade against something like smooth leather (usually smooth leather, actually) to remove burrs along the blade of a knife made by use and sharpening and the restore a blade to a better edge without removing metal. Stropping allows for a level of sharpness unachievable by sharpening alone and extends a knife's lifetime by allowing sharpness to be achieved for longer without removing metal from the blade. To learn how to strop, watch videos on YouTube or check out guides from the sidebar of /r/knives.

Finally, if you want a whistle, just carry a whistle. If you want a mirror for signaling, carry a small signaling mirror or mirror polish the knife you buy (a process where you sand the blade with increasing grit level sandpaper until it shines like the sun and you can see yourself in the blade).

If you have any more questions, feel free to ask.

u/Teerlys · 12 pointsr/preppers

I wrote this up earlier today for someone who wanted to start getting prepped on ~$75/Month but also wanted to not have to cook the foods. I did include some long term storage as the first step anyway because it's so cheap and easy, but so far as consumables go, this is a good start for you.

--------------------------------------------

A lot of this is a shelf life and storage space issue. If you have plenty of room for storage, I'd start like this:

  • Month 1: This doesn't meet your doesn't-need-to-be-cooked guideline, but it's a really solid start to bulk up on available calories and requires minimal cash and effort, so it's going in anyway. Ignore it if it's not for you.

    Buy two 50lb bags of white rice from a place like Costco or Sam's Club. Find 3 food safe 5 gallon buckets with lids. Get Mylar Bags and O2 Absorbers. Then hit Youtube for instructions on what to do with them. If the Mylar bags bit will hold you back from doing this, then skip them and just clean the buckets then dump rice in them straight. Seal, date, set aside. That's 160,000 calories in month 1. Given normal pantry supplies that stretches things out quite a ways. Plan on rotating out at 7ish years if put straight into the bucket and 20 years if you use the Mylar. Realistically, with Mylar, white rice may be good for much longer than 20 years (most people say 30, but for the minimal investment I'd rotate earlier to be safe).

  • Month 2:

    Grab a Water Bob (not right now though, hurricane season has prices high and stocks low for them). Also, a Sawyer Water Filter or two. That gives you an opportunity to grab an extra hundred gallons of water in your bathtub initially given enough warning, and some water purification options later on.

  • Month 3:

    Assuming you have storage capacity, start looking at #10 cans of food. Those are the cans that are around a foot tall and very wide. Look for things that you would eat and would be usuable in your daily lives, but also ones that would be calorie dense. For example, refried beans, nacho cheese, baked beans, white potatoes, chick peas, chili with beans, etc. Those are things you can use in recipes at home, but can pick them up and store them for a couple of years first. Getting them in the larger can is a better return on investment/dollar than buying smaller ones.

  • Month 4: This is probably more what you were looking for.

    If your pantry isn't topped up with the things your family normally eats, drop that money to get a little deeper on those things. Velveeta cheese, crackers, cans of soup, noodles, peanut butter/jelly, canned vegetables/fruit, pasta/sauce, salsa, dried/canned beans, seasonings, canned meat, canned chili, etc. Date them and make sure to work through the oldest first. Having the normal foods you eat in bulk will likely end up being what gets you through most things (like the current hurricane season, job loss, winter blizzard, etc). Spending on these things can be used to fill out whatever is left of your budget when it gets partially used up on other things. I'd also maybe consider having some flats of bottled water at home as well. I usually keep 4-7 Costco sized ones on hand for my SO and I.

  • Month 5:

    Start looking at longer term bulk water storage. I like 5 gallon stackable water cubes as they're easier to move and use and you buy them as you have a little extra cash here and there, but if you want to bump the budget up a bit for a month and your wife won't look at you like you're crazy, a 55 gallon barrel is a better price per gallon than the individual cubes. Sometimes there's just no replacing having your own clean water source ready to go. Barring all of that, if your family will use them just grab a bunch of flats of bottled water and rotate them. Stacked high they don't take up a ton of floor space.

  • Month 6 and Beyond:

    At this point you're pretty well set initially for both water and food. Keep the pantry stocked and rotating. Add on for long term stored water as you see fit and maybe invest in something like a Big Berkey if you really want to drop some money into it. At that point I'd probably begin considering longer term food storage. More rice, add in some dry beans (roughly 5 year shelf life in Mylar/Buckets), and if you're feeling really into it you can get unground wheat and that will last 30 years or better in Mylar/Buckets. You'll just need to have a hand crank grinder or two to use it.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I get wanting ready to eat foods, and that's pretty easy to do and a great place to start, but as one last recommendation... grab yourself a Propane Burner and a high pressure hose for it so that you can use regular propane tanks. You may be able to eat cold soup out of the can, but it's a lot more comforting when it's warm, and you can pretty easily have the ability to add more of your foods into your diet (like spaghetti or mac and cheese) when you can still have a burner to work with.
u/BarbarianNerd · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

If you want to get by cheap, pare the list down to essentials.
You need water, food, good shoes/boots, and shelter and to keep it light. Everything else is periphery.

The cheapest and lightest way to carry water is to use an empty quart milk jug or two with a rope on it. It's not as good as a camel back style bladder, but it's more reliable in my experience for fractions of pennies on the dollar.

I recommend a Lifestraw or a Sawyer filter for water purification. They cost about 20 bucks and they're really effective. Not necessarily essential for short trips, but it does a lot for peace of mind and you never know when bad stuff will happen. They don't filter out heavy metals or dissolved materials (ie anything <.1 microns).

REI has a really good info primer on sleeping bags

I wouldn't worry about poles for overnight stuff at all. That's for like weeks of constant hiking or alpine stuff. They can be useful and are helpful, but they can be passed by most of the time.

I get by with a rubberized army poncho and a blanket instead of a tent and bag. It's good enough to keep the rain off and a bit of body heat in, but it's not ideal and it's time consuming. I got it at a yard sale for two bucks. But for one night, it's good enough. A rain fly or tent foot print, or plain tarp is also effective. There are some pretty legit one person backpacking tents out there for about 70-100 bucks, I'll probably get one next. Not sure which brands are good though.

For food, I'd do the mountain house meals and hoist my garbage high and away from camp after wards, preferably in an air tight bag of some kind when you haul it out.

Normally I prefer to do something like pilot bread, PB, dried fruit, a big bag of spinach for the first day or two, green beans, nuts, and maybe some quality sausages and cucumbers, but the convenience of the MRE style foods is often appealing. army steel canteen cups are good for boiling stuff in, but the canteens are kinda useless.

A lighter, some matches, and wet fire packets are great.

Get a mid grade belt knife, like a buck or a k-bar or similar. It's a whole nother can of worms to discuss however. Just be careful as some buck knives are made in china, the ones made in idaho are always marked american made on the packaging.

Silva makes a good compass, a good topographic map, a small 10ths scale ruler (or any cheap one) are a good idea. Know your pace count and hwo to use these tools effectively. Compasses are pretty useful in foul weather or unfamiliar places, but navigational things aren't really essential.

I'd get some biodegradable toilet paper and read this.

That's about all I can think of right now, there's probably more to say and think about. Good luck! Park jobs are a ton of fun! Wish I was going with.

u/rasiahs · 7 pointsr/canadaguns

Congratulations!

  • Personally I would recommend either a Remington 700 over the 783. There's nothing wrong with the 783, but the 700's fit, finish as well as the overall quality is just superior and I'm a firm believer in the "buy once, cry once" philosophy, especially with firearms. If you buy the 783, my bet is that as you get a little more serious about shooting, you'll end up buying a 700.

  • With all that said, if you're not hell bent on buying a Remington, I personally would go with a Tikka T3 (there are many, many models). Overall it's about the same as a Remington 700 in terms of quality, but the bolt action is just silky smooth and the trigger pull is wonderful. I'm biased because I'm a bit of a Tikka fan, so take my advice with a grain of salt.

  • In regards to the .308 calibre, again I'm a bit biased because my rifle is in .308 but regardless, I think .308 is the way to go. It's easily found, and comes in a variety of weight from (approximately) 120gr to 200gr so you have a choice of choosing a lighter bullet for smaller game or a heavier bullet for larger game.

  • To pass the time while your PAL/RPAL is being processed, I strongly suggest buying high quality safety equipment You don't have to break the bank, but don't skimp. Apart from that I'd say buy a good soft case, and later down the road you can buy a hard case (my personal favourite is the Pelican 1750). Here's a little list....

  • Ear protection: Howard Leight Impact Sport and Howard Leight earplugs (Personally I use both-- you only get one pair of ears!)

  • Eye protection: Smith Aegis Arc (DS Tactical is a great company to deal with)

  • Hard case: Pelican 1750 (Production Case is a nice Canadian company with prices way better than anywhere else and great customer service)

  • Bipod: Harris Engineering (widely considered the best bang for your buck product-- I use the 9-13 inch because I'm a bit taller, but most people like the 6-9)

  • Soft case: Cabela's drag bag-- great product at a great price.


  • Torque wrench: VERY important in my opinion, as I see way too many people over-torquing their gear (i.e. scope mount screws) and messing things up. Wheeler Torque Wrench-- this is what I use. It's reasonably priced and I use it all the time when I'm working on my rifle. I know plenty of people say they're not necessary, but they'll save you from major headaches in the future.

  • Bonus: When you buy your scope, DO THIS to level it. I've tried all kinds of methods, but this by far the best (assuming your rifle is levelled first). It's so simple, but so effective.


    Anyway, I hope this helps. I'll check back in a little bit (studying for finals right now) if I think of anything else.
u/aznsk8s87 · 2 pointsr/guns

I'm just going to use this space to write a potential post and then copypasta it to the mods, see if they wanna use it.

Hello! This is sk8s's guide to the holidays!

You're probably here looking for gift ideas for the gun enthusiast in your life. Now, each individual person is unique and preferences, but here's a little launching pad to get you started.

Here is a list of stocking stuffers for the shooting enthusiast in your life, in no particular order.

  • Ammo - Can't shoot a gun if you don't have ammo for it. Know what caliber (size) of ammo to get. If it's a handgun or a rifle, most guns won't be terribly picky about what brand it is. Depending on the caliber, the prices can vary greatly. A box of practice 9mm (50 rounds) will be in the $10-15 range, whereas a box of practice .45 ACP (50 rounds) will cost about $20-$25. Whether it's bulk practice ammo or a box of match grade ammo, it will be enjoyed immensely.

  • Eye and ear protection - I have a pair of these in my bag as a loaner pair (and I use them frequently if I forget my nice pair). Lucky Gunner has a fairly comprehensive guide for eyepro. As for hearing protection, Gunnit recommends the Howard Leight Impact Sport electronic earmuffs. I have them, I love them. A pack of regular foam earplugs is great as well for doubling up at an indoor range.

  • Targets - Gotta have something to shoot at. A pack of paper targets makes a great, cheap stocking stuffer. I like the Shoot-n-see targets for when I'm shooting with friends, and these for when I'm trying to shoot the best I can. However, there can be something quite satisfying about hearing the ring of a bullet hitting steel. If the person has a .22LR, this is an incredibly fun target. My buddy and I have shot well over 2000 rounds at his, and it's just as fun every time. For a centerfire handgun or rifle, check out MOA targets for some great steel targets.

  • Range bag - gotta take all the crap to the range in style! The most recommended range bag here is the Midway USA compact competition range bag. My favorite bag that I've seen (and will probably buy soon) is the GPS Range Bag, but that's because I'm anal about organizing my crap.

  • Range membership - Range fees can be very expensive. A range pass or membership allows the shooter in your life to go whenever they want!

  • Concealed weapons permit class - Has someone in your life been in a situation where they wished they had a gun to protect them? Is someone looking to have gun to prevent that situation from happening? Pay for them to go get their concealed weapons permit. They may or may not carry, but if the state allows it, it is never a bad idea to have such a permit. You know, just in case.

    Now, these are all just some generic questions and are not intended to be a one-size-fits-all solution (though I'm of the opinion that nobody will turn down ammo). Feel free to comment if you have any questions and we can help you out! Happy holidays!
u/travellingmonk · 1 pointr/CampingGear

Stansport Scout, about as basic a tent as you can find. You can find others on Amazon, but they're all pretty much the same. I used one in the 70's as a Scout and I really wouldn't use one today for a lot of reasons... but the main one was that it was hard to get in and out as a teen without knocking the pole out of place and collapsing the tent (or have others steal your poles in the middle of the night). Can't see it being easy as an adult to get in and out without knocking over the poles.

Klymit Static V. Pretty good pad for the price. Of course you can find cheaper knock-offs, but this one is fairly well rated and comfortable enough and warm enough for three seasons. But if you want something for winter, you'll need something a lot more expensive like the Exped Downmat 9.

A sleeping bag down to -18C, think you need to go with a good bag like the Feathered Friends Widgeon. Not something I'd like to carry with me during the summer, you might want to pick up a nice 30F bag for the other three seasons.

Amazon Basics now carries a very popular cookset. The Etekcity Stove is a good stove for the price; the quality isn't as good as the MSR Pocket Rocket 2, but you get two for $20 which is a really good deal. While you can buy one for $15, might as well spend a few extra bucks and get a spare.

As for the FAK, I try to carry the smallest one possible, one that I've whipped together based on what I usually need. However, if you're looking for a bug-out bag, you may want a nice big kit like the Adventure Medical Sportsman Series which can deal with more serious wounds. Still, you can just look around, there plenty of lists for building your own kit.

The other thing you'll need is a water purifier. The ones backpackers use like the Sawyer Squeeze are considered "filters", they're designed to draw water from clean fresh sources and can fliter out things like Crypto and Giardia but not pollutants like heavy metals or pesticides; for a bug out bag you may want a more expensive purifier that can remove heavy metals and chemicals. Actually don't have a recommendation there... but you could just pick up a Sawyer and make sure you draw from clean sources.

u/AFascistCorgi · 24 pointsr/guns

Most people will probably recommend an AR-15, a 12-guage pump shotgun, or a 9mm pistol; but I've actually been moving away from those types of guns after I started to learn more about how much permanent damage firearms do to your hearing. If you ever shoot an AR-15 or a shotgun indoors without hearing protection, you'll probably rupture your eardrums and hear an annoying ringing sound for the rest of your life. So, I'd prefer to avoid that if possible. That's why I recently bought a 9mm carbine (a 9mm rifle with a shoulder stock and a 16-inch barrel) as my new primary home defense weapon. Yeah, you lose out on some terminal performance (killing power), but 30-ish rounds of 147-grain 9mm Federal HST should be enough to deal with 99.999% of home invaders.

An AR-15 chambered in 5.56x45mm NATO will create about 167 decibels (anything above 140 decibels will permanently damage your hearing); a rifle chambered in .308 Winchester will create 170+ decibels; a 9mm pistol with a 4-inch barrel will create about 160 decibels; a 9mm carbine with a 10-inch barrel will create about 156 decibels; and a 9mm carbine with a 16-inch barrel will create about 152 decibels. I haven't been able to find reliable information about how many decibels a 12-gauge shotgun creates, but it's probably in the 160s.

152 decibels still isn't hearing safe; but the difference between 152 decibels and 167 decibels is huge since sound doubles in strength every 3 decibels. 152 decibels will still hurt your ears and cause permanent hearing damage if you hear it repeatedly; but it won't completely destroy your ears like a 5.56x45mm rifle or a 12-gauge shotgun will.

And the reason why I went with a 9mm carbine over a 9mm pistol is because carbines are much easier to aim, you get much quicker followup shots, you get a little bit more bullet velocity (and thus foot-pounds of energy and terminal performance), and there's still a large sound difference between 152 decibels and 160 decibels.

As to which specific 9mm carbines I recommend, I'll give you 3 different options to choose from.

The cheapest option: The Kel-Tec Sub-2000 Gen 2 ($500-ish but hard to find). I'm personally not a fan of Kel-Tec quality standards and aesthetics, but the Kel-Tec Sub-2000 is one of the few firearms that Kel-Tec makes that the vast majority of people in the gun community agrees is a good gun. I'd get the version that accepts Glock magazines and stick a 33-round Glock magazine in it. Glock magazines are widely regarded as being the best magazines in the world; and the 33 rounders that they make are widely regarded as being reliable.

The mid-tier option: The CMMG Mk9LE ($900-ish). From the research that I did on AR-15s chambered in 9mm, the ones made by CMMG are highly regarded as being reliable. I recommend using the 32-round Uzi magazines from IWI. Based on your criteria, this would be my top recommendation for you.

The high-tier option: The KRISS Vector GEN II CRB ($1,300-ish). This is the option that I personally went with. I chose it because it's reliable and because it looks amazing.

I also want to go out of my way to rule out a popular option: The CZ Scorpion EVO 3 S1 Carbine. The "pistol" version is wildly popular; but I've personally seen way too many horror stories about all-polymer magazines stretching and breaking their own feed lips after being stored loaded for a long period of time (which is what you'd be doing with a home defense weapon). So, until CZ upgrades their polymer magazines with steel-reinforced feed lips (like Glock does), I'd personally stay away from their products that use those types of magazines.

And I know that you said that you didn't want to add accessories, but a light is a mandatory accessory on a home defense firearm in my opinion (so that you can positively identify your target before you shoot and therefore hopefully avoid accidentally shooting a loved one). The Streamlight ProTac 2 and the INFORCE WMLx would be my top 2 recommended lights for long guns.

As to which bullets that I'd recommend, I already mentioned them: 147-grain 9mm Federal HST (standard pressure). The 124-grain 9mm Federal HST (standard pressure) is also extremely good. I wouldn't hesitate buying and using either of them for home defense. This website will help you find them in stock.

I also highly recommend this accessory in order to make loading your pistol magazines much, much easier.

As to bullet overpenetration, all major rounds will zip right through several of the kinds of walls that you'd find in a typical home. The only "safe" option is birdshot (used in shotguns), but birdshot doesn't penetrate deep enough into the human body (you want 12 to 18 inches of penetration according to FBI tests) to reliably stop a home invader (and therefore birdshot obviously shouldn't be an option for home defense in my opinion). Don't listen to the people that will tell you that the 5.56x45mm NATO round is safer to use because it tends to tumble and fragment when it hits a wall. It will still penetrate through several walls. You just have to be careful about how you angle your shots. That's really your only way to avoid hitting innocent people.

And if you're not as worried as I am about permanently damaging your own hearing while defending your home, then the Smith & Wesson M&P15 SPORT II would be my top rifle recommendation (I recommend pairing it up with 30-round magazines from Lancer); the Mossberg 500 series of shotguns would be my top shotgun recommendation; and the full-size Smith & Wesson M&P9 would be my top pistol recommendation. And I'd pair them up with this electronic hearing protection if I was you.

As to ammo recommendations for the 3 options that I listed above, I recommend Hornady 75-grain BTHP T2 TAP (8126N) or Hornady 5.56 NATO 75-grain BTHP Superformance Match (the .223 version that Hornady makes is also fine); this Managed-Recoil 8-pellet 00 buckshot from Remington (it patterns very tightly); and the 147-grain 9mm Federal HST that I already mentioned above, twice.

And if you go with a pistol, then I recommend the Streamlight TLR-1 as a mandatory accessory.

As to lubricant, you can't really go wrong with Break-Free CLP.

u/LeaningOnTheSun · 2 pointsr/bodyweightfitness

Okay! I'll give these a go one by one;

  1. You need almost nothing to do bodyweight fitness. If you have a place to do pull-ups and dips you're all set. Most stuff with the door is effective enough but I would recommend getting a door frame pull-up bar and some gymnastic rings so if the weather sucks you won't have to miss your workout.

  2. Weighted jump ropes are a great start. Some resistance bands like these are great for mobility work and adding assistance or resistance. I like to use a basic pair of push-up bars like these because they're easy on the wrist and add some range of motion to your push-ups.

  3. Super useful! Check it

  4. If you eat right and stick to your plan you'll get stronger and add muscle mass. Cut properly and do cardio and you get easily get a very defined physique. If aesthetics are your main goal though you should stick to a traditional bodybuilding routine.

  5. Supplements aren't necessary. I like fish oil though. As far as protein goes as long as you eat meat and eggs you'll get enough to build muscle.

    Good luck! Calisthenics is super fun. I still do weightlifting when I find myself at the gym but bodyweight fitness has become my primary goal.

    Check out these channels/sites for tons of inspiration and info.

    Gold Medal Bodies
    FitnessFAQs
    CalisthenicMovement
u/freeshavocadew · 1 pointr/knives

5 knives

Above is a link to 5 folding knives that may or may not fit what you're looking for and 4 are well within your price range of under $120. One is slightly above at 139.00 on Amazon, but the Chrome extension called Honey is currently allowing a $10 discount. All are made by Kershaw/ZT.

  1. The ZT 0350 is the top knife with the curvy ergonomics to it. It's probably the most basic ZT folder and is currently the only ZT knife I own. It is good for larger hands, it's very sturdy (and heavy) and technically more than $120 but only barely.

  2. The Kershaw Fatback is next to it and has a more triangular appearance. Relatively newer offering from Kershaw, I think, but is certainly proving to be popular. It's as long when closed as the ZT 0350 but is thicker from one scale to the other on the handle AND is lighter. The actual specs for this and all the knives mentioned can be found by Googling them. This knife is currently under $25.

  3. The Kershaw Skyline is probably the most well known knife, I wouldn't be surprised is this has its own lore here on r/knives. It's popular for a reason being lightweight, and well tested as an older, mainstay model from Kershaw. As you can see, mine is showing wear and scratches compared to the other knives! Amazon is currently listing the basic version of this knife for $46.

  4. The next one is the Kershaw OD-1 which is DISCONTINUED. I didn't know this when I took a photo of it for you and started this list. This means the price is higher than you'd pay normally and isn't really available on Amazon or in stores. You can find it on the link provided (I think) which is to one Stop Knife Shop, you can also try Ebay or Bladeforums to find a used one. The link provided appears to be offering this knife for $53, but I don't know what condition that's in. The one I bought on Amazon back in like 2013 or whatever was ~$30-$35. I actually have two of them, but I'm not sure where the other came from. They are cool knives, fun to play with, but not tacticool.

  5. The last one pictured is the Kershaw Cryo and is currently available on Amazon for ~$19. It is the smallest of the knives shown, smaller than the Fatback with the triangular handle by what looks like 2 inches when open. This would be a great beater knife, something that would be a fine flipper and used briefly but would not be comfortable for extended use, especially in large hands. If memory serves, there's two different Cryo models with 2 different sizes, but I have only the one you see. Could be the smaller of the two models.

    NOT PICTURED but I do also have the Kershaw Blur which Amazon is listing at ~$35 currently which is HIGHLY recommended even though it doesn't have a flipper. It's spring assisted opening and a very comfortable grip for larger hands. That price is so good, they're normally $55-$60 that I'm grabbing one of them again as an extra.

    I could list like 4-5 more Kershaw knives but my comment is too long already. If you would prefer more variety in recommendation, Spyderco has some solid options but if you want to go BALLS DEEP into tacticool, one of my most valued knives because it was bought for me as a gift was the Cold Steel AK-47. This knife is quite a bit larger than the ZT shown but is nearly the same price at ~$125-130 on Amazon. You might be able to find it cheaper on Ebay. Be careful though, there is the regular and mini version!
u/launch201 · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

I don't know too much about that backpack, so I can't comment, but you should be able to pickup a pack in that price range if you're just getting started.

water

A lifestraw will work, but essencially you need to go source to mouth, so if you need water for anything but drinking (i.e. for cooking) I don't know if the lifestraw will be best. Sure you can suck in, spit out, but there is a better solution: the sawyer mini is about the same price point: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398890779&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

meals

and that brings me to water for cooking. MREs are heavy, and while you won't be hiking far carrying that weight even for a short distance might not be the most fun (especially if you are saving money on your pack) - there a many commercially available freeze dried meals which are very light and you simply add boiling water to. Mountain house is the most common - http://www.amazon.com/MOUNTAIN-HOUSE-Beef-Stroganoff-4-80oz/dp/B0002YRNJK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398890892&sr=8-1&keywords=mountain+house

besides mountain house there is backpackers pantry (better IMO):
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=backpackers%20pantry&sprefix=backpacke%2Caps

and finally if you want to try some of the best I recommend packit gourmet:
http://www.packitgourmet.com/CookInBagMeals.html

clothes

wool is good because it keeps it's insulation warmth when wet. wool can be expensive though. If the weather is going to be good I'd recommend a couple quick drying shirts (which are pretty affordable)
http://www.amazon.com/Russell-Athletic-Sleeve-Dri-Power-3X-Large/dp/B00719Y8HO/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891200&sr=8-3&keywords=quick+dry+shirt

and be prepared to own the worlds best pair of underwear - buy two pair wear one, wash one in a river:
http://www.amazon.com/ExOfficio-Give-N-Go-Boxer-Brief-Medium/dp/B001M0MN02/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891283&sr=8-1&keywords=exofficio+boxer+briefs

tools

this is probably one of the first things that gets "over packed" what to you anticipate needing a tool for? On the hand saw if you will be collecting fire wood there is a very nice lightweight handsaw that is perfect for backpacking, the Sven Saw:
http://www.amazon.com/SVEN-SAW-Sven-Saw-21/dp/B002J900EQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891413&sr=8-1&keywords=sven+saw

cookware

on cookware it all depends on what you'll be cooking. on a budget I'd recommend this cup:
http://www.amazon.com/GSI-Outdoors-Glacier-Stainless-Bottle/dp/B001LF3IB6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891523&sr=8-1&keywords=GSI+cup

and this stove:
http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Ignition-silvery/dp/B00ENDRORM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891563&sr=8-1&keywords=backpacking+stove

with that you'll be able to boil water for your freeze dried meals, make ramen, and you can also make hot drinks like tea.

u/nestiv · 3 pointsr/Sacramento

I'm just going to drop in and advocate approaching backpacking with the ultralight philosophy. The key principle behind ultralight is to bring only what you need for any given trip and, ideally, nothing more.

Now I'm not saying don't pack things that will add value to your trip, but one of the biggest pitfalls to backpacking is packing in your fears. When people first start, they often bring excessive amounts of clothing, safety gear to outfit an expedition company, more entertainment than one might realistically want or use, or an entire kitchen - sink included. However, most people will discover that if they can lighten the load on their shoulders, they will end up enjoying trips much more. It's best to consider what you need (or even what can be shared in this instance!) - e.g. sharing shelters, cook systems, entertainment, food. Clothing-wise as long as you have an insulating layer (fleece or down jacket) and a rain jacket, and you're more than likely good to go.

So with all that in mind, let's talk about gear more specifically. If you're just getting started, it's best to borrow gear if possible. Sans that option, trying cheap gear is totally reasonable. However as with any hobby, there can be massive differences your random Amazon gear and even the bottom-of-the-barrel hobbyist gear. If you expect you'll want to pursue backpacking more in the future, consider looking into the ultralight and ultracheap gear list recommendations as well as the alternative options.

Since we're looking at coastal trips in California, you can safely estimate lows to be no lower than 40° unless you're truly up in the mountains. Sleeping pad-wise I'd recommend either an inflatable like the Klymit Static V or a CCF pad like the Z-Lite Sol or RidgeRest. I hesitate to recommend an ultralight quilt for a first-timer due to cost, but for reference a 30° HammockGear Econ Burrow weighs 18.62 oz, whereas the one OP linked weighs ~4 lbs.

There's a lot more to be said than what I've mentioned, so I invite y'all to check out /r/ultralight for more discussions on ultralight philosophies and gear. The wiki is a tremendously helpful resource as well. If any of you want a pack shakedown to have someone look over your gear list, feel free to reply or DM me, and I'll try to get back to you when I can. I'll most likely either be out in Texas or climbing Shasta for the weekend this trip will be planned, but have fun out there!

Also paging /r/ulnorcal - /u/Sharp_LR35902 /u/id3550

u/1chemistdown · 1 pointr/Stronglifts5x5

I assume you're in the USA for all of this. First, I recommend looking around your area for a farm/stable/tractor supplier. You can get a couple horse stall mats for cheap. These will be 5'X7' thick (3/4") rubber mats (warning, they're heavy. get help). This will make a great flooring for you gym and they're relatively inexpensive. Next, I highly recommend you determine now what you want out of a rack. Are you someone who is pulling a lot of weight? Will you be? Be honest. The reason I bring this up is something like the Titan T-2 is know for tipping when failing at larger weights. It's rated to 700 lbs but failing a 350 squat can nock the whole thing down. If you never plan to be pulling higher weights then something like that works great. Trust me, it's cheaper to save up for the system you need than replacing. Once you've determined your needs I highly recommend going over to the forums at bodybuilding(dot)com and searching for power racks and reading through the latest stuff. Many of the sellers of this equipment are there and throw up deals. Before you purchase your equipment, check your city or the nearest city's craigslist for the equipment. Often there is a crossfit gym going out of business or some person unloading their stuff and you can get things on the super cheap. When you decide where to put your money, don't skip on safety. Make sure the rack will support what you're doing and you get a decent bench. Those two items are expensive. Next, make sure your bar will support the weights you pull and much more. Also make sure the bar spins well. Last thing you want is sudden torque while lifting. Usually a bar and weights are the easiest to get on the cheap from craigslist. Just make sure you check the spinning and weight rating.

Now that I've given you some generic guidelines, here are some specific examples:

500 lbs rating for $237. This is 14 gauge steel.

This powerline for $342.61 is one of the best entry level racks. It is 12 gauge steel which makes it more durable to drops than the previous one or the Titan T2. It's rated to 600 lbs and has an overall good review and many years in service.

After the cheap ones recommended, you're going to head into the 11 gauge steel racks and better. The price of these start at ~$600 and go up. The list of brands to look at Body solid, Body Craft and Powertec. They all make very solid systems.

For home, avoid systems that need or should be bolted down. Also, avoid a system that is not at least 12 gauge steel. You really do not want soft steel. A final note, make sure the bench is rated for weights you're at and going too. Don't forget to add your body weight to this. Unlike the power rack, you are on the bench.

u/CruiseBiscuits · 13 pointsr/PKA

MVMT watches are well known for being low quality "fashion" watches. These fashion brands are usually aimed at a younger audience so it makes sense they advertise on podcasts. In my eyes they aren't even worth the ~$100 price point. Sure they'll last a while, but so has my 10 year old Timex I got for 20 bucks, or some dollar store one I got as a kid.

 


If you are actually looking for a quality ~$100 watch, look at Seiko, Citizen or Orient. /r/watches is a very good place to learn, and you might find, like countless other beginners, that the Seiko SNK-809 is for you (my first "good" watch was the SNK-807), which is $50-$70 and a real mechanical automatic ("perpetual" for those of you across the pond) movement. Anything from Seiko 5 range is an incredible starter automatic watch.

 

Do some research if an automatic movement vs quartz movement is right for you (quartz is the basic battery operated watch that the "guts" can be found in watches ranging from $500 Movados to dollar store watches). I REALLY like seeing how things work so I really appreciate the mechanics behind an automatic watch. The downside to them is that they aren't as accurate as quartz (a normal range of inaccuracy is like +-10 seconds a day). But you'll never have to change a battery if that is any consolation. If that puts you off, keep in mind that a $10,000 Rolex has an automatic movement good for +- 5 seconds per day. And as a final PSA, stay away from Invicta. Their automatic movements, cheap pricing, and flashy looks may look enticing, but quality control is horrendous. Just as with any potential purchase, do some research on a watch you think looks promising. Give the model name a search on google or /r/watches and try to find a consensus.

 

For those of you who have been thinking they want a watch but haven't started exploring styles (which is the demographic companies like MVMT pander to with their styles) here is the classic "diver" style watch with the Rolex Submariner. A cheaper automatic dive watch I've been wanting for a LONG time is the Seiko SKX007, which obviously pays homage to the Sub, but is about $5800 cheaper. I'd replace the bracelet with something better than what is there though. Maybe I'll get it after college...

Another well loved cheap diver is from Orient, the Mako, though I prefer its big brother, the Ray, even though that is even closer looking to the Submariner.

The absolute best in budget vs quality in a dive watch is the ~$40 Casio MDV-106. You can get a decent 22 mm steel bracelet for almost the price of the watch and it will look fantastic if that is your preference. I've borrowed my brother's a few times and the thing feels like quality and has been put to the test plenty of times to prove itself as a real dive watch. He goes swimming, hiking, plays sports with it, drops it on concrete, etc. Rugged yet elegant looking. Good size too. Highly recommended first diver or first watch!

If you are looking for a real dress watch with "minimalist design" that doesn't look tacky like MVMT's (sorry, just my opinion), there are plenty in the Seiko 5 line like I said, or the lovely Orient Bambino.

 

Came back to say that if you don't really know if you want a watch, don't think you need to spend $100 on your first. Who knows, you might not like how it feels or looks on you or whatever. For the absolute cheapest of cheap, get yourself a Timex or Casio quartz watch. These brands are well renowned for their reliability. This way you'll end up spending only $15-20 on a watch that will last and work forever (obviously with battery changes along the way).


Edit: Some links

Edit: Also, they are purportedly just rebranded cheap Chinese watches. http://www.aliexpress.com/cheap/cheap-mvmt-watches.html

u/Odysimus · 3 pointsr/searchandrescue

Traditional SAR, the teams you will find around the country operate in a whole different world than the military. For the most part you can sort of look to volunteer firefighters as an analogy, even then they tend to be more regimented than SAR. There are some SAR teams out there that have more of a military structure to them, but most of what you will find will feel more like SAR clubs (think chess clubs, hiking clubs, etc). My unit meets once a month, we have a business meeting with the whole review last month's minutes, reports on events since the last meeting, old business, new business, etc. After that we conduct a classroom training session on topics like Lost Person Behavior, Medical Techniques, Navigation, etc. We also conduct regular field trainings to bring it all together. We don't have ranks, we have a list of skillsets and we are each typed according to our ability in each skill. Our unit and all the units I know don't work with weapons, sure we carry knives, but the biggest blade most of us work with is one of these, not some giant thing that rambo would carry, no machetes, no hatchets. If there is a situation where SAR skills are needed for say a fugitive, we stay home. We have done evidence searches for things criminals have tossed into the woods, but they were already in jail.

SAR in the military is their own thing and while we can and do work together on missions they are a unit that stays a unit. When we ask for military assets we indicate what needs to be done and they tell us what they are sending and what it will do. If I show up on a mission with 5 other people from my unit we might be on a team together or I might get put in with members of a different unit.

When it comes to the actual searching it is simply a lot of covering ground. We walk, and we walk, and we walk. 99% of the time we get nothing, there are only so many clues out there. There is one really awesome clue (the person or thing you were out to look for) and tons of acreage to cover. We often start from a last known point and try to move that further along in time. An example we were out looking for a mushroom hunter, when I showed up they new where he started into the woods, we then found a clearly picked mushroom and a couple of boot prints. That advanced the last known point a few hundred feet and gave us a second breadcrumb to work with. It takes a certain type of person to do that effectively. I have seen plenty of people bow out because they had been on maybe a dozen searches over several years and never found a thing. One of our radio operators has been on 8 missions, each ended in a recovery. My hope when I got in was to find a clue at some point, and Oh Boy my first time out I got the find, I found the 24yro woman who had hanged herself. We don't have an obligation to respond to one call or another, but you also don't get to decide who gets lost and when. You also have to get along real well with the others on your team. I've been on all sorts of teams and there are people that I know I don't want to go out with, and certain combinations of people that I won't go out with.

With every one of your responses I feel more and more that SAR wouldn't be a good fit for you now. Most units welcome visitors, I would say that you might consider finding one of the local unit's meetings and checking it out. Attend a few meetings before even considering applying, and talk to the people there and be honest about what you are looking for. Once you get started into it there is a substantial investment in time, energy, gear, and training on the part of you and your team. It isn't worth it to go through a bunch of training and getting geared up to not be a productive member of a team (remember finding nothing is something). I'm not sure what exactly you are looking for, but I don't think SAR is it. There is always a "who knows?" aspect and if you spend some time around a unit you may find that it is a good fit, or that your outlook might change. Our mountain rescue unit has people "hang out" around them for several months before offering them an application, in their world they have to trust their lives to their team. While the regular old SAR doesn't require the same standard it is very easy for someone (as good at it as they may be) to be more of a distraction than a help.

TL;DR
I don't think SAR is going to get you what you want. If you do feel like continuing down this path talk to the people in the unit(s) in your area, be honest, and don't take it personally if they tell you "no".

u/nmp12 · 2 pointsr/aspergers

Ok, I'm 5'9" and 160, and I've been at 175. Are you calling me fat? Because I've not once considered myself fat.

I've considered myself a little overweight at times, but never fat.

That brings us to step one for every problem I've encountered in life: be honest with yourself. Don't hype up your problems so you can give yourself a pity party-- that's some bullshit that depression, social anxiety, and a host of other mental conditions use to thrive in your mind. Dig through the bullshit within your head to come to the truth: yeah, you're probably overweight, but the only thing keeping you that way is you. Is that depressing? A little.

Know what's more depressing? Not doing anything about it. You are capable of changing your physical appearance, quite dramatically in fact.

Summer is coming up. Set a date once school is out. Buy a calendar now and get hyped for it. Circle that date with a big red marker. What is that date? It's the date you start a new daily routine.

Invest $30 in a set of workout bands ( the set I use ) off of amazon. I'd also suggest buying a pull up bar, as bands are annoying for those kinds of exercises. Get yourself a solid pair of athletic shorts, some protein powder, some creatine powder, and a whole shitton of powdered gatorade.

I advise you to buy this because I'm someone who needs a routine to accomplish anything, and having the proper equipment and supplements is like lubricant for my resistance to change routines.

Now that you have everything, you're going to acquire the P90X videos, plans, and diet guide PDFs. Yes, you know how to do this without money because the internet is magical, though if you have the cash to buy them go for it. You don't even need P90X, there are plenty of amazing workout routines. Insanity is another popular set of instructions.

I don't care what stigma you've attached to people who do P90X or Insanity or whatever else. If you're posting on this forum, imma assume you score on the AS. If you score on the AS, chances are you like your routines, as do a lot of other people. Video workouts-- in my experience-- are outrageously useful because it's a prepackaged, professionally planned routine that you can follow or strive for. Follow the diet, too, ESPECIALLY for the first three weeks-- after that you can add in a little wiggle room. If it helps, get your parents in on it. Chances are they'll be your cheerleaders and buy you a bunch of awesomely delicious, but still healthy food.

So now we have the date marked on the calendar, we have all of our equipment, and we have a routine ready to be followed. The hardest part is holding yourself to it.

Wake up every morning, get yourself a good, light breakfast, and hit the routine. Follow the diet as closely as you can, counting calories and changing the kinds of meals you eat. If you can't do the day's full workout (god knows I couldn't) don't get down on yourself. Instead, put that energy towards making sure you do better the next day, even if it's just one more pushup. Record your results. Once you break past the three week barrier, you'll find your routine on auto-mode. You'll wake up looking forward to completing the workout, and getting to that beautiful last stretch in the cool down where a bead of well deserved sweat trickles off your nose, and you hit the shower.

Take a picture of yourself every fucking day. Get a full length mirror, mark where your feet go on the floor, and rest your camera in the same position each time. If you need motivation after the first two weeks, scroll throw those pictures and you can literally watch your body change. After the first month, you'll have enough pictures to see how quickly the change happens. After two months, you'll look forward to taking that fucking picture and comparing it with the one last week.

After the summer is over and you've completed whatever routine you stuck with, you'll notice some things: you won't feel uncomfortable when people are physically close to you. Smiling becomes easier. Most importantly, when you stand up straight, you'll realize what a confidence boost it really is to hold yourself high. Your teeshirt won't be poking out from a belly, but with newly minted pecs and abs.

And at the end, when all is said and done, you will realize what a huge effort those "attractive people" go through to keep looking that way. You'll also realize what a huge social advantage it is to take the time and effort to invest in your personal appears. Go to Goodwill and buy yourself a couple casual button downs and some tight tee shirts and you'll have more than you can handle.

Once you understand "them," your hate will start to dissolve. Additionally, you'll probably be a stud. So there's that.

u/CedarWolf · 2 pointsr/Shoestring

Hey, you can also make quite a bit of your own gear if you're feeling up to the challenge. Check out /r/myog for more information about that.

Fancy, fold up cook kits can run you $20 to $70 or more, plus fuel, but you can also make your own cook kits real easily from soda cans, cat food cans, and grease pots. You can get one from Walmart for $7, and an aluminum pot handle from any outdoors store for a couple of bucks. Here's a basic one for $4, but you can find them for $2, too. You can also use a folded bit of aluminum foil as a wind break around your stove.

The best part about those is not only are they light and cheap to replace, but your can stove and your aluminum handle should fit neatly inside your grease pot. Depending on how tall you made your windbreak, you might be able to fit it inside your pot, too. If not, it's just aluminum foil; it'll fold up.

It really depends on what your budget and your conditions are. You can grab a cheap, fairly light tent for $50 or $60. (If you want to go crazy cheap, there are $20 tents that you can set up between two trees or support with trekking poles.)

I wouldn't suggest depending on a cheap tent for the long term, but use them as something you can test out, beat up, and not be too heartbroken over. They're just the basics.

Woot.com often has sales on camping gear, including backpacks, light blankets, sleeping bags, and hammocks. Decent backpacking hammocks usually run about $15 to $25 online, don't stress about getting one that's really expensive and has a lot of features. They're pretty much all parachute hammocks. Worry about investing in the expensive stuff later.

My advice, though? Don't stress about your gear at first. Get some cheap starter gear, read about it, test it, make a plan. Drop on by /r/trailmeals and find some simple recipes that you like. Find a nice state park nearby and look at their maps. Find a camp site and see what's there: Do you have trees available for hammocks? Is there a fire pit already set up? Do you have wood available for fuel? (You probably won't need much more than your cook pot and utensils if your campsite has a firepit with a grill, for example.)

Make your plan and execute it. Let people know where you're going, and what you're up to. Invite a friend if you can. Put your comfy shoes on, toss your crap in a backpack, go out for a weekend, and test your gear. Get some experience with your new stuff, see what works for you and what doesn't. Learn where you want to focus if you want to shed weight, and check your reviews. Go to places like REI: they'll often let you see or set up any tent you're interested in, in advance, so you can check out how easy or how difficult it might be on the trail, in the dark. That last part's important. You can have the fanciest tent in the world, but it doesn't mean a hill of beans if you can't set it up in the dark. (Because at some point, you will be setting up your tent in the dark, in the rain, in some sort of adverse conditions. It happens. Be prepared.)

Practice with your gear, learn your gear. Learn your limits and your preferences.
Knowledge is easy to acquire, useful to have, and doesn't weigh anything, so pack a lot of it.

You're gonna want to get that experience on your cheap stuff, so you can learn and make mistakes without ruining some high-end piece of kit that's really gonna cost you. Get your experience in and add the expensive, fancier stuff as you go. I like to focus on pack, shelter, and shoes. They're going to be your main sources of weight and your big comfort items. Bad shoes and ill-fitting packs hurt. Insufficient shelters suck. Upgrading those early on, or starting with some mid-tier gear if you can afford it, is handy.

And if you decide that maybe this isn't for you, that's okay, too. You can back out without having dropped several thousand dollars on all the latest gear. It's easy to spend hundreds on fancy gear. Try to avoid falling into that trap.

It's probably ultralight heresy, but I often bring a cheap paperback book with me. Sure, it's sort of heavy for a luxury item that I don't need, and if it falls in a creek then my book is destroyed; I get that. However, for me, you can't beat hanging out in a comfy hammock under the trees with a good book. That serenity is why I go hiking and backpacking in the first place.

I also tell myself that if things ever go incredibly sour, a cheap book or a trail journal is also a good source of tinder and toilet paper. Not that I would do such things, but if I was ever stranded somewhere and I had to, the option is there. Similarly, you can signal other hikers or other people in your party if you have a trail journal - just pull out a page and leave a note for them.

Oh, and it's also wise to bring a couple of trash bags along with you. Get the big, kitchen sized ones.

They're great for:

| | | |
|:--:|:--:|:--:|
| holding trash | separating wet clothes | good laundry bags |
| dirty shoe mat | tent hole repair | emergency ponchos |
| emergency pack covers | food bag | extra warmth |

------

Oh, and remember the simple principles:

Pack it in, pack it out. - Any gear (or people) you bring, you're responsible for getting it (or them) back out.

Leave no trace. - You have a responsibility to leave your campsite as you found it, or better than you found it. Any trash you bring, you pack it right back out with you. If someone before you has been an asshole and has left a bunch of trash all over the campsite, try to clean it up, even if you can't pack it all out.

Hike your own hike. - This means that you can have all the excellent advice in the world, but how you do your hike is up to you. No one else can tell you how to live your life, and if you want to carry a little extra weight for a luxury item, or if you prefer a bit of kit that isn't quite in vogue this season, or if you can't afford the high-end, cuben fiber this or that, don't stress about it. You're out there to enjoy yourself, focus on that.

Be prepared. - This is the Boy Scout motto. Things will happen that you're not going to expect. Don't go overboard and don't get too crazy about it, but have a plan and know how to execute it. Learn the area you'll be at and know what sorts of conditions to expect. If you get hurt, know who you can call. If you're in a state or national park, those phone numbers are always on the freebie trail maps they provide - grab one at the ranger station or the trail head and keep it with you or keep a photo of it on your phone. Are you going to need extra batteries? Is your phone going to have service? If you can, sign up for a first aid course or a trail-specific first aid course. That's information you'll want to know if you ever need it.

u/_BALL-DONT-LIE_ · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

Backpacking is what I love above all else, happy to help.

Finding a local Facebook Group or forum is definitely great advice, they're usually the best resources for learning about places to go/conditions to expect/anything specific to your area, plus find some people to tag along with. Starting out with day hikes is also totally the right thing to do, it will help give you a feel for moving through the woods. You could also combine this with car camping to familiarize yourself with your gear and with cooking/sleeping/etc. outside with a little less commitment than a backpacking trip.

I'd recommend /r/Ultralight over BackpackingLight, which is not particularly active and of much poorer quality than it was a few years ago, IMO. /r/Ultralight is quite welcoming/helpful and pretty active these days. I don't always agree with him, but Andrew Skurka is a well known hiker/adventurer who is also a great resource (both his website and his book). I think he is more approachable for beginners than a lot of others.

I disagree with /u/ImAtleastTwelve, at least to a certain degree, on cost. It certainly is not a cheap hobby by any means (especially considering even in great outdoors cities you're still almost certainly going to need to drive decent distances), but having a fairly light setup with solid gear doesn't have to be exorbitantly expensive—at least relative to say, fashion or photography. I could write endlessly about all kinds of gear, but just taking the example of stoves. You can get a little stove that screws onto a gas cansiter and weighs about an ounce for under 20 bucks. Startup costs can be high because there is quite a bit of gear you need, but it doesn't have to be too crazy. Also, it's a popular activity—lots of used gear (I rarely buy anything new) and people to borrow from out there.

And like he said, it's totally possible to do any number of amazing trips with whatever gear you can scrape together. The gear is a means to an end with backpacking, and all you need is enough to survive somewhat comfortably before you're ready to go outside and enjoy yourself. Everything after that is either making it more comfortable or extending your limits.

u/MadDuck- · 2 pointsr/homegym

That bar is pretty junky, but you're basically getting it for free with the weights. It'll get you started and you can upgrade that later if you get serious about it. It'll also give you a beater/landmine/superset bar in the future if you upgrade.

Chances are, if you got the $95 one you would probably end up wanting to upgrade it anyways.

this one is is a decent starter bar (they have one for $120 as a warehouse deal, which is how I bought mine). It has decent, but not great bushings and ribbed sleeves so the plates and clamps stay on better. The sleeves are also held on by a circlip instead of pinned like the cheaper ones. The bar isn't nearly as strong as some of the better and newer bars, but it's still pretty good and a lot better than those cheaper ones. The knurling isn't that aggressive, but it's much better than most cheap bars. It also has a black oxide finish on the bar.

Black oxide is one of my favorite finishes. Unlike Zink plated, chrome, or ceratoke the black oxide doesn't take away from the sharpness of the knurling. They dunk the bar in a bath of nitrates ect. and it creates a very thin (I believe only a few millionths of an inch) oxidized layer that does an ok job of warding off rust. It can still rust and it's not as durable as other finishes, but it'll feel very much like a bare steel, or stainless steel bar, which imo are the best feeling.

You should also check out titan fitness and maybe rep fitness. They might have comparable bars.

u/buyers-remorse · 2 pointsr/homegym

I have both the valor bd-7 power rack+dip handles as well as the FG pro utility bench. They're solid, budget pieces of equipment, offer good bang for your buck, and get the job done. Both the rack and bench are more lightweight than other options out there, but as long as you won't outgrow their weight capacities, they should be fine (I think 500 lbs for the rack and 600 lbs, weight and user combined, for the bench). Keep in mind, the lat pulldown gets in the way of incline benching inside the rack. If that's going to be a problem, you can elect to get just a rack without a lat pulldown and attach something like this for pulley work. There are definitely more luxurious options out there in terms of racks, like ones from Rogue (and they have the option of a bunch of cool attachments) but it all depends on your budget and goals. There are some flaws to the rack, like the storage pegs getting in the way of benching inside the rack when loaded with plates (I ended up removing the top pegs and am thinking about moving the pegs to the front by switching the front and back posts so I can actually store plates on the pegs). Overall, the rack gets the job done for me and I like having the option to do pulley work. Here's a thread on the bench that helped me decide on buying it. Definitely happy about it, especially at the price I got it for. Dick's always has 10% off when you sign-up for emails here. At the time, I was able to stack the 10% with a 20% off coupon to get the bench for $140.77 after tax and free in-store pick up.

I got a package that included the triceps rope and single handle here for $21 that are working fine if you want to save some money on attachments.


If you're interested in doing olympic lifts farther down the road, this barbell is generally considered the best bang for your buck barbell and comparable to more expensive options out there. It all depends on your needs, the Dick's set might work just fine.

Let me know if you have any questions.

u/garbageaccount97 · 2 pointsr/xxfitness

This is the best example I've seen of someone using bands to their max advantage: https://bretcontreras.com/band-glute-exercises-for-the-win-erin-mccombs-intriguing-training-methods/

However, she previously did regular lifting for a long while, I guess, so, not sure how well her results reflect the bands per se. But they didn't do nothing :)

I use bands because I'm working around injuries - that's why I had the other sets before, because of grip issues, and now I have a knee thing that doesn't feel good when it gets direct weight from above, and because I'd given my weights away (bc injuries), and there's no way I can get new ones up to my place. It takes no time at all to max out on a band set like this one, that's why I keep buying bands :) Although, hopefully, I now have enough to double/triple up.

If it's at all possible, I'd invest in free weights for home, honestly :/ The bands are pretty good, but I think they'll eventually wear out (and plates won't). I think I'm up to close to $200 CAD spent on bands, all told, so far. Not that much less than I spent on my old free weights.

That said, although I think there are subtle differences in how the weight kind of behaves, ultimately, resistance is resistance, and signs are pointing to failure being failure. (See e.g. some of the studies mentioned in this thread.)

The good things about bands are that they're light, portable, don't take up space, and you can use them in lots of ways (I am inspired by the creativity of the person I linked to above). Really versatile, great for people with injuries.

It's worth getting a big set with a lot of bands, with several handles and door anchors, so you don't have to keep switching them out, that's annoying with the small set I have. Like get something like this instead of the very cheapest version (which is what I got). At some point you'll probably want a few big looped bands like I just got - like these (for squats, deadlifts, and hip thrusts). Couple of smaller looped bands would be good. (For that I am just using old cheap Therabands from physio that ended up snapping, or the flat bands I have, tied together. I am so cheap)

also, I got my big bands from a fitness depot type place, for about half the price of what was available on Amazon. i'm pretty sure that's also where my gym gets their crap, I think these are actually the bands they use, so they must be ok :)

u/Rehd · 8 pointsr/bicycling

Enjoy the FX! I'm rocking the 7.5 and I am completely in love with cycling. Here's a few words of advice:

Ditch that cable lock. I can walk up to a bike with a cable with a five dollar tool and have it for myself in 10-20 seconds. Get a U-Lock and rope. The correct answer for how many locks or what kind of locks to use is how many you are willing to carry. This will depend on your location as well. U-Locks + ropes typically require an individual to have a hacksaw, grinder, etc. I live in a smaller college town and mostly just have to worry about drunk assholes so that works perfect. In other areas more heavy duty and smaller U-Locks are more necessary. This will probably work fine and is cheap unless you're in Detroit or something.

Fenders. I feel like that should be your next investment unless you bike a lot at night. I bike a ton at night and decided to invest in great lights after almost being hit by both cars and bikes several times. The first time you have somewhere to be and go through a puddle, the fenders pay for themselves. These are what I rock and I go through puddles / lakes which I probably shouldn't. I stay nice and dry while my friends breeze through them and get completely soaked.

Racks and bungies are great for the FX series. Like others mentioned, this is just a fun bike. I use it for recreation, commuting, bar hopping, exercise, you name it! A rack and a bungie net makes it awesome and Ortlieb panniers are an even better addition.

Besides fenders however... the seat and pedals (maybe) are the next things I'd recommend to look at. The pedals look metal in that picture, but if there's plastic, toss them. Well, I guess you can use them. It depends on the rider, but there's a pretty good track record of the FX series stock pedals only lasting roughly 500 miles before they completely break. Obviously this will vary by user. These are my favorite commuter pedals because I can go clipless later or I can commute at the same time without switching out. These are cheaper and better for commuting just because of the pricing.

As for the seat, your ass will never get more comfy than sitting on a brooks.

Enjoy the FX, it's a wonderful machine and I cherish mine. I was biking to work for the first time in a month (been on vacation) and I forgot I had to go to work. I accidentally biked a few extra miles down the bike path before I remembered I was commuting and not going for an enjoyable bike ride. Careful, it becomes an addiction.

And here's a shameless plug for my pride and joy. It still had the old pedals, saddle, fenders and needs an updated snapshot.

u/AmuseDeath · 2 pointsr/StopGaming

I think the best advice to be given to high school people is just to CHILL. When I went there, there was a lot of social pressure to fit in and get to know whatever. But I think the best thing I could have done was not care. And I say not care meaning like okay, so you have more friends... how does that then make me inferior? Yea, you can meet girls there, but you can also meet girls after high school. If you know you are cool, then you don't really have to worry about these other things.

I didn't have many friends in high school. My friend pool actually vanished and I had to move into a new group. I still keep in touch with some of these guys to this day. It was cool to have a group, but life moves on and changed a whole bunch after high school.

I don't think you should see games as an enemy or an obstacle that prevents you from having a social life, but just think of it as something you do. What makes you social is really who you are and that is a sum of everything you do and believe in. The other half is who you are interacting with. They might not be social... then it's not really you then.

I guess I feel like the odd one here because I still do play games, but I'm subscribed to this forum. I play games and 99% of the people I run into do not know what I play or don't play games. That's fine. It's an activity that I enjoy that makes me competitive or enjoy content. I don't see it that much different than say being stuck on a good TV series like Breaking Bad. I don't think it's really playing games that is bad, but an addiction to it that is the case. If you are pushing away friends, family and opportunities to game, then it should be a concern.

So I would make sure you have your basics down. Get your grades up, eat well and keep it cool with parents and such. I would go ahead and buy these:

http://www.amazon.com/Perfect-Fitness-31000-Basic-Pushup/dp/B008DNA9WU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1419809491&sr=8-3&keywords=push+up+pro

http://www.amazon.com/Iron-Gym-Total-Upper-Workout/dp/B001EJMS6K/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1419809561&sr=8-1&keywords=pull+up

These are one of the best purchases I have ever made. Just buy them and use them time to time. I do pull ups and push ups here and there and I look pretty decent. I'm not a walking bulge of muscle, but it builds some and I don't look lanky. BUY THEM. They last a long time and are so much cheaper than a gym membership. You also want to throw in some running and squats as well.

It's pretty terrifying at lunch time when you go out to recess and there is nobody you meet with. Then you start freaking out... man I don't have friends... man I'm a loser, etc. I would try to find groups that you see people that share your interests with or find school clubs you can be around and hop into. One of the better things I found out was that in reality, EVERYONE is terrified at this age. When you realize that, you realize everything you fear is constructed and that it's really up to you to care or not. I still think having friends is better because it's more fun. Just calm down and be smart. Before you know it, you'll be the coolest guy you know.

u/jsamhead · 2 pointsr/knifeclub

I'd actually start a little lower if I were you, then work your way up. I started with a Spyderco PM2 ($125ish) and then actually went down to some more budget friendly knives. You can get some TREMENDOUS value out of a few budget blades available right now. Here's a few that I HIGHLY recommend.

Top Pick: Sanrenmu Land 910+ or 9103. I'd choose the 910+ because it's got nice grippy scales and is easier to open/close than the 9103.

Compact, Lightweight, and Classy: Kershaw Atmos. Fantastic action, well known designer, nice and compact.

Workhorse: Spyderco Tenacious. This thing is built to cut. Nice and thin blade stock with a full flat grind, cuts like nothing else. Carries really well too.

Those are three of the best started blades on the market IMO. There's a lot more value in these than in some of the other commonly recommended blades like the Ontario Rats. If you do want to spend your full $100 budget, I'd just pick up all three of these. That way you can figure out exactly what you like before committing to one expensive knife purchase. Plus, once you do, you can hold onto the budget blades for backup knives or sell them over on r/knife_swap.

I hope you find the right knife for you. Good luck!

u/zedmartinez · 4 pointsr/bicycling

If you aren't in a city with notoriously high and advanced bike theft, and aren't leaving it out overnight, try this: http://www.amazon.com/OnGuard-Pitbull-Ls-11-5-4-5/dp/B005YPKBRI/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1463020335&sr=8-3&keywords=onguard+pitbull

The long shackle is technically less secure, because it's easier to leverage open, but in a place without a lot of racks it's a blessing to have, because you can fairly easily find /something/ in short walking distance that'll go around, unlike the smaller Ulocks that mostly only work with racks (or, I've found, bikes without big bags and wide upright handlebars). It's a good medium security lock, and both sides of the shackle lock. Downsides, it's heavy, because big, but not as heavy as a chain which is your next smart option (don't get cable locks, they can be cut soooo easily), and the mounting bracket is OK, but I've had two of them fail. I just carry mine in a bag now.

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1463020570&sr=8-1&keywords=kryptonite+series+2 This is a little lower security lock, but still a mighty fine one in an area with mostly thefts of opportunity. The included cable is for passing through your wheels for a secondary bit of safety. It's the best selling option at the good local bike shop out where I am (Indianapolis).

As for using them, this is the classic guide: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html His method is routinely the best, but without racks it can be hard to lock through the wheel and not the frame. If you can't lock through the wheel, make sure the shackle goes through one of the triangles. And, no matter what, lock to something securely attached to the ground and don't lock to anything the bike can be lifted off and over. Be sure and try lifting any cheap racks you do come across, you'll be surprised how many aren't bolted down right... or at all.

u/camobit · 3 pointsr/Pennsylvania

first and foremost, find a hunter safety class and take it. there is an online option now but I really recommend going to an in-person class. I did this when I was 11 or 12 and remember some very experienced old timey hunters explaining everything. we even got hands-on experience with some old 22's and got to shoot them at a range.

they will cover most of your questions, and will go over gun safety and how to hunt safely (identifying your target, whats behind your target, etc). They should also cover the basics of field dressing (removing the organs out in the field).

If you want to hunt deer you're going to want a rifle of at very minimum .243 caliber (preferably higher, i hunt with .30-06). Hunting rifles as of this moment cannot be semi-automatic although there is a real possibility this will be changed by next hunting season. (Even so the most common AR-15 which is .223 caliber is too small for hunting deer.) A .270 is a common whitetail caliber, big enough to take down a deer but not going to kick as hard as .30-06 or .308.

When you buy your hunting license, it comes with one tag to harvest an antlered deer. The rules of what makes a deer count as "antlered" vary from region to region but for most of PA it requires at least 3 points on one side. The paperwork you receive will also have a form you must mail in to your county treasurer to apply for a doe tag. The doe permits are limited and the earlier you apply the better your chances are. A doe tag is only good for the zone you applied in.

If you want to hunt rabbits and birds such as pheasants or turkey you'll want a shotgun. Most people would hunt with a 12 gauge but if you've got a smaller frame you might want a smaller gun (16 or 20 gauge). Turkey requires a tag similar to a buck, which are included in your regular hunting license.

Ducks require a special stamp you can buy when you purchase your license, and there are rules about the metal in the shot shells when you hunt waterfowl (it can't contain lead).

if you're interested in squirrel hunting you can use a shotgun, but the more challenging way to do it is with a 22 rifle. This is a very small and inexpensive bullet.

If you've never handled a gun you're going to be nervous carrying it around with a shell in the chamber. The best thing you can do is take it a range (such as these) and go through a few boxes of shells practicing. A State Game Lands range is free to use as long as you have a hunting license. The one by me usually has a game commission officer there who would be happy to answer questions. Just practice, learn where your safety is, be aware of where the muzzle is pointed, and keep your finger out of the trigger guard. Also protect your hearing! You will need hearing and eye protection at the range!

you need to wear orange on your head and chest/back for most seasons in PA, the exception being some archery/muzzleloader and turkey hunting. Just get a hat and vest and you'll be fine.

Other gear: knife (I prefer a small fixed blade knife to a folder for cleaning deer; less places to get hair and gunk stuck), lighter, maps, emergency whistle, emergency blanket, drag rope (to get the deer out of the woods), rubber gloves (so you aren't a mess after cleaning a deer), and I bring a spare phone battery.

Like any other adventure in the wild make sure people know where you're going and when you should be home.

u/WatermelonRhyne · 2 pointsr/xxfitness

This has the most bang for your buck. The quality of the bar is just blah, but the weights are pretty decent. The bar is about to become my spare for just bench press, after I upgrade to a Rogue Ohio. But it served me well for the last year.

Just remember that muscles come from use, and typically we use them by picking heavy stuff up and putting it back down. You don't need something fancy for that. You can go over board (I love stocking my home gym, so yeah it's easy to go over board) and buy expensive brands, but starting with the basic versions is fine.

------

If you're looking for a power cage also, this one is the best value. It has pretty good reviews and several people in /r/homegyms have them. Good price, easy to find attachments for, and great weight rating.

These weight lock rings also were a god send. The ones that come with the sets are usually usable but annoying.

u/derpderpdonkeypunch · 6 pointsr/guns

If you can time it right and catch the 795 on sale, you can save a decent bit of money. I hadn't seen them on sale, so I bought my fiancee a 795 and spent about $175 on it. I recently got the tech sights for both her rifle and mine. For an appleseed event, you'll want two ten round magazines. Since they are hard to find in a brick and mortar location and I was going to be paying shipping anyway, I ordered two 10 rounders in addition to the one the rifle came with.

Costs as follows:
Rifle: $175
Tech Sights $ 69
2x Mags $ 28
GI Sling $ 10
Swivels $ 12

Total $294

That total does not include shipping charges, nor does it include any further equipment costs such as:

  • Eye protection (I splurged and got my lady the Smith Ageis Arc because I like her eyes and it looks like they rated very well for the price in The Lucky Gunner Eye Pro Breakdown. Fortunately, I have some older glasses that offer sufficient protection but I will be buying myself some newer eye protection before we do our appleseed event at the end of the month.),
  • Ear protection (you'll want to double up and get plugs of some sort and muffs, especially if you're shooting at an indoor range at times. I got us the Howard Leight Impact Sport electronic muffs which are pretty highly recommended) or,
  • Ammo (if you can find 22lr at a reasonable price)

    You can go less expensive on the ear an eye protection. The first few times I took my lady shooting, we had good ear plugs and less expensive eye protection (at an outdoor range) and I saved up for a while to get the better stuff.

    I feel like it was worth it to get the extra stuff and rifle so that we can attend the appleseed event together. Much of the value in it, I think, comes from all the range time you get. If One of us were to go without the other then try to teach the other, it would probably take significantly longer to teach the second person unless you later dedicated an entire weekend to shooting. I think it's better to knock it out in on weekend, rather than spread out over weeks or months. You two can develop together as shooters.

    As I've been educating my fiancee and guiding her into being comfortable with guns, this is something I've given a good bit of thought to, and something I had and have been saving for for a few months. Buying shooting gear can be a large-ish initial outlay, but the headphones, eye protection, and firearms acquired are something that will serve us well for many years to come, so that is something to bear in mind as you weight the options, buy initial gear, and possibly later acquire replacement gear of higher quality.

u/ForrestSmith151 · 2 pointsr/hiking

First Aid Kit - you might not need it ever, but you should always have it. All kits are different but there are fundamental items that should be carried, you can check out the NOLS Kits
and either buy one or for less, make your own that is custom to your needs and desires.

Tools - First, carry a knife that can cut decent size branches, again, you might not need it but its good to have. Second, I recommend getting a water filter such as a Sawyer mini or Katadyn Be Free as they are both lightweight and will probably decrease your pack weight if you hike near water. Third, Fire can be helpful in many situations but must be used carefully and with respect. If you live somewhere that allows it, a wood burning camp stove will be worth some warmth and also allow you to cook if you bring along a mess set. I personally use an MSR Pocket Rocket. As a day hiker, you might not use a stove often but it's not bad to have if you do longer hikes or are far from civilization so if that's the case, look into tablet stoves. generally, you should have a lighter or two just in case. You may also consider carrying a survival blanket just in case (as goes for most these objects).

The Front Pouch - So the idea behind having this pouch is to have things that you want quick access too on the trail, the most important of which is your map. Navigation is important when hiking so if you're not familiar with an area buy a map and bring a compass. I personally don't use a compass but I've learned how to navigate without one, however you should always have a map. You may also need to have a permit for some hiking areas and it's nice to have within reach, usually with your map. you may also like to have TP and a camp trowel in there so that it is not hard to find at the wrong moment. along with that, a trash bag of any kind should be carried. Finally, carry snacks in there so that you don't have to dig around to find them.

Summary - This is all advice from a Backpacker so there will be many things you don't need on every hike but could save your life if you get caught in a bad situation, many of the objects I recommend are the same. If I'm close to home or not going out too far on a day hike, I usually carry a Knife, Be Free Filter, Lighter/Stove (depending on mileage) an extra coat, and extra food, but each hike and hiker are different. You will eventually find a system that works well for you, but it's always good to carry things that make life on the trail easier and can get you through a night in the wild. With thought on my comment, you should also check out the Ten Essentials as they will almost always be worth their weight.

If you have any other questions feel free to ask!

u/shorthairtotallycare · 1 pointr/ehlersdanlos

That's a challenge, sorry I didn't address that. I just would strongly, strongly advise not rushing into some mad plyometrics or anything like that. I wish I could tell past me the same thing, it's so hard to heal after injury :/

I have IBS - I manage it with diet, but have seen that some use psyllium fiber supplements to help. If (like many here) you have IBS also, maybe that would assist with it? Because, psyllium fiber also apparently expands in the stomach. Which might cause some bloating but might also help you feel more full.

Can you get any protein into your carbs at all? Any protein would help with hunger. I sometimes have eggs with rice and a bit of soy sauce. Fried, but you could mix them in so they're less noticeable. Could do something similar with pasta. Greek yogurt? Cheese?


When I resistance bands, I use these bands. As well as bands like this, for squatting and hip hingeing movements, like this.

I had a ton of PT before I got into bands, and I really recommend it if you can find someone good. Having that guidance is helpful, especially if you have injuries.

For example, before I could really do a proper row, I had to understand how to engage my scapula, and do things like internal and external shoulder rotations. Before I could properly squat, I had to strengthen my quads and hamstrings in less challenging, more isolated movements.

Most people can get away just starting any program without that stuff, but prehab (and rehab, if applicable, as it always is for me) helps to activate stabilizers and is (imo) essential for people with hypermobility. One thing I've learned is that I just can't afford to do just any off the shelf program, without tailoring it to my needs and preparing for it. And being very careful about recovery, listening to my body.

I also found these videos from the EDNF helpful
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LC-qUejV_A
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cU5KGVy6JeQ

u/greath · 4 pointsr/knifeclub

Lol, alright for example:

  • Spyderco Delica 4 FFG: For your price range this is going to be the "best" steel you can get in a near 3" folding knife (VG-10). By best I mean the best edge retention in a stainless steel. However, being over 2.5" in some places (Chacago for example) the knife will be illegal. Also, many people do not like the look of the spyderhole as it can be seen as aggressive in office environments. Also the FRN handles, while very strong, have a cheap/plastic feel to them.

  • Spyderco Tenacious: Compared to the Delica, 8CR13MOV is a "worse" stainless steel (not as good edge retention, more prone to chipping during heavy impacts). However, the extra blade length is better for many outdoor tasks (breaking down tree branches). The handle is also G10, which is slightly tougher and has a much better feeling in hand than FRN.

  • Spyderco Centofante 3: A more "gentlemanly" and "office friendly" version of the Delica with a slightly longer blade. Again, VG-10 and FRN.

  • Kershaw Cryo II: Same steel as the tenacious. Metal handles slightly tougher than G10. Flipper action has "cool" factor. The blade grind makes the tip a touch stronger than on the tenacious.

  • Kershaw Skyline: One of the most iconic of Kershaw's knives. Hollow ground blade makes it great at slicing tasks.

  • Esee Izula: Skeletonized fixed blade. 1095 Steel is significantly better than the other steels listed at "chopping" tasks as it is not prone to chipping at all. It is NOT stainless and so the blade has a protective coating over most of it. The steel will require mineral oil/cleaning to prevent rusting.

  • Becker BK 24: Similar to the Esee Izula but D2 steel which has better edge retention and more corrosion resistance than 1095. It is also much harder to sharpen. Many think the BK24's handle is also less comfortable, the sheath is worse, and there are less available after market modifications.

  • Ontario Rat Series (linked the RAT I. RAT 2 similar but smaller): Ontario's version of the tenacious. Bladeshape generally more people friendly. Another very popular beater option.

  • Morakniv Knives (there are MANY, this is just one): Highly regarded in the "bushcraft" community. High carbon steel (similar to 1095) with a scandi-grind which is great for field sharpening and woodworking. Only partial tangs so not advised to use for battoning tasks or chopping.

  • Kershaw OD-2: Gentlemanly knife with great flipping action.

    There are a LOT more suggestions I could add...
u/Rhynegains · 12 pointsr/Fitness

True Minimum:

  • Nothing

    Weight Lifting Minimum:

  • Cage / Rack
  • Bench
  • Free Weights
  • Bar

    Nice to Haves:

  • Good flooring / platform
  • Dumbbells
  • EZ Bar
  • Weight Tree
  • Cable Machine
  • Spin Bike
  • Pullup Bar (if not included in cage)

    ----

    Check out /r/homegym

    You asked about a cage. There's good options out there like Rep Fitness and Rogue. Rogue gets pricy, but great quality.

    A great budget one (that I actually have) is this one from Fitness Reality. It's cheap, good quality, decent strength. Big lifters in competitions or going for high numbers would out pace this cage, but for those of us not going for that this works well. There's some downsides, like it is a bit smaller of a lifting area and if you want to hang your weights for storage it isn't the best (though I still do). There's also no cable attachments directly to this cage like some others have (like Rogue). It's a simple cheap good quality cage.

    A good weight and bar starting set is the Dicks Sporting Goods set. It isn't pretty, and you'll want to replace the bar after a year, but it's worth the price and I still use those weights.
u/BrikeSalville · 1 pointr/Fitness

I recently got the fit505 power rack for $230:
http://www.treadmillfactory.ca/fit505-power-rack

Might be sold out now. It looks identical to the AmStaff one, but I read a review saying that the Fit505 one was much better. Though they could in fact be identical, not sure. Anyways, I'm very happy with my fit505 power rack... but I've heard some bad things about AmStaff in general.

In terms of weights, you might be better off on Kijiji if you're near a big city. You can find used weights for 50 cents a pound (no tax).

Then maybe pick up one of these bars:

https://www.amazon.ca/Barbell-Olympic-2-Inch-1000-Pound-Capacity/dp/B001K4OPY2/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1481343523&sr=8-7&keywords=cap+barbell

http://www.fitnessdepot.ca/H11OTO1027676/strength/bars/olympic/northern-lights-black-oxide-olympic-bar-86-28mm-44lb-1500lb-rating-bbocfitltgb.html#.WEuB6vlVhBc

You'll also need a bench. Again, I would look on Kijiji and find a used bench. You can get an alright one for around $100 or a good one for around $200.

Your best deal is to buy a full used set from someone on Kijiji if you want the best value. I live near Toronto, and I've seen people selling a rack, bench, bar, weights, lat pulldown, few extras, etc. for around $700. Generally you can get things for about 1/3 of the retail price... so that's by far the best way to go if you're looking to get the best bang for your buck. But it takes patience, and you need a vehicle for transport.

u/pointblankjustice · 10 pointsr/bugout

There is a lot wrong with this list, so I'm just going to work down it one by one with my thoughts on the matter.

USB flameless lighter? Why? That is going to be unreliable, at best. Throw a few BIC lighters and some stormproof matches in there and be done with it. IF you want to be fancy, get something built to be rugged, that will stand up to use in the field:

https://www.amazon.ca/Ultimate-Survival-Technologies-Floating-Lighter/dp/B00C85NBA6/ref=sr_1_2?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173178&sr=1-2&keywords=camping+lighter

Speaking of, I didn't see any sort of firestarting material. Warmth is going to be important, and you need as few steps as possible between you and fire. Get some quality firestarters. I am trying to keep all my links relevant from amazon.ca, so some of the brands I'm most familiar with aren't there. But these work well (though there are options from Wetfire and other brands that take up less space):

https://www.amazon.ca/Ultimate-Survival-Technologies-Fire-Stix/dp/B00C6SHODK/ref=sr_1_20?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173338&sr=1-20&keywords=emergency+fire+starter

What is with the mall-ninja "tactical" hatchet? That is a lot of weight and not a lot of utility. You'd be better served with a reliable and lightweight folding saw, and a good full-tang fixed-blade knife. Something like a 7 inch Corona saw:

https://www.amazon.ca/Corona-Cutting-Tools-RS-7041/dp/B00004R9YN/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173467&sr=1-1&keywords=corona+folding+saw

If you insist on carrying a hatchet (and their function in a bugout situation is debatable, especially for the weight) get something quality like an Estwing:

https://www.amazon.ca/Estwing-E24A-14-Inch-Sportmans-Sheath/dp/B00BNQR4SG/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173510&sr=1-1&keywords=estwing+hatchet

Nothing wrong with duct tape, but you'd do well to wrap just maybe 3-4 meters of it around a small core (like from doggy waste bags, or even just around itself).

The self-crank radio/flashlight/phone charger is shit. You also don't need four lights, especially if all of them are crap. Buy one good flashlight, and maybe one good headlamp.

A flashlight like a Nitecore P12 or something that runs on an 18650 and offers long runtime would be ideal. If you buy a diffuser cap for it, you can replace the lantern. Pick up some spare, high quality 18650 cells, as well. The P12 has SOS and beacon modes, which will run for days at a time, in addition to a nice throw and excellent brightness on Medium and High.

https://www.amazon.ca/Nitecore-Flashlight-Lumens-Meters-Distance/dp/B00PQE1D2E/ref=sr_1_2?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173859&sr=1-2&keywords=nitecore+P12

As for headlamps, those don't need to be super bright. You want something with enough brightness and floodiness to work around camp. But ideally you also want a red-light or low-light mode for night time, when you don't need to destroy your night vision just because you need to take a piss or something.

https://www.amazon.ca/TACTIKKA-CONSTANT-LIGHTING-HEADLAMP-DESERT/dp/B00GCGIGHK/ref=sr_1_14?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173989&sr=1-14&keywords=petzl+headlamp

The powerbank thing in the crank radio is crap, only 1000mah. Not enough to charge most modern smart phones even 25%. Figure that of that 1000mah, ~25% will be lost just due to inefficiency in the charging process. Get a 10,000mah or bigger high quality battery, with 2.1A ports, and be done with it:

https://www.amazon.ca/Anker-PowerCore-Portable-Ultra-Compact-High-speed-Charging-Technology/dp/B0194WDVHI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482173708&sr=8-1&keywords=anker+usb+power+bank

Combine the money you'd spend on the shitty folding knife and the shitty Gerber multitool, and buy a proper multi-tool. You don't need two folding knives.

The Leatherman Wingman is a good value, though I prefer a nicer quality one like the Charge TTi, but at four times the price it may not be worth it just for an S30V blade.

https://www.amazon.ca/Leatherman-2996-831426-Wingman-Multi-Tool/dp/B005DI0XM4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482174264&sr=8-1&keywords=leatherman+wave

Ditch the camp toilet paper, that stuff is like wiping your ass with cardboard. Get some biodegradable camp wipes from an outdoor store. You can now use these to clean your ass, and they also are useful for wiping your hands, or taking whore baths.

Same with the camp soap. Are you bugging out or camping for a week? Nothing you are going to do in a bugout situation is going to necessitate body soap. Toothbrush, floss, deodorant.

Ditch the giant first aid kit full of crap you don't need. Those things are heavy and 80 of the 85 pieces are just different sized bitch stickers. Build your own first aid kit tailored around the likely injuries you would face: sprains, cuts, burns. Maybe throw some Quik Clot Z-pack gauze or a tourniquet (CAT or similar) in there for larger trauma, if that is a concern to you. Limit the bitch stickers to 5-10. All gauze, tape, trauma pads, alcohol wipes, tincture of iodine, moleskin for blisters, tweezers, surgical shears, gloves, maybe burn cream. Small containers of medications you might need: aspirin, antihistamines like Diphenhydramine, anti-diarrheals, etc.

That survival paracord bracelet thing is garbage. You already have 100ft of paracord in your list (which you could probably cut down to 50ft). You don't need some shitty firestarter, whistle, and compass thing. Buy a real lensatic sighting compass. Not going to do you much good without a map and the ability to understand it, anyway.

https://www.amazon.ca/UST-Survival-Essentials-Lensatic-Compass/dp/B005X1YI3Q/ref=sr_1_5?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482174799&sr=1-5&keywords=compass

You have both a cookset AND a mug/pot. This is extra redundant and not needed in a bugout situation. Stick to food you don't have to prepare. Caloric density is your friend. Jerky, EPIC bars, Clif bars, etc.

If you need to boil water, use a single-wall metal canteen (NOT a thermos). Remove the plastic lid, fill with water, set in your fire. Widemouth canteens like those by Klean Kanteen are multi-purpose (multipurpose is your friend). You can sterilize water, you can cook and eat food out of it (because of the large opening), and you can fill with hot water, wrap in a sock, and warm your sleep system.

https://www.amazon.ca/Klean-Kanteen-Stainless-Bottle-27-Ounce/dp/B0027W6WHE/ref=sr_1_sc_4?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482174908&sr=1-4-spell&keywords=klean+kanteen+widemouth

You don't need a can opener if you have a good multitool.

Lifestraws suck ass. They only work as a straw, and I am going to guess you don't want to get your water by drinking out of puddles exclusively. Get a Sawyer Squeeze mini filter. This can be used in-line with a hydration bladder, can be used like a Lifestraw, or can be used to filter an fill your water storage containers/bladder:

https://www.amazon.ca/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175065&sr=1-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

One seriously lacking area for you is your sleep system. A tarp and a space blanket are not going to keep you functionally warm. You might survive a night, but you won't be useful the next day.

At the BARE minimum, you should get a good, reflective, breathable bivvy sack, like this one from SOL, AND a sleeping pad. A bivvy will reflect heat back onto you, helping with heat lost through convection, but no sleeping bag will help with heat lost through conduction (you touching the cold ground). That is why a sleeping pad is mandatory. I have used the Escape bivvy and the Klymit pad linked here together, and both kept me comfortably warm to about 50 degrees F. Below that, I've had to augment with base layers or jackets, and that still sucked. If you are hoping to sleep in below freezing temperatures, you'll need a properly sorted ultralight sleeping bag.

https://www.amazon.ca/Adventure-Medical-Kits-Escape-Bivvy/dp/B00EVGD0FQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175280&sr=1-1&keywords=SOL+escape

https://www.amazon.ca/Klymit-06SVGR01C-Camping-Mattress-Green-Grey/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175199&sr=1-1&keywords=sleep+pad

Other recommendations of mine would be to take survival, medical and foraging guides and put them on a smartphone, along with a GPS mapping software and pre-downloaded offline topographical maps at 1:24k resolution of your main bugout areas and 1:100k resolution elsewhere. Something like Gaia GPS for iOS or Backcountry Navigator Pro for Android:

u/thisaccountmaybemine · 2 pointsr/xxfitness

I recommend using this. It's basically the same routine as you posted but has warm ups included and videos, so it's a little better. :) It's what I've been using for the past two months.

Anyway, your questions:
/u/ideograph is right for 1 and 2 Except that rest periods should match your goals. < 90s rest is best for endurance, < 3 minutes is best for hypertrophy and 3-5 is best for strength.

For 3. The video is what you should be doing. You can start off by using doors - the /r/bodyweightfitness FAQ has a fair amount about that. A pull-up bar can also be used like the one you linked. Or, if you get one that doesn't need to be attached to the door frame like this then you'd need something tall to put your legs on.

u/freedoomed · 1 pointr/knives

OK, i looked into your sharpener a little more and it is not as bad as i thought. the way yours works is it has a spinning diamond coated wheel and the plastic housing guides the knife at the correct angle against the diamond wheel. This style of sharpener won't destroy your edge like a carbide sharpener will. However diamond is very aggressive as an abrasive material. This means that you are probably taking off way too much material from the edge of your knife than you need to. This means you are shortening the life of your knives. This sharpener also only has two stages of sharpening which means you are not getting much of a polish on your knife edges. The higher the polish the more of a slice you are getting as opposed to a rip. This is both good and bad. cutting some materials requires a more 'toothy' edge to the knife but if you are slicing meat you don't want a toothy edge.

In short what you have is adequate for the average kitchen. if you want better results you will need to upgrade to a better sharpener.

The work sharp is basically a miniature belt sander. by having replaceable belts you have a sharpener that basically has an unlimited life, those diamond wheels will eventually wear down. by having replaceable belts you are able to change the abrasiveness of the belt. when sharpening a knife you want to move to progressively finer grits. this grit progression will ensure that you are not spending longer than you need to on finer grits and it will get you a highly polished blade edge. the work sharp belts are flexible which means you will also get what is called a convex edge. so instead of being a perfect V the V will be bowed out slightly. this provides a much stronger edge due to the shape. the wheels in the chef's choice will grind to a concave edge or what is known as a hollow grind. a hollow grind provides a much thinner edge. thinner edges tend to be sharper but they also tend to chip and not hold their edge as well as a convex edge.

amazon has the lansky sharpening system for $36 http://www.amazon.com/Lansky-Deluxe-5-Stone-Sharpening-System/dp/B000B8IEA4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1406820039&sr=8-1&keywords=lansky+sharpeners

the lansky system will provide you with similar results to the work sharp in terms of edge polish and sharpness but it will give you the standard V edge. these clamp style sharpeners are very popular because they work really well. with a clamp style sharpener you will spend much more time on a single knife than with the work sharp.

u/asev0 · 4 pointsr/Fitness

I don't think many people appreciate just how much of a workout you can get from doing calisthenics. You won't be able to walk into a gym and do heavy lifting, but calisthenics will definitely get you in shape.

Upper body:

  • Pushups (standard with hands at shoulder width; diamond with hands at center forming a diamond to emphasize triceps; wide with hands wider than shoulder width apart to emphasize chest)


  • Pullups, if you have a bar or ledge to use. You can buy something like this that easily swings into your door frame, too.
  • Situps/crunches (and variations), leglifts, jack knives

  • Planks

    Lower Body:

  • Squats (do them slowly; your upward movement should be just as slow as going down. Do not pause to rest at the top. Push yourself to do one more than you can handle, rest, then do another set)

  • Lunges (same thing)

  • Wall-sits


    For a quick workout, I'd recommend doing 'pyramids'. Start by warming up (quick jog around the block, or run up and down the stairs a few times). Then pick a few exercises. Jumping jacks, squats, lunges, pushups, situps, and leglifts are a good place to start. You can add various add exercises, like different kinds of pushups as you progress. Then start with a number like 15 or 20 (depends on how much you can do and how long you want to exercise). Do 15 of each exercise, then 14 of each, then 13 of each, and so on all the way down to 1.

    This is actually a warmup we would do sometimes at my dojo, and it's one hell of a warmup. It doesn't take too long but it will tire you out.

    Also, you have many things around your house that could be used as 'weights' which would be helpful for squats/lunges/etc. Find a heavy textbook, a gallon of water, etc. As long as you do enough and you do them right, squats with a gallon of water is more than enough to get your legs burning.

    Anyway, good luck and don't let a "lack of resources" stop your progress. You can get a good workout without a gym.
u/uski · 78 pointsr/preppers

A few more ideas :

I would suggest having a battery-powered FM radio (and extra batteries if it's battery powered, or get one which charges via USB like the one I linked) to listen to the news and get vital information.

Also (if not too late), order a sawyer mini (best) or lifestraw (not as good). If you don't have access to clean water it can help you stay healthy (beware of chemical contamination which cannot be removed by these).

If you have the money, get a Garmin inReach satellite communicator (requires a (relatively cheap) subscription, down to $15ish a month). You can request SOS (much like 911), and send/receive SMS and e-mails, even without cell coverage. Excellent to keep in touch with relatives and in case of emergency. Can be used year-round when hiking, snow-mobile, skiing, ... Don't tell anyone you have this...

Download the offline map of your area on Google Maps on your phone beforehand. Can be priceless to navigate around and doesn't require internet access. Also get the Maps.Me app and download the map of your area too. Google Maps offline maps will expire and disappear from your phone after 30 days (I believe), Maps.Me maps will not.

If the cell service in your area is out of order, use your phone in airplane mode so that it doesn't continuously and desperately looks for a cell to connect to, which will drain the battery VERY quickly. Also use it on the lowest practical brightness setting to save battery power.

If not too late, get big USB power banks (>=10000mAh such as this one) and fully charge them beforehand. It's good as barter items and it can be nice to recharge your things when you have no access to a generator (on the go, or if you don't want to run the generator to avoid attracting attention). You can also get USB lights (this one for instance) and your powerbank doubles as a flashlight with a very long battery life.

Get a first aid kit, and not just one with bandaids... Get a CAT tourniquet, trauma dressing, Celox (preferred) or QuikClot bandage, triangular bandage, SAM splint, ... and know how to use them. Also get the basic medecines (stomach/diarrhea relief, basic painkillers, anti-allergy, and any prescription medecine if you require any). Remember 911 service may be unavailable for some time and you need to be able to take care of injuries. Tourniquets save lives, everyone should have one readily available.

​

I am a radio amateur and in these situations I like to have one or two portable radio for two-way communication but I realize it is not for everybody. Still, a pair of FRS/GMRS radio can be helpful. Please note that GMRS requires a (cheap) license in the USA. I would recommend this model which also allows to be used as a scanner and to program the NOAA weather frequencies (do it beforehand) and some local police/EMS/fire frequencies (if allowed in your juridiction).

Please DO NOT use a radio made for amateur radio use, where you can transmit on any frequency, such as the UV-5R; you may interfere with emergency communications, even if you can't hear them, miles away. Please stick to the FRS/GMRS frequencies. The radio above guarantees safe operation and still allows to be used as a scanner.

​

Take pictures of all your important documents (ID, properties, ...) and store them in a waterproof plastic bag. Try to keep at least your passport and driver license with you during the storm...

If you have a sump pump, try to arrange so that it can be battery powered and/or connected to your generator. If using battery power, get a battery charger and/or a generator connection, if the outage lasts and the battery runs down. Sometimes homes are not affected by the main storm but are flooded due to the lack of power around the storm and are still ruined, and that's totally preventable.

Also, beforehand, depending of the situation you might want to BLOCK your main sewage pipe. This way you might avoid sewage backflow into your home. There are normally valves already installed but in case of serious flooding (high backpressure) they sometimes are not up to the task.

​

Download a few offline movies on the Netflix app (if you have Netflix). I never lived though a hurricane but I assume after a few days/weeks, you might want some entertainment. You can also download e-books. Bonus if it's survival-related e-books.

​

Hope this helps... good luck to those affected


PS: oooo, thank you stranger for the gold, I think I never had one before ! Happy prepping :)

u/bdnicho · 10 pointsr/guns

>Do I need to get ear protection for a .22? If so, any suggestions?

Yes! .22 still produces noise loud enough to damage hearing, especially long term use. [These] ( http://www.amazon.com/Howard-Leight-R-01526-Electronic-Earmuff/dp/B001T7QJ9O) are a great value for the money.

>What eye protection is the best? (What do y'all use/what's your favorite pair of goggles)?

Nothing fancy, as long as it's rated for shooting.

>How long should I wait before getting a scope?

Until you have a need for one. If you get into longer range shooting and you can't see the targets naturally.

>Should I store it vertically? (Corner of a closet)?This is my first gun, so I don't have a safe, would under my bed work? (I did get a case for it)

Vertically is fine, though you should find a way to lock it up. If you can't afford a safe right now look for a cabinet you can lock and bolt to the wall. It won't stop a determined thief, but it'll deter curious house guests, children, and smash and grabs.

>Can I plink in my backyard? (Harris county, Texas)(I'm pretty sure this one is a no, thought I'd ask anyway)

I don't know your local laws, but unless you have several acres and a solid backstop it's not safe regardless of whether it's forbidden or not.

>I'm a first generation gun owner in my family, I'd like to be responsible with firearms, if I missed anything important, please say, I'd love to hear suggestions on how I can be responsible with guns.

Look in to Appleseed shoots. They're an excellent way to improve your marksmanship.

>I don't know if it matters but I got 1 box of CCI .22lr and the Ruger BX-25 with it.

Your 10/22 will love CCIs. Other brands work, too, but CCI is usually consistent.

u/IceCreamFeeling4 · 1 pointr/guns

The Smith & Wesson M&P9 is the best overall pistol currently available in my opinion. It had zero gun-caused malfunctions in a 2010 ATF test. And yet it's still very reasonably priced at around $450. This website will help you shop for them online (if you order it online, you'll need to find a local FFL dealer for them to deliver it to and pay a transfer fee). Any Federal HST cartridge should perform well in it. Since that ammo is hard to find, this website will help you find it in stock online (and yes, ordering ammo over the internet and getting it shipped directly to your home is perfectly legal). Here's my favorite inside the waistband holster. And here's my favorite outside the waistband holster. I recommend buying this hearing protection and this hearing protection (yes, you should wear both at the same time. And yes, you'll still be able to hear everything perfectly fine if you put the volume on maximum). Here's the safety glasses that I recommend. And here's the lubrication that I recommend.

Open carry is legal in Virginia. You don't need a permit. You do need a permit to carry concealed.

u/Call_Me_Salamander · 3 pointsr/UCDavis

When it comes to books, you should always wait until the first day of class so the professor goes over what you will need for the course. For some classes you might not even need a book at all! You will not be using the book very much if at all the first week of the quarter so you will be perfectly fine waiting until the first day or two to order your books! I recommend avoiding the bookstore because it tends to be overpriced. Amazon has much better deals if you want a new book. For used books, join the Textbooks for Sale Facebook page, which is part of the UC Davis groups on Facebook. Also, many people obtain their books in PDF format online or through others who have taken the course. While this is not legal, it does provide for a very cheap alternative to buying your books (but again, it is illegal in most cases unless the publisher has explicitly released the book online in PDF format free of charge!)

I live in West Village as well actually! If you are in a furnished apartment you will get a bed, desk, nightstand and dresser to yourself. You also get a TV stand, living room table, dining table, and a sofa included that you will share. I recommend coordinating with your housemates on what to bring. That is what I did and it is way better than bringing 4 sets of silverware, plates, etc. Is there anything specific you'd like to know about that you should bring? The bare minimum (computer, clothes, kitchen utensils) is what I brought and I am doing just fine!

As for bikes, I recommend a single speed or standard road bike for commuting. The commute from West Village to the middle of campus on bike is 5-7 minutes depending on how fast you biking.

If you are looking to spend under $300 then buy a nice, used road bike when you get to Davis. There is a Bikes for Sale page for UC Davis on Facebook that is regularly updated! Craigslist works fine too. If you are looking to spend $300 or more, ($300 to $500 can get you a good quality bike that will last you throughout college) I recommend checking out this website: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/road_bikes.htm

I personally ride a Single Speed and I love it! It has no gears so you don't need to worry about shifting. It is lightweight, fast, and reliable. I have the Windsor The Hour from BikesDirect (it was $300 when I got it). I recommend the Mercier Kilo TT if they have it in stock (it is extremely popular so it is hard to find in stock). Otherwise the Dawes SST AL and Windsor TheHour/Clockwork are great too!

Let me know if you have any other questions!

Edit: I almost forgot! Thanks for reminding me /u/nTranced. A good U-lock is a must in Davis. Bike theft isn't extremely common but it does happen from time to time. If you have a nice bike make sure it is locked up with a U-lock. I personally recommend this lock as it is a good combination of price and effectiveness: http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1405012899&sr=8-1&keywords=kryptonite+bike+lock

u/roy-orbison- · 33 pointsr/gshock

DW-5600E is the basic (but still great!) no frills square.
Tells the time, has alarms and stop watches, counts up and down, an auto backlight, and calendar to 2039. It's dive rated to 200 meters, and has an electronic luminescent backlight, much like indiglo if you have a Timex.

GWM-5610 is all of the above, along with world time, and has the two biggest features for some: solar charging and atomic radio syncing.
For many, this is the THE "square." It's robust, self sufficient, and has a classic look without looking too dated or too ultra modern. The display is slightly different than the 5600E.

GLX-5600 is most similar to the budget 5600E above but has an additional bit of display for tide and moon information. Still as tough, still as cool looking.

GLS-5600 is a more recent, stylish variant of the 5600E. It come in 4 neat colors (black, white, green, and sand) and features a moving seconds complication on the face. Also, it features a "Low Temp LCD," this LCD is rated to go to -20 C. Honestly as you're wearing it on your person, a normal 5600E can go pretty cold as it also has your body heat. Possibly most importantly for some people, this model comes standard with strap adapters and a really comfy clothes NATO strap standard.

GWM-5610-1BJF is the Japanese only, blacked out model of the radio/solar 5610. These can be imported pretty easily through Amazon, so of cost isn't an issue, don't let the import bother you. The Japanese models also usually feature slightly more supple, softer resin straps and a screwback case, like on a mechanical time piece.

While not exclusively a 5600, if you need a big honkin' watch, the GX-56 is basically a thick 5600. Huge buttons and case, has all of the features of a 5610 with a cool moving seconds graphic like the GLS.

Many of these can be found in various colors and feature variants, so as a recap/guide:

5600 - standard square G Shock

5610 - radio/solar square model

GLX - surfing/tide model

GLS - stylish colors, comes with NATO strap

GX-56 - huge "King" G Shock

BB after model number - blacked out model

JF after model number - Japan import

Hopefully this helped. I had a lot of fun making this.

u/AManAPlanACanalErie · 2 pointsr/chefknives

Yeah, in that case, one good chef's knife is the way to go.

At the sub $100 price range, here are my standard recommendations:

  • Victorinox Chef's Knife. This is a western style chef's knife, probably what you would imagine in your head if you said chef's knife. The blade geometry is great. Its a very easy knife to care for - its 100% synthetic handle doesn't mind getting soaked and the steel is very stain resistant. The steel is pretty soft, so its easy to sharpen to a serviceable edge. The down side - its steel is pretty soft, so you will need to sharpen it more often to get good performance out of it.

  • Tojiro White #2 series These are Japanese style knives (and made in Japan). They are entry level for hand forged knives. The fit and finish isn't the best (not terrible) but this is to kitchen knives what a Remington 870 is to shotguns or a 10 year old F150 is to trucks. Look at the Santoku or Gyuto style blades. Upside - I believe its hand forged, so warm fuzzies on that if it applies to you. Hard steel takes a better edge than the victorinox, and will need sharpened less often. Downside - You need to commit to caring for this knife. Its not difficult to do, but neither the handle nor the blade like water. The handle is wood, it will warp, swell, and rot if you leave it soaking wet. The blade is not stainless steel. This means you must wash and dry it right after use, or else it will rust. But its pretty easy to do. Once you are done with your cutting, walk to the sink, give it a quick rub with a soapy rag, dry it on a towel and you are done.

    Then, spend the rest of your budget on sharpening stones. No matter what knife you get, you need to sharpen it to keep it functional. This is a reasonable system if you don't feel like you want to learn how to free-hand sharpen. This is a reasonable stone to get if you do Youtube will be more than happy to show you how to use either one.
u/sharxattack · 1 pointr/ftm

My thoughts exactly; I have an Iron Gym, and it is by far the single best purchase of my life; you can do wide-arm pull ups, close-arm pull ups, chin ups, palm-facing pull ups, stick them in a doorway for sit ups/crunches, dips, modified pushups/planks... The possibilities are endless. And you can move it to wherever you want to go, which is another benefit that you don't get with a regular bar that you have to fix in place.

My personal opinion is that the human body was designed to get in shape on its own and also develop a level of muscle that correlates to its own bodyweight; equipment is nice and all (especially for those hard-to-work-out areas like lats), but bodyweight exercises are hands-down my favorite kind of workout. Other equipment is superfluous.

The same goes for supplements/powder; if you eat a good diet with enough protein in it (especially things like nuts and eggs; those are pretty much the food of all good muscle), the supplements become sort of just an added expense. Sure, they help you get built super quickly, but why bother? Why not just have a good diet? Just my opinion; I'm a big fan of all-natural.

Now if anyone has any tips to get rid of this damned beer gut... It seems I do cardio and ab workouts like none other and this fucker still refuses to let go of my abdomen.

u/tappman321 · 8 pointsr/Watches

If you want a chrono, a Seiko SSB031, mecha-quartz is a good value for $125. You get a smooth sweeping chrono hand, which is nice to have on a quartz watch. If that doesn't fit your style, you can look up different SSB models to find one you like.

If you want a field watch, Citizen Men's BM8180-03E is a nice quartz watch for $90. You can get a Timex Expedition for cheaper, but I think the Citizen is a better value for the price point. The Timex Waterbury is a nice watch for $100-$150, and I really like the look of the watch (might be overpriced for what you get but I just really like the look).

And also check out some G-Shocks. They don't get much love here, but I honestly think if you just care for a watch you can use, and don't care about looks, a DW-5600E is the best watch you can get in your price range.

u/Charming_geek · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

Hey all. Relatively new to the ultralight scene, but have been trying to go lighter weight over the last few years. Will probably still be a while before I'm true ultralight (6lbs for the big 4?), but my current plan would have me at 7-7.5 lbs for the big 4. Was curious about your input / any suggestions for improvements:

  • Tent - Naturehike CloudUp2 (owned) - $120, 3.30 lbs (shared with wife, 1.65 lbs)
  • Pad - Klymit Static V (owned) - Bought for $50, 1.15 pounds
  • Bag - Mountaintop 40 Liter Hiking Backpack (owned) - Bought for $27 in an amazon lightning sale, 2.05 lbs.
  • Sleeping bag - Hyke & Byke Eolus 15 degree 800 FP down bag (plan to buy) - $150, 2.54 lbs

    Overall, $350/7.4 lbs for the big 4. I definitely know there's room for improvement and I will probably be replacing things as I can afford it. The most obvious place for improvement is the bag, but I'd actually bought one for my wife as a temporary hiking bag for our first hike-in camp together but we ended up both really liking it. It's comfortable and for $27 it was hard to pass up, especially as it has all the compartments I like in a hiking bag (i.e. access to the bottom section for the sleeping bag). Welcome to criticisms and suggestions.
u/Flagrant_Geek · 1 pointr/CampingGear

The closest thing I used to a life straw is the "Soldier water filter". An ultra small membrane type filter built inside a real tiny hand pump.

While it worked incredibly well as a filter, as a pumping device it sucked. Took circa 30 minutes of minutia pumping while crouched by a water source to suck up a single liter of water.

To me those straw, look more like a last resort type of water filter for similar reasons. They probably work well as a filter but are rather tedious to use. They have a truly limited use scenario.

Also because of it's method of use you are likely not to be fully hydrated as you will likely not drink as much as actually needed for long hikes in hot weather, as it's designed to be only used at the water source. Water sources can be rather far apart. Good sucking skills are also required.

I have images in my head of sucking that straw until I turn blue with my face suspended a few inches above the lake or river bank attempting to suck water then sliding and falling into the water while simply attempting to have a drink.

I don't know about you but it seems likely to produce some rather comical photo opportunities for other hikers while simply attempting to get a drink.

I personally used the Katadyn 6L base camp water filter (The revised Version #2) and found it an amazing high speed device that allowed me to filter enough water to fill my 3L bladder and cook dinner and breakfast as well as provide water for other hikers with me. This each and every night at base camp. This in a mater of minutes. it filters really fast. An entire days supply only takes minutes.

Aside this I would perhaps consider the Sawyer squeeze filter, which is somewhat similar but designed for smaller quantities of water. You don't have to suck until you turn blue.

Simply fill bag and squeeze, Around a liter per squeeze bags and is about the size of a life straw while stored in your bag. This is the real economical yet highly functional solution. Small, compact. The only draw back is you have to do this multiple times a day. Other than that it's the perfect kit.

Katadyn and a few others make better hand pump type water filter that are more usable than what I had. However they are truly cost prohibitive and I personally cant see why pay this much makes sense for me.

In the end for me it's a gravity filter, less work, fast, more quantity per water pull from lakes and rivers and fast easy filtering. It is a real blessing to have ease of use, when tired and having to setup camp and prep food etc. I cant say a single bad thing about that filter, yet.

Albeit I have read some rather bad reviews on the same filter I use, but so far it's not my experience with them. Not a single issue ever...

u/[deleted] · 5 pointsr/AskReddit

Getting defined abs is not the greatest fitness goal. For a man to have really chiseled abs you'll need to have less than 5% body fat, which not only requires rigorous exercise but strict nutritional discipline.

It's much better to focus on your body as a whole; abs will come naturally the more you train. You'll burn more fat if you do what's called High Intensity Interval Training, which is short periods of intense work followed by a break.

As far as specific workouts without a lot of equipment, the basics are the best: pushups, air squats, pullups, and running. I highly recommend buying an Iron Gym, they're sturdy, cheap, and easy to use. There are infinite combinations of exercises you can do; as a CrossFitter, one of my favorite low-equipment workouts is called Cindy:

  • 5 Pullups
  • 10 Pushups
  • 15 Air Squats

    Do that in order as many times as possible in 20 minutes.

    I could go on and on, but that's a good place to start. There are all kinds of fitness subreddits, you might try looking there too. Good luck!

    edited to fix link
u/Coffinspire15 · 2 pointsr/homefitness

I've been working out at home for 6 months now with, IMO, significant improvements. I'll mention that my goal is to gain muscle, not lose weight, but you should still be able to take away something from my advice. I get a lot of my cardio from the youtube channel fitness blenders. They are super nice, easy to follow, and they have a ton of videos. I owe my budding ab definition to their videos. Secondly, I use resistance bands for all sorts of different exercises. I bought these specific ones for $25 and they're still going strong. You can double them up for added resistance as you progress. Lastly, I wound up buying adjustable dumbbells recently. They are costly, but are compact and I can change the weight in a flash. These may not be needed right away. I personally waited to get this 5 months in to make sure I was persistent with working out, so I didn't waste the money. I hope some of this helps! Good luck!

u/duffman13jws · 1 pointr/Fitness

I saw your $2k budget in another post, so here's my recommendation. I'll clean up the formatting and add links when I get to a computer.

Power rack like a Titan T-3 Short or X-3 Short if you don't want to build a platform to bolt it to. I recommend the short because they're 7' tall, the normal height is ~8ft, and you might run into ceiling height issues.

Alternatively at a budget you can get the Fitness Reality 810XLT Super Max Power Cage for $200. It's not as sturdy, but it's half the price, and comes with a multi-grip pull-up bar

Get the following attachments - dip bars, land mine, Multi-grip pull-up bar. You want a power rack even if you're not squatting because you can bench by yourself with the safeties and not worry about failing a lift. Titan sells rack-specific attachments for these, and anything that fits the Titan T-2 should fit the Fitness Reality rack.

Olympic bar and plates - I'd get a Fringe Sport Wonder Bar personally. Get plates second hand off of Craigslist for no more than .70/lb

Adjustable bench - Titan's will work, but Rep Fitness is the best in the home gym biz as far as build quality goes.

Adjustable dumbbells. I'd get the Power Blocks Urethane set that's expandable to 120lbs. Start with the up to 40lb or 60lb variant and the stand, and then buy expansions if/when you need them.

If you still have money left over, I'd pick up an EZ-B bar too - Amazon is fine for this. I just like them for curls and some other arm movements. Pick one where you like the bend pattern - there are some I prefer to others personally.

EDIT: links added

u/captainHuman · 1 pointr/CCW

I recently got my NC CCW and a Glock 19 with a vedder light tuck. I’ve been to the range to practice a few times but the ear pro they have for rent tends to be a hit or miss. As a result i’m looking to buy my own EarPro but and caught between the decision between Pro For Sho’s passive ear protection and Howard Leight’s Impact Sports electronic ear protection. If this would be better for /r/guns let me know.

Here’s a quick of comparison of each:

Pro For Sho
Price: $18
NRR: 34dB
Weight: less than half a pound

Amazon Link: https://www.amazon.com/Pro-Sho-34dB-Shooting-Protection/dp/B01FPWTJBI


Howard Leight Impact Sport
Price: $35
NRR: 22
Weight: slightly under a pound

Amazon Link: https://www.amazon.com/Howard-Leight-Amplification-Electronic-R-01526/dp/B001T7QJ9O


The Pro For Sho is lighter, about half the cost, and has a way higher NRR. I usually double up with foam ear plugs which would help make up for the Howard Leight’s lower NRR. The NRR difference isn’t the biggest concern, however, my existing opinion is that more is better. Indoor gun ranges can get loud. That being said if for whatever reason I forgot or ran out of foam earplugs I’d feel comfortable with the Pro For Shos but not the Howard Leights.

The biggest differentiator then would be the price and the electronic element of the Howards. Is the benefit offered by the electronic component really worth twice as much money and significantly less NRR? At a range the only time I’d really need to hear is when taking instruction in a class or talking with friends but if I’m by myself doing my own practice which is most of the time I feel like I wouldn’t need it. Yelling also works to account for higher NRR.

Another argument I’ve thought of is situational awareness being hindered by the passives; but the ranges in my area are all indoor with one or more rangemasters.

My biggest question to the community here is how worth it is the electronic hearing aid of the Howard Leights? I know that to some of you the price difference might be negligible but for me it matters.

On an unrelated note I stumbled across these: https://www.range365.com/sightline-replacement-pads-for-howard-leight-impact-sport-earmuffs

They look like a solid upgrade to the Howard pads. If I went with Howards I might get these later down the road when I have a bit more money to spend.


Thanks for taking the time to read through my long post!

u/nmopqrs_io · 3 pointsr/homegym

I can't agree more with your gym sentiments. Walking through a sea of resting bitch faces at the gym just to see that two people were already waiting for the squat rack tended to ruin my somewhat fragile motivation.

I would recommend against the FT2, having an enforced straight up and down bar path will not help your form and will make your workout less effective for your core/stabilizing muscles. If you're thinking you want something safe for home workouts alone, you can still do that with a free weight barbell setup, spotter arms are wonderful thing.

I haven't tried that many options, but I can tell you what is working for me. I got the titan T3 squat rack and I love it. I highly recommend the spotter arms, I try for bench personal records all the time by myself and I've never had issues when I failed. This rack is stable enough for pull ups but you don't have to screw it to the floor to install. I did have to take off both the weight storage arms so that the plates on the storage arms didn't impede my bench press. http://www.titan.fitness/cages-and-racks/squat-rack.html

For the barbell I got the CAP OB-86B, it's reasonably priced and I'm not doing anything too fancy with the olympic lifts. I expect to get another, better bar and keep it as a beater bar eventually. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001K4OPY2

My plates are a mix, I recommend getting some bumper plates off craigslist or a local shop to get started then adding bumper and iron plates as needed. Another option is to get the $300 iron set from Dick's as a starting set, but from what I've heard the bar is fit only to trash/resell. http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/p/fitness-gear-300-lb-olympic-weight-set-16fgeu300lbstwth7brb/16fgeu300lbstwth7brb

For bench I'd recommend getting something strong and adjustable. I got the flat Adidas bench and it's fine, though I now want an adjustable bench so I can do incline/decline. https://www.amazon.com/adidas-Performance-Flat-Training-Bench/dp/B00WHIG6X8

Appropriate flooring, resistence bands, and dumbbells are also incredibly helpful.

u/Erik618 · 1 pointr/Watches

I like your style. I was in your exact position only a few months ago.

That being said. I landed on the Nomos Orion Weiss /w Sapphire Case Back ^[1] ^^^^everybody ^^^^circlejerk and I can tell you that it is exactly what I was looking for.

I have a soft spot for subsidiary seconds and a 3/4s plate. Honestly I don't know why it took me so long to pull the trigger on it.

I understand it's manual wind, but this is not a bad thing. It allows for a thinner case design, making it a purpose built timepiece rather than a confused one that is trying too hard to tick all the boxes.

I'm going to order the Casio G-Shock DW5600E-1V ^[2] when I feel like it so that I have one for sports and one for casual.

You'd be surprised how perfectly 35mm sits on a 7.5" wrist. It's an incredibly versatile watch and you get your moneys' worth, best value in the industry IMHO.

My recommendation would be the Nomos Orion (your color preference) 35mm /w sapphire back and supplement the purchase with the Gshock.

More Pictures to help you decide. [3] [4] [5] [6]

Total Cost: 1399£ + 50 USD

I have 7.5" Wrists and Nomos Standard band fits perfectly with room to spare.

u/Ksrugi · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I grew up in Louisiana and always had these at the ready in case another Katrina came by. Barebones and lightweight in case you need to get up and move.


Multitool - Something that's sturdy, offers plenty of options, but also is lightweight. If I got washed out, this would be one of the top things I'd want coming with me.

First Aid Kit - You just never know. Water can hide a lot of nasty stuff like sharp metal edges, broken glass, etc. The kit I've linked to also comes with a multitool.
Water Filtration System - Dehydration will get you before anything else. Southern heat combined with physical exertion takes a lot out of anyone and tiny filtration systems like this will take care of you without adding bulk.

Meal Replacement Bars - You'll ideally want a few days emergency food. I recommend meal replacement bars that are high in protein and fiber and no less than 500 calories. They'll provide decent nutrition and should make you feel satiated for at least 2-4 hours. I don't have a recommendation on this one because there are so many brands and flavors.
Hand Crank Lantern - A reliable source of light that you can crank on your own. Generally, I avoid using generators and the like. I'm paranoid about electricity after flooding occurs.

Whistle - Great for alerting people without tearing up your vocal chords. It's also very, very, very good to have in case animals that shouldn't come by are nearby.
Dust Mask - If your city floods, there's going to be a lot of crud that comes up from the sewers and a lot of things accumulating inside buildings. Save your lungs and your noses.
Portable Battery - I love this age of technology we're in. Charge this a few days before the storm hits and you'll be able to keep your phone charged for days if the power goes out.
Insect Repellant - The ample amount of still water after a hurricane is prime bug nesting. A little repellant goes a long way.
Paddle Your Own Canoe by Nick Offerman - Or any book really to help pass the time. This is a fantastic read though. :)

u/Prospero424 · 4 pointsr/houston

If you're sharpening a fine, expensive blade, I can't stress enough that you should do it yourself. I used to send my knives out for sharpening with a handful of services, some of which were expensive and had excellent reputations. Sometimes they would come back great, sometimes they would come back absolutely BUTCHERED. One time it looked like they had sharpened it on the machine they used for lawn mower blades.

Anyway, there's no substitute for a good, multi-stone sharpening system. If you've got a lot of commodity blades to go through (like if you run a restaurant kitchen), by all means use a service or use a motorized sharpener like the Work Sharp (I own one and use it regularly).

But if you want the finest edge you can get and you want to really take care of a nice, expensive chef's knife; sharpening in a way that won't mar the appearance or take off too much metal each time (like the Work Sharp is known to do), a multi-stone kit is the way to go.

I've always used the Lanksy kits and absolutely love them. Here's an excellent general-purpose kit: http://www.amazon.com/Lansky-Deluxe-5-Stone-Sharpening-System/dp/B000B8IEA4

And don't worry, it's super easy to get the hang of. The guide included will take care of the angle for you, which is the hardest part. And there are short videos out there that detail the process, if you need them.

u/Rocket_Puppy · 2 pointsr/EDC

What do you use the Skeletool most for?

If you use the knife on it constantly and daily, then yeah, get a good knife. If the stuff that you do cut makes you nervous with the Skeletool then definitely get a dedicated knife.

If you use the bit driver or pliers on the Skeletool the most then you probably don't need to carry a dedicated knife.

Give the Sage 5 a good look as well if you are considering the Para3. I'd also strongly recommend finding a Spyderco/Benchmade/Zero Tolerance dealer and fondling a bunch of knives before making a decision on which knife to buy.

If you have never carried a dedicated knife before it would be a good idea to buy a cheaper knife or two before spending $100+ on a knife.

Could try something like the Spyderco Byrd Cara Cara 2:
https://www.amazon.com/Spyderco-Cara2-Lightweight-black-PlainEdge/dp/B0049AYJP4/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1499523866&sr=1-1&keywords=Byrd+Cara+Cara2

The Ontario Rat I/II
https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Knife-Sp-Black-Folding-7Inches/dp/B00BBPAOCW/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1499523684&sr=8-2&keywords=ontario+rat+2

https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-8848-Folding-Knife-Black/dp/B0013ASG3E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499523956&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=ontario+rat+1&psc=1

Kershaw Cryo
https://www.amazon.com/Kershaw-1555TI-SpeedSafe-Folding-Knife/dp/B0074FI28Q/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499523664&sr=8-1&keywords=kershaw+cryo

CRKT Squid
https://www.amazon.com/Columbia-River-Knife-Tool-Folding/dp/B00TFY39EQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1499524020&sr=1-1&keywords=crkt+squid

Try some under $30 knives, pick one that looks like something you would like to carry, and pick something that is dang near the polar opposite. It will let you know what you like in a knife much cheaper. Differences in blade size, blade shape, handle shape and how they are used might change your opinion on what you think you need in a knife after using a dedicated knife for awhile. After that you can make a truly informed decision on a high-end knife.

u/anachronic · 6 pointsr/camping

I love my Klymit. The thing folds up to the size of a Nalgene bottle and is way more comfortable than you'd expect. I'm 5'10, 190lbs and like to sleep on my side and sleep great on this.

Other alternative (which is decidedly NOT convenient and is bulky, but is insanely comfortable if you're going car camping or using it stationary in your apartment and don't need to lug it around) is getting a memory foam mattress like this. I pull this out when friends crash at my apartment and they have all raved about how comfy it is. It's also great for cold weather camping, since the foam is a great insulator. I had this one on a trip that got down to 37 overnight and it kept me super toasty.

u/Rauldisco · 2 pointsr/knives

When cleaning a knife, don't use abrasives that will scratch the surface. Use water and soap and a towel, dry it completely with a dry towel, than use a good lubricant (WD40 is not recommended) to completely lubricate all of the moving parts of the knife. Be careful not to use too much lubricant or gunk will build up. Put some lubricant or oil on the blade to protect it from rust.
Next, you will need to know how to sharpen. Most of the people around here use either the Lansky Sharpening System, the Spyderco Sharpmaker, or freehand sharpening stones.
I use a set of free hand sharpening stones and a leather strop with a polishing compound to polish the edge. This is the edge of a knife I just sharpened today http://i.imgur.com/rU9xiiB.jpg
As you can see, the edge is a mirror and is razor sharp. I taught myself how to sharpen and it is kind of hard to explain it in words because each of those systems for sharpening above use different methods of sharpening. Because you seem to be a beginner, I would recommend buying the Lansky System http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000B8IEA4/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1421722347&sr=8-1&dpPl=1&dpID=51w1Ufl-%2BUL&ref=plSrch&pi=AC_SY200_QL40 because it is less likely to mess up your edge than if you use free hand stones. Also, if you buy the Lansky, buy the stand for it as well.
After sharpening, oil the edge once again to protect it from rusting.
Remember to always keep as much moisture and liquid off the knife to prevent corrosion and always clean it with soap and water if it gets dirty.
Also, if you are interested in a leatherman, I recommend the Charge http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0031Q8N40/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1421722507&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SY200_QL40&dpPl=1&dpID=41K-6jvKBjL&ref=plSrch because even though it is pricey it is known as one of their best models.
I hope this all helps you!
EDIT: I also forgot to tell you not to use a knife outside of its intended purpose. It sounds like you tried prying with your previous knife, which ended up bending its tip. Never pry with a knife, next time it may break. Don't cut metal wire with a blade, use wire cutters. Don't use the edge a a screwdriver, that cause damage too. Remember to always use the correct tool for the job, which is beneficial for you because the leatherman will have many small tools.

u/netchemica · 1 pointr/ar15

Electronic hearing protection will not only amplify your surroundings so that you can hear your game better but it'll prevent hearing damage.

Howard Leights are great, you can get gel cups for them for more comfort and better sealing. The HL's often dip below $40, but even at $50 they're a great buy.

I personally use MSA Sordin Supreme Pro X's and 3M ComtacIII's depending on the occasion. They're both pretty great. The MSA's amplify a little more than the ComtacIII's, but they cut off all volume during gunfire. The ComtacIII's don't amplify as much, but have slightly better directional awareness and are perfect for communicating during gunfire since they reduce the volume instead of completely shutting it off.

u/SJToIA · 2 pointsr/knifeclub

You have a lot of good choices available within the $50 range. My personal two top choices for a small, inexpensive but well built folder would be the Ontario RAT 2 and the Cold Steel Tuff Lite. Both are under $30, easy to carry, and very capable. If you want more of that traditional look, go with the best Case model you can afford. Great Eastern Cutlery is really nice too for traditionals, but a bit more pricey. Another option might be an Opinel, classy and inexpensive.

u/AceofSpad3s · 1 pointr/EDC

Okay here are some suggestions

  1. Wallet. I have not ordered it yet but [this] (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002P4Y9EW/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A28SBX2GB3VZCT) cigarette case could work.
  2. Knife: [Spyderco tenacious] (http://www.amazon.com/Spyderco-Tenacious-Handle-Folding-Plain/dp/B001EI7578/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1370136756&sr=1-1&keywords=spyderco) is $32 and a little more than 3 inches or the [Spyderco ambitious] (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004MMSDHO/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_4?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER) which is a baby tenacious with a 2 1/4 inch blade and $29.
    While they are not tactical opinels are really nice and are near $10 and come in lots of sizes.

  3. Pens: I have a [zerbra 701] (http://www.amazon.com/Zebra-F-701-Stainless-Ballpoint-Retractable/dp/B002L6RB80) and a [Fisher space bullet pen] (http://www.amazon.com/Fisher-Space-Pen-Bullet-400/dp/B000095K9D/ref=sr_1_sc_2?s=office-products&ie=UTF8&qid=1370136956&sr=1-2-spell&keywords=fisher+space+ben). For the money the zebra is excellent, the bullet pen is nice but there is a tutorial on how to mode the zebra to take space pen refills which is the best of both.
  4. I know you got the wave but I suggest getting a small mt like a sak or a leatherman ps4 or micra. The victorinox classic sd is good and about $10

    Also with all the stuff you want to carry, It might be wise to invest in a maxpediton micro pocket organizer which is about $15
    If you got any questions just ask.
u/Tofinochris · 1 pointr/homegym

Here's the details on the stuff:

Power Rack. Had this about 6 weeks and I'm extremely happy with it. Looks fine, feels very sturdy, no feeling of tipping or instability even when I hang from the bar at front. Paint scratches when you move and insert the spotter bars but what do you want for $350 shipped. It's held 215 on multiple occasions with no issues. If you lift significantly heavier than this (300+) you may want to read reviews first, or invest in a less-starter rack, but for many/most people this will be fine forever. It's dead easy to assemble if you have a socket set and if you don't, great opportunity to get one, they're cheap! Assembly can be done mostly solo but the final bits really need a second person to hold stuff in place while bolts are inserted. Rack comes shipped in 2 or 3 (can't remember) boxes which are pretty unwieldy and heavy.

I went with this CAP barbell. This suits my needs very well with great knurling and came without bend, and I'm unlikely to put a bend in it with my sub-300 deadlifts. The barbell ships in a fun 7 foot cylindrical tube which caused the dude at the mail place to nearly topple over because he expected it to be light for some reason.

I also got this plate tree which holds 2x 45# bumpers, 2x 45# plates, and 2x 25#, 2x 10#, 4x 5#, and 2x 2.5#. Does the trick but paint scratches off the pegs like crazy but is easily cleaned up. Single box, about 30 pounds.

The bench is this one by Marcy. I wanted a simple bench and that's what I got. Great bench for the price and I haven't had any instability problems. Had this for a year and used up to 70# dumbbells and 215# barbell with it (I'm 215). Most weight total that's been on it was a 270# friend benching 185# for sets and he found it fine.

Assorted stuff: got these puzzle mats which do the trick for the right price and are stowable unlike a permanent mat. As I mentioned elsewhere the 45# bumpers are meant to mitigate any floor impact, and I'm not terribly concerned with keeping this floor perfect anyway (it's 10 year old laminate on top of concrete, and the "path" is linoleum). The plates were from a sale at the local FitnessDerp store (not its real name) and were 85 cents a pound -- I never saw any on Craigslist for less than that in the month I looked. Finally just some collars.

The cat in the picture highly recommends this crinkle tunnel.

u/161803398874989 · 41 pointsr/coolguides

A lot of people are asking about pullups and whether they are optional, because "they don't have anywhere to do pullups".

Pullups are not optional. They are vital for correcting many shoulder imbalances people have. Sitting in front of the computer all day in a hunched over position weakens the muscles on the back of your torso and tightens the muscles in the front of the torso. Once you start training then, if you only train pushing exercises such as pushup, this imbalance is further exacerbated and will likely lead to injuries down the line.

As far as not having anywhere to do pullups, you'll just have to be creative. I've done pullups on trees, on playgrounds, on powerlifting equipment, on carports, on stairwells, and so on and so forth. Here are 100 ideas to get you started. Of course, you can also just buy a pullup bar. They're inexpensive (30 bucks), will last you a long time, and help you get strong and healthy. They're a fantastic investment. Don't worry about your doorframes: unless you have really abnormal rames, you can be reasonably certain this will not do them any harm.

I'd like to finish with a plug for /r/bodyweightfitness, which is a subreddit dedicated to all kinds of bodyweight training. We have a large community with super helpful veteran users, weekly threads with tons of advice and helpful info, weekly threads where users can post about their routines and their experiences with them (showreel compiled from the showoff threads), and much much more. If you do decide to visit us, please refer to the FAQ before posting, and make sure you follow the rules. Hope to see you there!

u/bobcrotch · 1 pointr/woodworking

Bit late but I didn't see this full face 3m linked. I've had this for quite a while now with varying beard lengths, down to the middle of my chest, half way down my neck, and just short. It does suck a lot with a full beard (and it leaves a pretty hilarious outline imprint). It probably also doesn't 100% work because the hair leaves more air gaps than the rubber/skin contact would.

However, I'm often also extremely lazy about getting eye pro, ear pro, lung pro on every time. So being able to toss this thing on with these is really handy. I thankfully haven't had anything kick back into my face but it is generally nice to have all a lot of the dust and crap also filtered out pretty well from your eyes too (it isn't perfect but it's better than glasses or nothing).

The cartridges are also really easy to replace. They're also really confusing as to what filters you actually need to be using. Some are rated for dust, dust + fumes, dust + fumes + ebola, dust + fumes + ebola + nuclear fallout. I've also been admittedly a bit lazy about the filters as well. I'll typically replace them when I notice the flow is starting to get really bad, which also seems to fog up the mask a bit.

My only real gripe with it is that static / aerosol over spray (whatever, basically anything) can cause crap to cling to the mask. So I'll go to start working on something only to discover I need to go track down some windex and a clean rag. Not a huge deal. I just grabbed a rag and tossed it in a ziplock and put it on a shelf next to a small bottle of glass cleaner stuff.

And for the ear pro stuff, those are seriously amazing. I use them for shooting and have always loved them. One day I thought "huh, I wonder what a table saw sounds like while wearing these". Turns out pretty not bad. I normally end up just turning them on super low with earbuds in and they're comfy.

u/RikVanguard · 3 pointsr/IWantToLearn

I've had a lot of luck with the Lansky Sharpening system. I also recommend the little spindly mount if you don't have a vice. It isn't really necessary, but I find it makes sharpening a lot easier.

There are a lot of videos out there, but this is the one that helped me the most. I know it's not recommended to sharpen a knife by moving the stone backwards (from tip to handle) but I've tried to replicate his methods and had fantastic results.

That said, it takes some practice to develop a feel for how much pressure to apply and what motions to use. It took me about a month of not-really-sharpened knives to realize that I wasn't using anywhere near enough force with the coarser stones to form a burr. This guy outlines how to feel a burr pretty well (the whole video is a bit long, but definitely helps with some little tricks.) I also run my nail along the length of the blade to feel for a fully-formed burr.

Other than that, just keep practicing and trying new techniques, and find what is most comfortable and efficient for you.

u/killswitchendave · 3 pointsr/P90X

I've done both. I started p90x in 2010 to lose weight to join the military. I started doing 4 push ups. 0 pull ups around 210 lbs. Followed the diet and workouts religiously. Got down to 170. Could bust out 50 push ups and 10 pull ups no problem. Loved p90x. Changed my life. Fast forward a few years. In the Marines, still in great shape although I added some belly fat (can still run 3 miles in around 20:00 minutes and do 20 pull ups) and got p90x3. Dropped from 200 lbs to 180. Much easier diet routine to follow and 30 minute workouts are fast and really effective. I got in even better shape. If I wanted more, I combined two workouts. Did an upper routine then lower, or weightlifting and cardio. (Doing 2 workouts is still only an hour) Tony talks a lot, sometimes I'd do 5 burpees in between sets. There is a lot you can do. Only complaint is no dedicated arm day. I felt like I got in better overall shape, but my arms were looking a little smaller than I liked. Today I dabble in it all, X,X3, traditional weightlifting, crossfit type stuff. Keeps me in great shape. Wouldn't be where I am fitness-wise without both programs. Now on to what you asked... I'd go X3. Easier to commit to 30 minutes and equally effective. Also, you can make needed adjustments for pull ups. If you have a pull up bar you can use resistance bands to assist you. You can use just bands as an alternative. Or you can use a pull up bar and a chair. (They advertise pull up assist device that is unnecessary. Regular bands will work for half the price). Bands I bought are off Amazon here...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/7245456313/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1453813788&sr=8-1&pi=SY200_QL40&keywords=resistance+bands&dpPl=1&dpID=51
-DfIKs1BL&ref=plSrch

Hope this helped. PM any questions.

u/Reachmonkey · 2 pointsr/knives

okay, so... as far as cheap sharpening goes, stay away from pull thru sharpeners they give a mediocre edge and take years off the steel.
a cheap-ish way is to get a stone but learning to free hand sharpen is a pain and can take years to truly get the hang of. also chosing grits and a good stone that wont crumble and scratch the shit out of your knife.

you can get a lansky for 35-40$

or you can get a spyderco sharpmaker for 50-60$

i use one of these for rough stuff, really bad edges and reprofiling. i would recommend this because if you arent going to be sharpening often and dont need a razor edge itll be fine.

a good strop can get expensive but honestly you can just pick one for 15-20$ and some buffing compound for 3-10$

you can also use one of these to get a mirror edge, closer to finishing, freehand sharpening again has a larger learning curve, practice on a crappy knife. seriously. you will fuck up at first. you should see my first knife, gross...

if you decide in the freedom of freehand sharpening, check out atomedges guide in the sidebar. pretty helpful.

u/Silverlight42 · 1 pointr/Survival

Depends on many things... and once you get to high quality knives, preference is a huge thing.

I enjoy ESEE-3MIL

They have one of the best warranties, but the price also reflects it.
it's 1095 high carbon steel, easy to sharpen and maintain, but can rust if you don't keep it clean.


You probably don't need a large knife for most things.

If you want to spend more on something fancy you can get a BUSSE




as everyone said... can't go wrong with mora for the price.. i'm personally not a fan though. I wouldn't say overall it's high quality, but the blade, where it matters.. is.


It's not too difficult to find a good camp/hunting knife. Like I said, mostly preference.

Just make sure you go with a good knife company or maker.

You can even find some real nice custom fixed knives for cheap from up and coming knife makers if you search around a bit.

Also, you could just get a folding knife.


if you want a super inexpensive one that's as legendary as the mora there is opinel no 8 - also carbon steel



or the Ontario Rat


anyhow, tons of options.

u/Eat-Sleep-Lift · 4 pointsr/homegym

You don't expect to lift more than 250lbs? You wholly underestimate your strength. You should be able to pull more than that on a deadlift before you max out on SL 5x5.

IF you really want to stick with lifting and not just a program but being dedicated to lifting regularly, then buy quality. Being thrifty doesn't mean buying cheap. It means getting the most out of what you spend, and good quality stuff will last you a lifetime.

Titan racks are great value, If you can't bolt the T-3 to the floor or a platform, look into getting the free standing T-3 Squat Stand with spotter arms. The T-2 cage isn't as heavy duty but still more than enough for most people.

There are other options but Titan's a good value.

As far as bars, get the CAP-OB86 which is a highly regarded barbell for it's price whihc regularly goes on sale for as low as 100 dollars.

As far as plates go, buy used if your local area has a good craigslist base. Get mostly 45s with a pair of 25s and 10s

Buy the Adidas flat bench which is a cheap but sturdy option to the more beefier $150+ dollar options

u/lucubratious · 13 pointsr/malelifestyle

Here's the TL,dr of r/malefashionadvice: https://www.reddit.com/r/malefashionadvice/comments/356ia8/building_a_basic_wardrobe_v50/

Even simpler:

1 pair of decent jeans
2 pairs chinos (khaki and another color)
2-4 simple casual shirts (polos, henley)
4 button downs (white, light blue, and some with patterns.
1 decent sweater because it's going to be cold soon (prob plain solid color in dark blue, dark grey, dark purple or another earth tone)
1 shoe (Chucks, Vans etc.)

The above is real basic and you could get this taken care of at Target, Ross/Marshalls, and prob Goodwill.


Separately, everyone your age has a lot going on and is going through some shit. We've all been there but you don't want to get stuck in a hole of feeling depressed, or like you don't belong.

Here's a few other things I want you do to that will help. Below may appear a bit random but they're solid tips that'll have you on the right track for life, allowing you to be more comfortable with yourself, and more appealing to others.

Keep yourself well groomed: showered, teeth brushed, hair combed, nails trimmed etc.

Make fitness a part of your life and that's as simple as push-ups/dips and chin-ups. Get this bar from Amazon and check out Scooby's website for some further info (or hit me up again).

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001EJMS6K/ref=mp_s_a_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1474751774&sr=8-1-spell&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=irom+gym

http://scoobysworkshop.com/pullups-for-total-beginners/

Sleep in if you want, but not too long.

Make a habit of eating "3 squares," don't need snacks everyday.

Start saying "yes" more often. Friends want you to meet them at the mall, a girl wants to talk, parents ask you to do something etc etc.

Be curious and take a genuine interest in the people around you.

Practice being a good listener.

Don't openly criticize others, at least for what they can't change anyway.





u/RJDavid8 · 2 pointsr/EDC

Papa Johns worker with Irma right around the corner.

Top Row (from left to right):

Oakley SI Half Jacket 2.0: $72 with knockoff polarized mirrored lenses bought on amazon here for $20.

Leatherman Pro Wave: Not a special edition of Wave, just bought through Leatherman's Pro program. $55 with the clip found here for $5.

Timex Ironman Classic 30: Great $30-$40 digital watch that through everything has yet to hiccup, let alone fail, once.

iPhone 7: Matte Black. I'm one of those people who actually doesn't love or hate apple of android. I just happen to have a macbook and an iPhone, and that works for me.

Otterbox Symmetry Series: Wanted a $35 case to match my phone and got one. Lint and dust all over the port openings and inside the case?! Works great, just likes to get dirty.

Oakley SI Flak Beta Prism: $117 through Oakley's standard issue, these are the steel frames thanks to some confusing customer service calls. Polarized lenses with their mumbo jumbo technology actually make colors pop a bit.

Middle Row:

Black Leather Wallet: I don't know, probably found at Kohls or something. Nothing special, just gets the job done.

Field Notes Expedition: Awesome $13 notebooks that use a plasticy paper for writing in any conditions. Finally halfway through my first book, as I like to use all of the real estate available on each page. A bit worn, but character, right?

Amazon Special Wristwatch: There's so much conflicting branding everywhere, who knows who makes it. Anyway, have had it for a while and it seems to tell time. The band is a bit weird, but what would one expect for $16?

Car Keys: RIP me. I drive a minivan. sigh. Oh well, it's what I got.

Bottom Row:

Spyderco Tenacious: Perfect $40 knife if you don't want a beater and also don't want your wallet to scream in agony. I just need a good whetstone set to be able to do it justice.

Bose Soundsport Earbuds: Stay in my weird ears. I exercise regularly, but that doesn't mean I like it. Music helps me forget the lactic acid burning my muscles. They don't make the audio-only ones anymore, so here's a $99 pair for apple devices.

Wristbands: Air Force Academy in blue and Domestic Violence in purple. I wear these because I don't want to expose myself to the world of "Etsy." yikes.

Chrome Fisher Space Pen Bullet With Clip: ~$20 and so damn slippery. Awesome pen for being a pen, but I need something more practical for greasy hands. Any ideas? Not looking for anything more than like 30 bucks.

Kizer Vagnino Velox 2: A beautiful flipper on ballbearings. HOLY cow this thing flies out with vengeance and feels like a million bucks. A true gentleman's folder. However, I am not a gentleman... I see some ugly grip tape in it's future to make up for impracticality of no serrations on the back of the blade or handle for grip. Before anyone tries to complain about a 17 yr old with a $200 knife, I found 'er on Massdrop for $82 after shipping. Would I say it is worth the 13 hours of work needed to pay for it? Yes. Yes I would.

u/ohnovangogh · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

My current setup is a BRS stove, a Snow Peak Ti-Mini Solo Combo 2, and a reflectix koozy.

The koozy and stuff sack weigh 47 grams, and the pot, cup, and lid weigh 143 grams. The stove (not counting the canister) weighs 25 grams. Everything fits inside the pot with extra room (I also keep a quarter of a scrubbing pad in there for cleaning).

I haven't gotten a chance to take the Snow Peak out yet, but I've been using the Mini Solo 1 for about 4 years now and love it. My only gripes are with the handle on the lid, and how small the handles on the cup are. Since both of these issues were fixed in the Mini Solo 2 I decided to upgrade. This seems to be idea for two people, as I can easily boil enough water for both of our meals (I use primarily dehydrated meals). My girlfriend doesn't have her own cup, so the past couple of trips I've given her the cup and ate out of the pot. For breakfast we eat first, then rinse the pot and make coffee (she's a slow mover in the morning so we're not in a rush to get moving).

Like I said I'm very happy with this system. While it could be lighter, I don't think its combined weight is unreasonable. I've been interested in giving an alcohol stove a go too, but I can never seem to get my fancee feast stove to work (the wick never seems to light).

Hope this helps!

u/NarcissaMalfoy · 1 pointr/90daysgoal

I got [one of these for six bucks] (https://www.amazon.com/Iron-Gym-Total-Upper-Workout/dp/B001EJMS6K/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1492534369&sr=8-1&keywords=iron+gym+pro+fit) which you just pop up when you want to use it. I was dubious (which is why I didn't buy it new) but it's fantastic. (The one I got looked brand new, which happens a lot with fitness equipment. People buy it and then don't use it.)

I wrote to [Dana Jeri Maier] (http://www.danajerimaier.com) who is an illustrator whose work has just a great biting humor to it. I follow her on Go Comics and Instagram and I really admire all aspects of her work. I think I may make it a goal to write a "fan letter" once a week in the next round. It's an interesting way of expressing gratitude for people's work and finding connection.

u/calmbomb · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

that bulova is great but its quartz, if you don't mind a quartz watch it opens up a WHOLE slew of different options under 200$. If I was buying a simliar styled watch under 200$ and didn't mind quartz I would probably look at Citizen Eco-Drive watches, the quality is usually outstanding and the solar feature is fun and very useful.

u/luckynumberpi · 1 pointr/Watches

Repost from an old comment of mine, but still relevant.

I originally got started with a Citizen Eco-Drive chrono. Mine still runs after 10+ years, and looks great on a black leather strap with white stitching.

It's solar powered, and Citizen's solar tech is crazy good. After a year in a box it starts ticking the moment it comes out, and with regular exposure to light it'll just keep going. No battery changes needed, and it has quartz precision. Like I said, mine is over 10 years old.

That's where I recommend starting – simple, hands-off operation. Only once you've started to develop a budget and a more genuine appreciation should you venture into the land of automatics. Going to college you definitely want to be on time, and you don't want to have to care about setting the watch every time you don't wear it for a few days.

Though I don't own any myself, Timex is a reputable low-cost vendor to consider as well. Their Expedition series is nice, as well as the some what odd Flyback. If you happen to be into pure digitals, then Casio is the king.

u/Recycle0rdie · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

First of all this is the item i think you will purchase with this order - http://amzn.com/B00006IE7L

Now for my list.... prepare to get wood ;)

  1. http://amzn.com/B003373NCO - Marble Wood, occasionally known as Cake Wood.

  2. http://amzn.com/B00C3UQZVS - Osage Orange wood, orange like simon's hair.

  3. http://amzn.com/0670759074 - Book, what wood is that?

  4. http://amzn.com/B004TNWD40 - Swedish made Mora knife. would cut through a steak as if it were water

  5. http://amzn.com/B008X2ZFG6 - Camelthorn wood, named after an animal.

  6. http://amzn.com/B0032YUTP2 - Cocobolo wood, has streaks of purple when freshly sanded.

  7. http://amzn.com/B005H59GN0 - Pocoyo Racing, a game I've wanted to buy my son for a long time.

  8. http://amzn.com/B008GUSPB2 - Masturbating to my most favorite wood species should be considered a guilty pleasure.

  9. http://amzn.com/B005G2G4D4 - A tool, this was easy

  10. http://amzn.com/B009FBJ7WM - From my childhood, Nike high tops.

  11. http://amzn.com/B009ZD6D1I - Carving set with organized display case.

  12. http://amzn.com/B00123YCQC - Carving knife set, for my hobby

  13. http://amzn.com/B00DXNYWLO - Kiridashi Kogatana blade, nerdy.... because ninjas.

  14. http://amzn.com/B007AS3PPW - Ancient Bog Oak wood, naturally black from being in a swamp for 1000+ years

  15. http://amzn.com/B004JTTWWK - Spalted Tamarind wood, sometimes known to contain streaks of pale green.

  16. http://amzn.com/B00465DUVG - Nike skate shoes, something you wear.

  17. http://amzn.com/B006HFU6HY - Macassar Ebony wood, funny because it smells like B.O when you cut it.

  18. http://amzn.com/B004JTQDM2 - Hackberry wood, comes from a flowering tree. Without bees it could not reproduce.

  19. http://amzn.com/1551052741 - Book about trees and shrubs, could potentially be used to select ornamental species for a garden.

  20. http://amzn.com/B009ZD6D1I - Deluxe woodcarving and palm tool set by Flexcut, My most favorite Item.

    Thank you so much for the contest, I had alot of fun putting this together. Happy Happy cake day /u/ask_seek_knock! and good luck to everyone!



u/HilariousMax · 10 pointsr/knives
  • ~$7-8 Sanrenmu 7010/710 - You can find these at Gearbest for cheap as hell when they have sales but they're absolutely $30 worth of knife
  • ~$10-20 Opinel no.6-12 - Depends on blade size/steel/handle wood. #6 is under 3in blade if that kind of thing matters.
  • ~$20 CRKT Drifter
  • ~$20 Spyderco Byrd Cara Cara2
  • ~$20-25 Ontario Rat II or Rat I
  • ~$30 Victorinox Cadet Alox
  • ~$30 Kershaw Cryo
  • ~$35 CRKT Ripple
  • ~$35 Spyderco Persistence
  • ~$40 Kershaw Skyline - Often on sale in the ~$30 range
  • ~$40 Kershaw Leek - Same sales as with the Skyline \^^

    Honorable Mention: Case knives. Traditional lockbacks. Hard as nails and pretty to boot. True pocket knives. Your grandfather (possibly great grandfather) had one. Good stuff the lot of them. $25-50 will get you a legacy knife that you can carry and use and then pass to your kid.

    You don't need to spend $200 to get a quality, durable, reliable knife. I've owned all of these knives at one time or another and loved every one of them. Sure they needed sharpening more often and sometimes something a little more drastic (Sanrenmus are often cheaper to replace than fix) but the value is insane. Plus, lets face facts; we're much more likely to break out our Cadet when we get box duty than our Sebenza.

    Knife enthusiasts (brothers) if there's a weighed and measured cheapo that I forgot, let me know.
u/Roketderp · 3 pointsr/knives

I'm not an expert either, just sharing some things I do.

Oils from your hands are technically bad for the steel, but it's not the end of the world. Wipe your knife with a cloth with a little bit of WD 40 every once and a while.

For sharpening, I like the Lansky Deluxe Sharpening System. I didn't think it would see much use, but now I sharpen my knives all the times. General consensus is that it's awesome for smaller knives, but sucks for big ones (anything over 5" in my opinion)

To get the little rust spots you mentioned out, just use some steel wool.

EDC knives are tools. They get used. Don't worry about if it's pretty or not. I use my SOG Trident for random things about every other day, and I have since I got it over a year ago. The Kershaw Skyline is an excellent knife.

Google "EDC Knife Care" and I'm sure you'll get tons more answers.

u/Firefoxx336 · 3 pointsr/Fitness

I'm 17 so I built my set up knowing I'd have limited space and even more limited funding. For building your own gym the most important thing to remember is that there are tons of people out there who have given up on exercising and have unused equipment lying around. You can take advantage of this by checking craigslist and helping other people reclaim space in their garages.

Remember, your body is an organic system, it doesn't care about the condition of equipment, as long as provides resistance and is safe. That is to say, new weights at Dick's will run you $0.89/lb, potentially lightly rusted weights will run you $0.40 or even less on craigslist. They go fast though, so jump on a deal if you see it and refresh a few times each day. I 250lbs worth of dumbells + a storage rack for $150 a couple days ago. In my area, that's a steal.

Craigslist also graced me with a 4 month old Bowflex Blaze for $150. 79 exercises and about 24 sq. feet taken up by its footprint. I'll take that ratio. The Blaze has a flat bench that can be set to a 45 degree incline for lifting even without the bows. Dips can be done off the side of the bench, toe-raises can be done off of the supporting floor bars. The Blaze is a monster tool. If you're going after a Bowflex (they're the safest apparatus if you're working out solo) I'd keep an eye out for the Revolutions. They run a bit higher but they use real weights and are supposed to be pretty spectacular.

Other than that I bought one of these for pullups in a doorway, and just picked up a speed jump rope for $4/free shipping on Amazon. Cheap cardio. If you've got some more cash though you can pick up almost any common exercise machine for ~$80 on craigslist. Bikes/Treadmills especially.

If you're into the protein/supplements thing give Netnutri.com a look. I have yet to find a cheaper place to buy (60% off retail) and they have an enormous selection with fast shipping. From the research I've done (my uncle co-founded the Taro drug company, he knows his shit, and I've done a ton of anecdotal reading on the bodybuilding.com forums) the best protein available is the Optimum Nutrition Pro, which packs 60g/serving with a mess of aminos. The best creatine supplement is Gaspari Nutrition's SizeOn. And the best nitric oxide is Gaspari Nutrition's Superpump250. My uncle says there isn't nearly so much credible research backing nitric oxide as the other two, and my family doctor advises against using it because it quickly dilates your veins, which means sudden lower blood pressure, which can lead to a heart attack. Both endorse protein and creatine though. Creatine has also been credibly linked to increased mental capability. Can't go wrong with fish oil for brains and joints and a solid muti vitamin either. ;)

u/fidelitypdx · 5 pointsr/liberalgunowners

> But what else should I get her? Ammo, sure. How much ammo is enough to practice for a bit? I really have no idea.

For ammo you'll want two varieties: defensive ammo and training ammo. Quality defensive ammo usually comes in a 25-round box, priced around $15-$20. You'll probably want 2 boxes of this, one to practice with and another to keep loaded in the actual/ready magazine for defensive use. There's about a dozen excellent brands on the market, I like Critical Defense by Hornady, but all contemporary 9mm defensive ammo is pretty good.

For training ammo you can buy it online. Just look at gunbot.net and sort by price. There's 3 general types and they'll all work fine: steel case, reloaded/remanufactured, and bulk. You just gotta keep an eye out on the internet regularly and find whatever deal looks good - be aware of hidden fees in shipping rates. Generally ordering ammo online is cheaper than the store, but check with your local gun store as they might sell cheap stuff. There's some puritans out there who claim issues with different types of training ammo, especially steel case - this is because they're confused and think that modern steel case 9mm is corrosive like old WW2 bulk steel case ammo was corrosive. TulAmmo and BrownBear and Wolf should all run mostly fine in your wife's Glock.

Quantity is going to vary - but you certainly can't have too much. At least 200 rounds for the first outing is good. Have her start with the cheap ammo, then before the day is over switch to the defensive loads and fire a magazine or two - this is mostly to ensure if functions in her pistol, there's not a huge difference in how it handles.

If she goes to a class the instructor will recommend or sell the ammo.

> Does it require a case or anything? A cleaning kit?

Generally a "case" for a pistol is the holster. Your gun store will sell some cheap types of holsters, and just start her with a really cheap one. When she moves to concealed carry she'll probably upgrade to one that fits her preferences of how she wants to carry and where to carry.

For cleaning you'll just need a bore brush for cleaning the barrel and a general cleaner/lubricant. Your gun store will sell some, I'd recommend Break Free CLP; it's an all-in-one spray. You actually don't really need to clean Glocks until after ~500 rounds, that's when you'll have malfunctions due to a dirty gun.

> What else is absolutely essential to buy with this gun?

Hearing protection. These Howard Leight ear muffs are extremely popular - they'll work fine for training purposes - they also amplify quiet sounds, so if there is a thump in the night you can throw these on and hear someone breathing in the next room. I've never seen someone disappointed in these ear muffs. If she's spending a long day at the range she'll also want inner-ear plugs as well.

u/PanzerRadeo · 6 pointsr/guns

Welcome to one of the most expensive hobbies you'll ever get into. It's addictive. I recommend selling blood and semen. Mixed. Doesn't have to be your own. I'll answer your questions numerically.

  1. When you go to pick up the gun you'll have to do a few things. Show ID to prove it belongs to you as well as fill out the 4473. The 4473 is the paperwork required for the NICS background check. It's easy to fill out and if you have ANY doubts or questions while filling it out, ASK QUESTIONS. Most gun stores would rather you ask questions than screw up the paperwork and have to use another copy. Hell, tell them it's your first time. Most places will help you.

  2. The gun, if it's brand new (and sometimes used), will come in a box. You don't need a case for it. Depending on your state, they might require you to bring a lock, but more than likely, it'll come with one. Some states do not allow the factory lock because they're garbage and the state law is dumb. For most long guns though, you typically won't need it to take it home.

  3. You can absolutely find low recoil slugs. There are other options, but that's just an example. Fiocchi does make good ammo.

  4. If you're going to an indoor range, I HIGHLY recommend you double up on hearing protection. That means foam plugs properly seated into your ear canal AND over ear muffs. It's good to invest in a good set of electronic ones like these. They allow you to hear but when there's an audible noise above a threshold, they will muffle it. When putting in your foam plugs, make sure you roll them in your fingers then push them INTO your ear canal. Too many people just push them into their ear while they're puffed up and that does not create the seal required to protect your hearing.

    E. If you go to the range, do not be afraid to ask a range safety officer for tips or to help you. MOST RSO's are knowledgeable. Most.

  5. You also want eye protection. Regular reading or sun glasses DO NOT COUNT. You want glasses rated for impact. If indoor, you don't want darkened lenses. I suggest regular ol' clear lenses. Affordable option.

  6. ALWAYS obey the 4 rules of gun safety.
u/north0 · 1 pointr/AskReddit

Since you don't have a lot of weight to work with, I would recommend doing compound lifts that are going to put massive stress on large muscle groups and stimulate a large hormonal response.

This is going to build more muscle than doing simple lifts. For example, if you want to train your biceps, doing curls is going to train it, but it's not going to generate a huge response since they're such relatively small muscle groups.

However, if you do 3x20 squat highpulls, you are not technically isolating the biceps at all, but the big overall hormonal response is going to stimulate muscle growth everywhere.

Also, if you can scrape together $30, buy an iron gym. Best $30 I've ever spent. It will open up a lot of new options for working out at home.

Search for these on youtube.

Squat high pulls
Squat press
Burpees


Also, just do normal squats, lunges etc while holding 40lbs in each hand.

Also, check out Crossfit. They have some interesting non-equipment-intensive workouts on there that are great.

u/beckdrop · 3 pointsr/asktransgender

Okay, I know you posted this a month ago, but whatever. I'm commenting. It's happening.

Something I've found to be SUPER helpful with disphoria and just body image issues is to get a door frame pull-up bar, like this one. Seriously,

Seriously,

get one. They're like 20 bucks at Walmart, and I think they have them for 15 at some places. They take like a minute to put together, and you just plop them on a door frame, and it will make you feel so much better about yourself. Before I got mine I had no upper body strength whatsoever, and just felt really bottom-heavy and self-conscious and terrible. When my boyfriend got me mine two months ago, I could pull myself up maybe a centimeter. But I kept working at it and now I can do two full chin-ups in a row without assistance (which I know isn't super impressive, but it's a drastic improvement). I've gained so much muscle mass in my upper body just from that thing. And it doesn't just work muscles in your arms, you kinda get more toned all over. You can also do tons of other exercises with it too. And more muscle mass means more testosterone production. I've had people tell me that even my face is looking more masculine.

For example, compare this, from May I think, to this (fourth and fifth pictures down), from a couple days ago.

I'd say it's helped me a significant amount with my disphoria. And a lot of times when it's really bad, just doing a few chin-ups makes me feel better, like I'm actively doing something about it.

Well anyways. Hope this helped.

^seriously ^though ^get ^one

u/vibeee · 1 pointr/coloradohikers

Thank you so much. Thank you taking your time to explain it to me.

I have this Sawyer. I think we might have drank some water from one of the lakes in Titans but we survived that without getting sick. We also mostly boiled it as it was really cold outside(October).

I'm definitely going to get the tablets for treating. It sounds it's good to have them in your pack.

Lastly, which USGS maps do you use? I just went to their website and I am kinda lost. I have been buying the National Geographic maps where ever I go. Are those good enough? Would they show mining sites?

Thanks again. I really appreciate you typing all of this. It's super helpful.

u/_hester_ · 1 pointr/ar15

After about 25 years of not owning anything except a bolt-action rifle and a breach-loading shotgun, I jumped into the AR-15 world nearly two years ago, and now I'm well-and-truly hooked. I'm still a huge nub, so don't take my advice too seriously.

There's a lot to learn just in one platform. But, don't let that keep you from getting both an AR and an AK.

Learning AKs feels overwhelming for completely different reasons than ARs. That said, I am always impressed with how well my AK performs, and how comfortable it is to shoot.

If you haven't already, head over to /r/ak47 and check out the buyer's guide so you don't make a big mistake early on. The oft recommended WASR 10 is considered the best starter AK for the money. Lurk /r/gundeals for a shot at getting one on sale; they've been seen for less than $550 recently which is better than they were pre-election.

I do have to caution you: Accessories and customization for an AK is a completely different game than ARs. You might find that your "cheap plinker" rifle ends up costing you more to trick out, resulting in the same net cost-of-ownership as an AR shooting slightly more expensive ammo. If you end up happy with a stock AK, though, it's a great investment, and a welcome break from sending .22 cal downrange.

All that said, I think if you're picking a semi-auto purely on the basis of budget and having fun hitting targets, this is what I would highly recommend (after wasting a lot of money on stuff I didn't like):

u/kowalski71 · 1 pointr/AskMen

I have a basic arkansas stone that works very well at what it does... but I'm not necessarily a pro at what I do. Hand sharpening on a stone requires you to hold the knife at a very constant angle while working it through a relatively complex motion. Very difficult to get a good edge but if you practice and get the skills it's the cheapest and most versatile method of sharpening. Most people (definitely myself included) also need a decent preexisting edge to sharpen as they can 'set' the knife on that flat. Much harder if the existing edge is crap.

What I have for quick and dirty sharpening is a Lansky set. A bracket clamps to the knife and holds a rod (attached to the stone) at essentially a constant angle to the blade. It has some issues so I don't use it on the knives I really care about but it's good for really quickly bringing a beat knife back to a decently usable edge. I use my Lansky set on kitchen knives.

However, if you're willing to spend a bit more money, the Spyderco Sharpmaker is a very well reviewed product. I suppose this is my 'Everest' tip as I don't actually have one but I'll buy one eventually, when I have a particularly profitable feeling month. The idea here is that it's much easier to hold a knife vertical than at some obscure angle like 27 degrees. The put the sharpening stone on the angle then essentially do a 'chopping' motion along the stone to bring an edge in. It solves a lot of the problems of the Lansky but doesn't require as much skill as just a stone. These are rather well regarded in the knife community, though those guys still go after hand sharpening.

u/BraveLilToaster42 · 5 pointsr/JustNoSO

You got this. Start sneaking the things that matter to you into the truck you want to take so long as your wife won't notice (i.e. put the tarot deck you like in the glove box). It's not much but it will feel like something.

One trick I've heard from people who voluntarily lived in their cars was that they joined a cheap 24 hour gym so they could shower. When you're ready to leave, check Good Will for secondhand camp gear if you need it. If you want to splurge, this is the one I used at a music festival. It was great.

If you feel like putting down roots on the east coast and need a safe place to park, give me a buzz.

u/random19 · 2 pointsr/AskMen

He's 16 and 6'1, as long as the gym has a squat rack and a bench press area, he should be able to do a very good workout uninterrupted. He doesn't need a trainer.

Have him look into some programs, like Starting Strength, Westside for Skinny bastards (excuse the name, it's a really good program) or something like that.

Depending on cost, you could probably buy a decent squat rack

http://www.amazon.com/Powerline-PPR200X-PowerLine-Power-Rack/dp/B000VLRVSC/ref=sr_1_3?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1367956247&sr=1-3&keywords=power+cage

And used weights online (~50c per pound of plates).

Add a bench to that and he can bench in the power cage without needing a spotter.

It may end up being cheaper than a years subscription to a franchise gym, and he won't have to worry about feeling embarrassed. (Although going to a gym regularly is a good way for him to eventually feel comfortable with his body).


He's 16, and pumping with testosterone, he can really take advantage of it, and even if he won't be "amazing" looking by the time high school is over, if he keeps up with it he can start college fresh with a body he will love. And the confidence that comes with being happy with your body.

u/matthewrozon · 1 pointr/backpacking

You do not have to spend a lot. Here are some suggestions that I choose to use even though I could spend the money on more expensive gear.

Pack: Rent until you decide you want to do this a lot and have already bought the rest of your gear

Tent: rent it for this trip if you don't already have one. If you do, it's best to split it up, poles and fly for you and tent for him or vice versa

Sleeping bags, bring them if you have them or rent

Stove: http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Ignition-silvery/dp/B00ENDRORM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396264963&sr=8-1&keywords=backpacking+stove Works just as well as the 50$ one.

Water filter: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396265006&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini+water+filter cheap, durable, no moving parts to worry about and it's super light

Pot: A lot of people use this, but it might be a bit small for you depending on what kind of food you're going to cook but this works well for freezer bag meals http://www.amazon.com/Stanco-Non-Stick-Grease-Strainer-Black/dp/B000MVTIOQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396265044&sr=8-1&keywords=grease+can

Long Johns and other clothing: Walmart usually has decent options. Make sure that they are synthetic. You may find that you already have a few things if you look through your clothes at home. Depending how thick they are your snowboarding socks might make good hiking socks or if you have long underwear for snowboarding they would be useful camping.

What are you doing for shoes? Do not waste money on boots if you don't already have them. 90% of trails can be done in good running shoes and 95% of trails can be done in light hiking shoes.

Misc hints: For water bottles just re-use old gatorade bottles, those nalgenes are super heavy. Think about getting two hiking poles instead of just walking stick but this is a preference thing. Avoid cotton at all costs and have fun!

u/Prosapiens · 4 pointsr/EDC

Gorruck 34L GR2 Coyote Tan - a good bag, heavy, uncomfortable, probably give it to my grandchildren in like 50 years

Flip Flops - generic things

Bigblue 28W solar charger - very good, can charge my battery up during the day if i leave it in the sun which I've never really done honestly

Jakemy hardware tools - seamed useful? i've never needed this

Army glove shells - i thought i used these a lot and were indistructable but now that i think of it, i don't use them that often and are probably pretty cheaply made.

Sharpie, pen, all weather notebook - probably should switch over to a fisher space pen...

Straws - these are probably already broken.

Whistle - really really really loud

Fire-striker, matches, lighter - i'm not sure i have enough ways to start a fire

Fresnel lens - ok, now i have enough

LED flashlight - i used to go running in the middle of the night with this flashlight, its tiny

LED flashlight - this isn't the one i have but looks kinda similar? i don't remember where i got mine

Earbuds - generic cheap earbuds

Leatherman Surge - given to me by my wife for passing the bar. thanks wife!

First Aide kit - i put mine together from stuff i've stolen from friends houses whenever i go over and use the bathroom

playing cards - these look very similar to the ones i have, they are plastic so they won't get rained on

glasses/ sunglasses - i have really bad vision

personal hygiene kit - aahhhh dry shaving

Sawyer Mini / syringe, collapsible canteen (dirty), heavy duty straw - i've never used this

collapsible canteen (clean) - i've never used this either

sewing kit - i've used this a lot

ID tags - i guess if i get blown up they'll know my blood type?

garbage bag - for when my pockets are full

elastic bands - i use these when packing to keep rolled socks and things from falling apart

Salt - i have nooooo idea why i have this

cooking grate - i'm not going to hold meat over a fire with a stick like some sort of caveman

heavy duty ziplock bag - in case my mapcase breaks and other reasons

rip-patch - leftover from when i needed a pack because i bought a crummy cheap inflatable sleeping pad.

Army Fleece Beanie - i always keep this at the top of my pack

4 Bungie Cords - not the one i use but similar. to make a field-expedient shelter

Trowel - for disposal of biological wastes

Lensatic compass - because GPS should only be a backup

Pocketboy 130 folding saw - i have a bigger one for yardwork, this small one is really great

Tent stakes - for tent staking

Ravpower 26800 Battery - use this all the time can fast chage my stuff

Battery Battery holder, cables, wall charger - all fits togehter like glove!

Army Poncho - wear it, make a tent out of it etc

Microfiber towel - not the one i use but similar. i mainly use this for when the kids accidentally fall in a lake like they tend to do for some reason

Down Jacket - cheap chinese knockoff... i feel bad for not buying american

Wet weather top - not sure this is worth the space/weight

Wet Weather bottom - not sure if this is worth the weight/space

Silkweights - PJs! and warmth

Jungle Blanket - this is a lot better than the army's woobie. lighter and warmer

Gransfors Bruks Wildlife Hatchet - again, gift from wife. she wanted me to chop things and be more manly, generally. now i come home with parts of wildlife for her to cook

Map of New England - or, how i stopped worrying and love dismounted land navigation

PT belt - keeps me safe in all situations

Compression straps - i don't like lashing things to the outside but i guess i can if i wanted to

Fork and Spoon - stole these from the kitchen. i'll probably be replacing this soon with something titanium.

​

EDIT: i just priced it out: $1,585.08 total

u/frenzyboard · 2 pointsr/knives

The delica is a pretty great option for whittling. It's a high carbon blade, so it holds up to wood fibers and hard use pretty well. It's got a solid lockup and zero blade play, so control and safety are taken care of. But honestly, it's a better EDC tool than a carving knife.

Another good option I'd throw out for you are high carbon mora blades.

You might also dig this. It's specially made for wood work.

u/BraTaTa · 1 pointr/guns

I'm also a new shooter for about a year now. I try to go at least once a month to the nearest outdoor place for rifle and hand guns shooting. So far, many of the other replies have done a great job so i'll just chime in with my recommendation for the ears protection. Right now, i'm using these 3M Peltor Combat ARms Earplugs. They're working well for me ever since I got them as a gift from a friend. I bought 3 more just so I have backups. I have one on me at all time, one in my range bag, and one in my car. Before that, I also use the Howard Leight R-01526. The Howard Leight earmuff are also great for its price. However, I don't like it for long session because of my big head that get squished too tightly if they're on for 20min or longer. It also gets in the way when i'm aiming down the iron sights. Other than comfort wise, the Howard's are fantastic in its operational purposed. If you can, try them both then decide which system works better for you. I have them both and most prefer the 3M more because it's has less profile while in use.

u/IAmNotCreative101 · 4 pointsr/loseit

First off, the beer belly will be one of the last things to go, but adding additional workouts will help to tone muscle as well as to burn additional calories.

Assuming the 8kg barbell is similar to that link where the length is approximately 6ft (2meters).

There is a couple of pieces of equipment you would need to have to make full use of the barbell:

A rack of some sort to hold the barbell, and for an easy place to put the barbell when ending a set. You don't need one this extensive, it is mainly that you need something to put the weight on when done with sets if you want to add bench/incline/decline press. Which leads to the next piece of equipment:

An adjustable bench so that it can be useful for multiple exercises, including, but not limited to bench/incline/decline press.

Probably more weights to add to the barbell as well, since 8kg (~17lbs) is not that much weight once you start lifting for a lot of workouts.

Some basic upper body workouts I would focus on (given that you are running a good bit so I am assuming you are doing both distance and sprints).

If i am not mistaken you are looking for reps of 12-12-10 while trying to increase weights on each set. Generally doing that is for more endurance muscle, while doing less reps is for more explosive muscle if i am not mistaken.

Bench press

Decline press

Incline press

Barbell shurgs

Barbell curls

Close Grip Barbell curls

Standing Military Press

I would probably workout 2-3 days a week, doing all that you can. If you want to slightly lower the number of workouts you can alternate one of the curls, and alternate only doing two of the bench/decline/incline presses.

But barring having more weights/a rack I would probably recommend adding burpees in addition to push-ups.

u/Pseudo_Stratified · 1 pointr/Fitness

I've always hated going to the gym fighting with other people for equipment and altering my exercises around what is available. I also let the distance from my house creep in as an excuse. It resulted in a lot of fuckarounditis and quitting for long periods of time. Best thing I have done was get some proper equipment for my garage. I am addicted now.

I had some weights, a bench, a short olympic bar, and two olympic dumbell bars I got off of classifieds awhile ago. The bar sucked since it was so small. I never got into using it for years. I decided to finally get a real bar and a power rack. I also supplemented my olympic weights a bit. It has made a HUGE difference in the quality of my workouts. The power rack allows me to push myself a lot without the use of a spotter.

Below is the equipment I got and can absolutely recommend all of it. The bar has the perfect amount of knurling to not rip your hands up. The weights are not works of art, but cheap and perfectly suitable.

PowerLine PPR200X Power Rack

Body Solid 7-Feet Olympic Bar

Cap Barbell Free Weights

Lockjaw Olympic Barbell Collar

My bench is kind of a shitty bench that came with all the other junk I purchased earlier. Not sure what would be good if I was in the market right now. You can modify the power rack to hold some of your plates, but a weight tree isn't expensive and laying weights on the floor isn't a problem at first. A pad is pretty much necessary for dead lifts and you can pick up 3/4 inch rubber horse stall mats at those farm feed store for about $45. Get on a program like SS and this is all you need until you decide to move to splits, giving you plenty of time to slowly add more equipment as you find it.

When I finish SS I will pickup the Ironmaster 75 lb Quick-Lock Adjustable Dumbbell System and I already ordered the Powerline PLA200X Lat Attachment, both of which get great reviews.

Overall you will save a ton of money on membership fees in the long run and it's really hard to make excuses to not workout. The equipment is a joy to use.

u/cupcakegiraffe · 2 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

For quasi-anonymity, would it be possible to not state where I go to school?

If so, I'm on my second year as a transfer student in animal science. I love animals and I love caring for and spending time with them, so this degree will allow me to be paid for doing what I love. Some possible career options would allow me to be able to work with animals and people, helping them to have a mutually beneficial relationship.

I walk every day to school because my bike lock rusted out and I don't trust that my lockless bike on campus would be there when I returned. I would enter for a lock for my bike so I can have either a few more minutes of study or sleep, depending on the day. Thank you for the contest. =)

u/Taboggan · 2 pointsr/knifeclub

Well, I prefer a lighter EDC, so i'd recommend the

  • Kershaw Skyline

    This one is a very nice EDC for most people who use a knife for lighter tasks such as box cutting, opening packages and the like. I would not recommend this for someone who tends to use their knives for "heavier duty" tasks.

  • Kershaw Leek

    Pretty much the same recommendation criteria as the Skyline, but this knife is both spring assisted, and has a more "delicate" point.

  • Spyderco Delica

    Probably one of the most recommended knives for someone who wants an overall solid EDC at the price point with a lot of versatility and good overall durability. I own one myself, and this one is great for EDC.

  • Ontario RAT 2

    The Ontario knife company really hit it out of the park with the RAT series, the Ontario RAT model II is a better choice for EDC over the RAT model I, mainly because the knife is a bit smaller putting it at about 2.75" blade and less "intimidating" for someone who needs for EDC.

  • ESEE Izula

    I really like the Izula as a fixed blade EDC knife, it's a fucking tank and you can be sure you can rely on it everywhere, but it does lose some versatility and convenience because it isn't a folder.

    --------------------------------------------------

    Please keep in mind that these are just my suggestions and reviews, if you have any questions, please don't hesitate to ask me anything.
u/SuperDuperCereal · 3 pointsr/loseit

Make your body straight and stiff as a board (or plank) and hold yourself up off the ground.
Here is a great explanation: http://www.abs-exercise-advice.com/plank.html

You could get one of these pull-up bars to work those lats, arms, and back better at home. You can even hang and get some core workouts in by lifting your legs. Cheap and very useful.

You absolutely can bike for 30 minutes instead of walking daily! That's probably better than my 2 x 1mile walks, actually. Keeping that heart rate up for 30 minutes daily will REALLY help your metabolism.

Be very strict about your diet and workouts. Force yourself to hit that bike daily and get those workouts in. Also, try to stay active at least one day on the weekend. You can do this shit, man! You don't have to eat like a rabbit on keto, just NO CARBS. You are the only one you can count on to shed that weight... nobody else will help you. STAY DISCIPLINED! Even when the office has donuts, pizza, etc... don't give in with "just one".

YOU GOT THIS!

u/Yeahnuld · 2 pointsr/homegym

Not sure what the availability/pricing/shipping will be in Greece but I'll give it a shot and try to fit your budget or come close

Most of the Squat stands on Amazon have a 390 lb capacity, this one claims to have a 200kg capacity for $65.99 (USD) :
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01KXD53XC

You could probably save some money if you get just a flat bench, I can highly recommend the rep fitness one(this one is a bit more expensive) , but if you want incline I'd say the titan adjustable bench is good for the price $114 and a 650 lb capacity
http://www.titan.fitness/incline-bench-650-lb-capacity.html

Pullup Bar for $25 with a 300 lb capacity https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001EJMS6K/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_pTQtybE7R7S4Z

As for a barbell, I know you are into powerlifting, so if you are willing to raise your budget I'd recommend the Rouge Ohio power bar ($250), it's solid and will last. If the budget is tight, and since plates haven't been factored in yet I'd look for a weight set that comes with a barbell and then buy some extra 45s after. Might come with a shitty bar but if you're careful with it it might last for a while. This is something I'd recommend buying in person since shipping will kill your budget.

I left out the dumbells since Olympic pairs are kinda expensive and i wanted to leave plenty of room for plates, but if you need them there are a bunch on Amazon for $30 per db.

Also I'm not sure if Craigslist exists in Greece but if it does or if something similar exists I'd look for some good deals on there. Good luck

u/DREADLOCKSS · 4 pointsr/bodyweightfitness

Ya legit gymnastics parallel bars are expensive. I have a iron gym pull-up bar and MDUSA rings but i hang my rings on a beam in a garage. I also have hanged them on a branch of a tree (make sure it's sturdy), on swing sets with the swings moved out of the way, on monkey bars, and on a football goal post. All were very succesful getting enough height and room on the sides is the most important which is why monkey bars actually work better than a narrow pull-up bar.

If drilling isn't an option then buying some sort of pull-up bar to hang them on is probably your next best bet. An iron gym is pretty cheap and with a couple of nails you can secure your doorframe extra if your worried about it being flimsy although my apartment doorframe does fine. You could also do a power tower for pretty cheap.

u/TRTBrandonSchaub · 1 pointr/Bowyer

It's really important that you get a tool that's right for you. As you notice, I don't recommend planes, the other guy did.

I have reasons but they are mostly my own. For eexample I wouldn't recommend planes because they will only work when working on straight grain. The moment you encounter a knot, you'll be struggling. And on top of it, planes are expensive and only the expensive ones are worth getting. A cheap drawknife or rasp works fine but a cheap plane is gonna make you cry.

Now, you were saying you don't wanna file for 10 hours. I think you're a little bit mistaken about rasps. You will probably be surprised how quick a good, coarse rasp is. They can devour wood. The reason why you need a rasp is because there will be spots in wood where the grain is running off. A cutting tool will struggle to cut when grain runs off but a rasp will still work.

Alright, I recommend the following. Get yourself a rasp. I have no particular recommendation. Check out ebay and see if you can get one there. If not, get one from harbor freight. Look for a big one. Possibly these 4-in-1s.

Then, get a Morakniv knife. The company is famous for making high quality bushcrafting knives. These knives are absolutely amazing for working on wood.

And a knife is better than a plane or drawknife if you don't have a workbench. Just place the wood against the ground and your foot and use the knife.

On Amazon for $14, the companion. https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40

It's one of their cheapest and great. They come with a scandi grind. It's the best grind for woodworking and easiest to resharpen.

u/bluesatin · 1 pointr/bicycling

After quite a lot of research, I've taken the plunge on buying a road bike for general use after not riding a bike in like a decade... Decided to splurge on a B'Twin Triban 500SE (shop link that'll probably inevitably break), rather than deal with the hassle of trying to find a second hand bike locally and deal with potential repairs etc. And of course for my own personal vanity of liking minimalist designs, the bike's look is perfect for me, I'm not the biggest fan of the more traditionally bright decals etc.

It'll be the first nice bike I've had as well, I had a massive mountain bike thing when I was a teenager but never used it off-road, considering I'm a slender fellow it weighed a tonne and wasn't much fun to use. It'll be interesting to see what a light road bike will be like. Can't wait for it to arrive! :D

I've been trying to make sure I don't forget any of the essential accessories I'll be needing. So far I've ordered these:

  • Multi-tool
  • Puncture Repair Kit
  • Mini-pump
  • D-Lock with a cable loop
  • Helmet

    Things I need to look at:

  • Lights Bought a NiteRider Solas and Lezyne Super Drive XL for lights.
  • Oil
  • Cover (since there's barely any room in my flat, might have to sort something out if I'm not using the bike often in Winter or something).

    Is there any other essentials I'm missing? I imagine there might be a lot of tiny things that I'm missing, stuff like reflectors.

    Also recommendations for the stuff I'm missing will be appreciated, I just bought some good rated stuff off Amazon, no idea if the reviews are completely wrong, I know they can be for some products I'm more versed in.

    Also any tips for someone's first ride in a while, and especially first time on drop handles? I've done some basic research on how to hold the bars and use the Microshift gear levers, but I'm sure there's little tips that might help.
u/ocp-paradox · 1 pointr/airsoft

> I can't really recommend any cheap walkie talkies, but i can help with some of your other questions. The helmet rails are called ARC rails, and some things you may want for a helmet setup are any push to talk button with kenwood style pins for the baofeng, a set of hearing amplifiers/ comm headset like howard leight impact sports, and any 3.5mm to 3.5mm cable to connect the ptt to the howard leights so enemies can't hear your comms blaring out of the radio.

Thanks that helps a lot. I'm wondering though even without a license is anybody really going to care / would it even be a problem just using it for games every other weekend? Not like I'm gonna get a knock on the door from the cops about something like this am I? Won't other people in the games be using the same setup?

These helm attachments + Headset = yes? And just any radio really for example = all good to go?

u/son2tweets · 1 pointr/Watchexchange

Hi guys,
Today I’d like to offer up a few well-priced pieces I no longer wear. Prices included Con. US shipping. I take PayPal (F&F preferred) and have good feedback here.

Without further ado, here’s the photo albums w/ timestamp: https://imgur.com/a/YiEaH

Orient Mako Orange -$110 SOLD
The Orient Mako line is well-known for punching above its weight class, and the Orange dial version is probably my favorite (I prefer it to my Gen 1 Orange Monster). This iteration also happens to fairly sought after, as eBay vendors are asking $197 and up (there’s an Orient Mako XL for $148 for bigger-wristed folks).

This watch keeps good time and is good cosmetic condition. Crystal is flawless. Bezel (a common problem with Orient divers) clicks smoothly. Case and bezel inserts has minor use marks. Watch will come on the pictured Nato strap as well as the OEM bracelet that’s sized to 7” wrist. 41mm case x 22mm lug width.

Pics: Wrist shot 1, Wrist shot 2, Closeup, Lume shot

Citizen Eco-Drive AT0200 Field Chrono - $65 SOLD
This is a popular and well-reviewed field watch, and for good reasons: almost fool-proof Eco-Drive tech, one of the more legible chrono dials I’ve seen, robust lume, and nice touches such as the red second hand and matching red WR100 text. 39mm x 20mm.

My sample is well-kept and in good cosmetic condition. Crystal has a tiny hairline scratch near the 2 o’clock marker. Cases has normal wear marks. Caseback is spotless. Watch comes on an unworn NATO band.

Pics: Wrist shot, Closeup 1, Closeup 2, Lume shot

Seiko Solar SNE039 - $58 SOLD
I love mechanical watches as much as the next guy, but it’s nice to have a grab-and-go quartz when you’re in a rush; if said quartz watch requires minimal long-term maintenance due to being solar-powered AND also bears a tasteful design, all the better! This was almost my exact rationale for getting this watch, only to receive something similar from the Mrs soon after that I end up wearing instead.

Watch is in near mint condition and bracelet comes with all links. Please refer to this Amazon product page for more information. 37mm x 19mm

Pics: Wrist shot, Lume , Closeup

Let me know if you have any questions. Thank you for your time.

u/Lightning14 · 1 pointr/Fitness

I recommend getting a pull up bar (it's great for pull-ups, chin ups, push ups) and doing 3 sets of this workout, with pull ups added in. Starting out, you won't be able to do all the reps recommended, but just find what your limit is and do that. As you get stronger then you can increase. This regimen got me into pretty good shape before I recently started going to a gym and doing Wendler 5/3/1. And as /u/requires_distraction said, read up on /r/bodyweightfitness.

Edit: Also, diet is just as important as exercise. Make sure you're getting about 1g of protein for each pound of body mass, and you can calculate your approximate caloric needs here. I don't know how much detail you want to go into in tracking your diet, but using myfitnesspal to track macronutrients and calories has done wonders for me. Lastly, consider supplementing with creatine. It's a very cheap supplement (4 month supply for $16 on amazon), and has been proven to provide more energy during workouts (resulting in more productive workouts) with practically no side effects, other than the need for increased water consumption during the first week of loading.

u/xxxm310ion · 2 pointsr/bugout

So I want to think you’re going for “grey man” due to your backpack, but carrying around an AK might make you stand out a bit. You could try storing your rifle in one of those bags that come with folding chairs. It would help a little at least.

You have a lot of heavy stuff like people have already said. That backpack won’t hold up to much weight over distance. You shouldn’t ever cheap out on the one thing that holds all of your gear. I understand backpacks can get quite expensive, but it really is a must.

You should pack more cordage. That can be used for a million things.

Get you a smaller bottle of water and a water filter. (Sawyer Mini )

I’m sure everyone is talking about weight, so I won’t say much about that other than cans, pots, and pans are heavy.

I’d like to see what changes you make, so feel free to post again once you have updated it a bit! Good luck! Welcome to the club!

u/fsacb3 · 3 pointsr/climbing

There are many variations, but you need to hang on something. Figure out a way, depending on what your living arrangements are. You can attach a pull up bar to a doorframe. You can hang from the door frame itself. You can find a tree or monkey bars or ledge of some kind outside.

Once you've found something to hang on, it'd be best to attach something to it. Hangboards, rock rings, pull up bar, homemade contraption. The device is not important, but preferably you can grip it in different ways. Open hand, sloper, two finger, crimp, side pull, etc.

Step three is to do pull ups, hangs, lock offs, and levers. Google hangboard workout and you'll find something. Use a chair if you need to reduce your weight, wear a backpack to increase it. Work out 3 times a week or so.

All the other fitness stuff you can do is great, but won't help your climbing as much as this. You have to hang, and you have to pull. This will keep in you decent shape.

Some links:

http://www.rockclimbing.com/Articles/Training_and_Technique/The_Making_of_a_Rockprodigy__258.html

http://www.amazon.com/Iron-Total-Upper-Body-Workout/dp/B001EJMS6K
The above can be modified to make it more climber friendly. You can make your own one of these: http://www.blankslateclimbing.com/shop/item/blank-slate/
Or you could hang some rock rings.

u/SilverSeven · 2 pointsr/ottawa

Just an FYI, I spend a LOT of time in the woods and put a lot of research into which leatherman to buy. Im so very happy I let a guy at Le Baron talk me into buying the Victorinox SwissTool RS. Its locking mechanism is way better IMO, the selection of tools is a little better, its got a much higher quality feel...all around just a way better product.

Does he spend time in the backcountry? Id highly recommend a Sawyer Mini. Pretty much the best filter you can buy. Can throw it right in line on a camel pack too. Super cool.

u/M_Mitchell · 3 pointsr/Firearms

Everyone can recommend you a bunch of items. How much are you wanting to spend?

He probably has hearing protection but if he just has buds, get some howard leight pros for $30. Also there are some generic bore snakes on amazon.

Howard Leights

.45 Pistol Boresnake

Shotgun Boresnake

and Midway has a really nice bag for a good price. They make different variations too if you want to look around.

That's all about $100 but it's a nice bag, ear protection, and some useful cleaning stuff but he'll still need patches and a cleaning kit. The shotgun would honestly be fine with just the bore snake especially if it's a pump at least for the time being unless he shoots a lot. Get something more pistol specific to keep that running nicely.

u/chrono13 · 2 pointsr/Survival

Sawyer mini for $19: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

Anyone looking at Lifestraw should look at the Sawyer as a (better) alternative.

Lifestraw:

264 gallons total filtration per straw.
Shelf Life: 5 years when stored at room temperature (package may say 3 years).
.2 micron filtration

Sawyer filter:

100,000 gallons (actually more, but this is the guarantee)
Shelf life: no limit on shelf life. Only temperature constraint is it should not be allowed to freeze.
.1 micron filtration

Lifestraw is $20. Sawyer is $20. I own the Sawyer and the flow through it is easy. It comes with a squeeze bag, but also attaches to regular bottles. Fill an empty Pepsi/Coke/Water bottle with nasty water, screw on the Sawyer and you are good to go. It works with Platypus bags, and as an inline or end filter for any hydration bladder.

If there is something special about the Lifestraw that I am missing, please let me know. I see tons of news, charaties buying them for 3rd world countries, and outdoor enthusiast recommending it. I do not see any advantage it has over a Sawyer filter.

Edit: One comparison: http://prepforshtf.com/sawyer-mini-water-filter-vs-lifestraw/

For me, the multiple ways of using the Sawyer have been the biggest benefit. I've used my Squeeze in a bucket gravity system, attached to bottles (ultralight backpacking) and with a straw (like a Lifestraw). I will often squeeze enough water to fill a Gatorade bottle or two before moving away from the water source. Now I have the mini and the flow rate is even better - best of any filter I've ever used, and it is still incredibly versatile. I have bought one for every person in my camping / hiking group to replace their filters. They use and love them too.

u/CopyrightedThought · 1 pointr/Watches

So do you want a diver or a business casual dress watch? The two watches you posted are VERY different in terms of where they work. Regardless, I would shy away from the Invicta. Here
is a higher quality diver, the Orient Mako, that is virtually the same. Same dimensions and everything.

It's hard to tell by your post but it seems you want this for the purpose of being able to dress it up more than dress it down. If you are willing to save another hundred dollars I think you could do well with the Hamilton Khaki Field. Can be either dressed up or down quite easily and goes well on a NATO.

Otherwise, dress watches like a Rodina or Orient Bambino might be more up your alley. Good luck!

u/averagetoabs · 1 pointr/Fitness

So, you have a couple of options here. I presume you don't want to have to buy gym equipment, but just know that if you buy used you can get a squat rack, barbell and some weights for a couple hundred buck. If you do that, you'll have a much easier time. Learn the squat, deadlift and overhead press, and that will provide an amazing foundation for you.

If you really can't do that, then at least invest a chinup bar. Something like this It's like 20 bucks. If you have that, you can start with a basic program of pushups, chinups, and bodyweight squats. For chinups and squats, try to build up to 3 sets of 30 with a minute rest in between.

Once that gets too easy, try making the exercise more difficult. Put your feet up on the coach for pushups. Work up to a one armed pushup. For bodyweight squats, try doing a bulgarian split squat

As for chinups, depends on your body weight, but i'd say once you can do 3 sets of 12 with a minute rest in between, you're probably in pretty good shape.

Do those 3 exercises 3 times a week.

u/txking12 · 2 pointsr/NoFap

I realized I needed more discipline in the gym, so I found this suggestion from someone over in /r/fitness: Jim Stoppani's 6 Week Shortcut to Shred. I've basically been doing that for the past month minus the cardio in between sets because I'm already skinny. I have also started working out with a buddy so that we can hold each other accountable. If you are struggling to gain weight check out /r/gainit. I honestly don't pay super close attention to what I eat, I just try my best to eat healthy, and lots of it. I do suggest getting some protein powder, I'd say that's probably the most important thing to supplement. I use the chocolate Gold Standard by Optimum Nutrition. I also throw in some peanut butter because its a really cheap source of calories, and sometimes a banana. I try to have at least two shakes a day; one right when waking, and one after my workout. I also bought this and highly recommend it. Seriously, whenever I felt the urge I would do pull ups/push ups.

I know how hard it can be to gain weight. I graduated high school at around 120lbs. I've gained since then and my normal weight was low 140s naturally. I still lose a few pounds if I don't eat properly for a day or two which is really frustrating. That routine is pretty strenuous. If you want something that requires less time check out starting strength in /r/fitness. It's basically squats, deadlifts, and bench press. I also started working out legs, which I never did before, and I think that has helped me a lot. All in all I spend probably an hour in the gym 5 days a week.. So I'm there frequently, and luckily I'm at a point in my life where I'm able to take an hour out of each day to do this. Let me know if there is any other way I can help or elaborate on. Feel free to pm me if need be.

u/papermageling · 2 pointsr/BuyItForLife

So, it's not hard for a knife to be BIFL. In fact, I have some $10 knives that probably are. What you pay for with a knife is edge quality, geometry, balance, and handle. In a lot of ways, having something to sharpen said knives with is the most important thing, as otherwise your knives will inevitably end up just as dull as your grandmother's.

How much time and effort are you interested in putting into your knives? There are a variety of options. Purists tend to prefer a sharpening stone, as it offers the greatest control. If you want to nerd about your knives, this allows you to control the edge angle and exactly how much material you remove from the knife. It's also the hardest though, and the one you're most likely to slack off from. The Lansky System offers nearly as much control and greater ease of use, and many people like this option.

If you know that both of those options are realistically not going to happen, get a pull through. It'll take a bit more metal from the edge when you sharpen it, but it's worth it if it's what you'll use. I got my parents one, actually. If you get a Western knife, you can pretty much get any pull through. If you get at least one Asian knife, get this pull through so that you can control the angle, as Asian knives are generally sharpened to a more acute angle.

As for knives? You can get really nice ones like Tojiro and Shun, you can get well reviewed ones like Victorinox, and as long as you don't get the super cheapo micro serrated knives, you'll probably be fine. I've got some Tramontina knives from Costco that are quite reasonable, and some Kom Kom knives which I adore and which are stupid cheap. Don't stick wood handled knives in the dishwasher (in general, the dishwasher dulls knives, but it also really is not kind to wood handles), and full tang knives are much better when you're talking wood handles, because they add extra stability.

Don't bother spending a ton of money on bread knives: they're incredibly difficult to sharpen, so it's really not worth it.

u/narwhalpiguy · 4 pointsr/gshock

If you want any watch with both a compass and temperature readings, it sounds like you'd be better off with a Casio Pro-Trek. They have more sensors than G-shocks, and are normally cheaper.

Here's one that costs only 50$ and has a compass, altimeter, thermometer, and barometer. That being said, it's not solar powered, and it has a negative display, which some people dislike (negative displays are slightly harder to read than positive ones).

If you want to go cheaper or really want a positive display, here's a 40$ one, but it does not have a compass or tough solar.

If you have your heart set on a g-shock. The only one with a compass and thermometer is this one, which, at 180$, does break the bank.

If you don't really care about a compass or thermometer that much and really want a g-shock, I can personally vouch for this at 40$, it's a steal. Other commonly recommended G-shocks are this one because it's less bulky and this one because not only is it less bulky, but it's one of the cheapest G-shocks with multiband-6 (for automatically syncing itself to the correct time) and tough solar.



My overall recommendation to you would be the 50$ Pro-Trek, as I think it fits your needs the best for cheap. However if you are against negative displays, it might not be for you.

Edit: Also the watch you chose is pretty cool. I just saw it was only 62$ on Amazon, that's a great option as well.

u/no1likesthetunahere · 1 pointr/motocamping

Yea, "craps table" :P


You guys sound rad! Keep it up. Just a few suggestions in case you haven't thought of them:

  • microfiber towel (cheap on Amazon, dry super fast)
  • headlamp (because you somehow always ending up arriving late and setting up a tent needs 2 hands)
  • Morrivoe Outdoor Folding Chair Portable Mesh Chair with Aluminum Alloy Support,Suitable for Camping Picnic Fishing Hiking + Free Carry Bag (Green) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B01M8IBYVC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_DI6RybVGZ2D8Z
    Packs up very small, lightweight, super comfy. Because your butt needs a good lounge after a full day of riding. A rock/stump/picnic table doesn't cut it
  • Klymit 06SVGR01C Static V Camping Mattress (Green-Grey, Large) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_VM6RybFHWN4Z1
    There is no better mattress for bike camping. It packs down the smallest and lightest. While being 100% comfortable.
  • zip ties, paracord and duct tape wrapped around an old credit card. Because you can fix absolutely anything with this trifecta


    Hope that helps!
u/e39lemansm5 · 3 pointsr/Watches

I'd recommend one of Orient's divers:

Ray

Mako


There are several color options and they are great for the money. In house movements, decent bracelets and in my opinion, great looking. I have the ray raven and love it.

If you want to spend a little more, the Bernhardt Binnacle Diver is another great option. I also own one of these and I can tell you the biggest difference compared to the Orients is in the bracelet. It has to be one of the best ones on the market in that price range.

u/OrangeJuliusPage · 2 pointsr/fatpeoplestories

> I could never have done a pull up without the assistance machine. I'm still fairly heavy, and female, and have never had much upper body strength. Still don't, actually.

Yeah, not to sound like a misogynist, you have way less testosterone coursing through your veins than even a male whussbag, so you get a bit of a free pass for being untrained and formerly sedentary and not being able to do a pullup. For dudes, that is still pretty awful, though.

> I don't have anyone to watch or a good mirror, but I do what I can when I can.

I hear ya. YouTube has a lot of really good form videos, though. For most of us "close enough" is fine.

> I'm purchasing some weights as soon as I get paid again so that I can do some curls and such, probably just a few 5-10 lb to start and I'll buy heavier when I'm ready. I know a few exercises with smaller weights, not much else.

That is really a pretty useless workout plan. You'd be better off saving that money and rolling it into a gym membership, instead. You won't get any kind of decent results with weight like that, and instead of wasting your time on that and doing infinite pointless curls, just take a few old gallons of milk and fill them with sand or dirt or something, and voila, you functionally have those small weights that you can use for shoulder presses and whatnot.

> I've looked at bodyweight stuff, but a lot of it seems really difficult considering my weight and weak arms.

Just work up to it. Pushups are free, all you need are a couple chairs to do dips, and for like $25, you can get a great pullup bar off Amazon.


> Gotta start somewhere, but where. I wish I had regular access to more equipment!

Do you live nowhere near a cheap gym or YMCA or something? If you are a university student, or merely a broke-ass mofo, their rates can be surprisingly reasonable.

u/test18258 · 1 pointr/knives

Its sad how many "professionals" out there are just morons with a belt sander.

Assuming that your trying to only spend whats on that gift card you looking at the lansky clamp system or one of the chinese edge pro knockoff sharpeners.

the lansky is a decent sharpener but can be a little bit fiddly to work with. however its capable of leaving a mirror polished perfectly flat edge once you know how to use it properly.

Lansky

The edge pro clones are going to be various levels of quality as they are chinese clones of an actual quality product. And if you do decide to get an edge pro knock off please get real edge pro stones or aftermarket stones made fro the edge pro the ones that come with the chinese clones tend to be garbage.

fake edge pro

I know you probably want to spend the money on the amazon gift card but you can also find knife sharpeners for relatively cheap on things like craigslist or here on /r/Knife_Swap

If your willing to spend more than the $50 on the giftcard there are a few more sharpeners that become available such as the spyderco sharpmaker, a real edge pro (cheaper varients apex 1,2 or 3 dont buy the version thats $700) a KME, wicked sharp, and a few others.

If you do decide to get the edge pro I would highly suggest getting the real thing if you can afford it. The edge pro stock stones are perfectly servicable but many of the aftermarket stones for it are way better.

Though if you are on a budget for this you could also get the chinese fake and get some either stock or aftermarket edge pro stones.

The only systems I have personal experience with are the edge pro and the spyderco sharpmaker though the rest of the ones I mentioned come highly recommended often.

u/Tree-eeeze · 1 pointr/Fitness

Nah, avoid that. Pulley-type systems are not the way to go. And for that cost you can pretty easily find a used powerrack plus weights or even potentially buy new.

A basic powerrack with bench will suit you much better. Something like this.

You really only need a powerrack + adjustable bench + Olympic weight set. There are bound to be a bunch of benches / weight sets on craigslist. I might buy the power rack new but if you see a good used one I'd look into it.

An enterprising individual could aquire all those things for $400 or less. All depends on what you're willing to buy used vs. new. I definitely wouldn't waste $600 on that one in your link - if anything it's limiting the amount of stuff you can do. A plain power rack is extremely versatile and a vital component of a strength training program.

u/DrippyWaffler · 8 pointsr/infp

Haha bro you're good. They probably scoff at your eating healthy efforts because you're in fine shape. I've put on a little chub to deal with the cold (I'm a tshirt+shorts all year round kinda guy) and when I mention working it off again people laugh at me and say I need to get bigger. Obviously they mean muscle rather than fat, but that's beside the point.

In terms of your face, I'm a straight dude so I can really give no actual help but you look fine to me. Girls seem to dig the John Snow look.

When you're talking to girls about yourself don't use words like "transitional period." Ask them questions about stuff, and if they ask you questions keep it to the point and as cheerful as possible.

In fact that's the one bit of "brutal honesty" I can give. Put a smile on that face.

I don't know how old you are, but you look about my age. I'll chuck a picture of me up when I can wrangle one to show you what I mean.

Sorry for the poor quality, I have an Ace 2 :(

I dive in 14 degree Celsius water, so I need the insulation. Under a shirt it's barely noticeable. In summer I get into shape more but for the mean while I like it where it is. Get one of these and you're sorted. This will do far more good than eating habits. (They help too though)

Me with similar expression and pose as the one in your photo. Phone isn't in the right place but who cares.

Look how much a smile and body language does!

So, in summary.

  1. Don't talk about healthy eathing and transitioning and whatnot. Ask her some questions, answer her questions to you. I know it's easy for us INFPs to off on tangents, so try and stick to the point.

  2. If you're really worried about your body shape, bulk up rather than slim down. EDIT - just realised I'm an idiot and this is what you meant in the first place. The following advice works regardless. 30 bucks 28 bucks for that bar. Pick a doorway, and do whatever - pull ups, chin ups - to exhaustion (until you can't do any more) every time you go through it.

  3. Smile + shoulders back + good posture. You'll They'll see the difference.
u/Jacob_The_Duck · 1 pointr/bicycling

Hey nice bike! If I were you I would add a saddle bag with some tubes, tire levers, and maybe get a small pump, and since you're just commuting the whole "it ain't aero" thing doesn't really fucking matter in my opinion ;) I would recommend this and these and this. Also read up on sites like Sheldon Brown for basics, and also I would recommend the GCN youtube channel for repair and maintenance. Also as far as locks go get a U-lock like this for most security and use this locking method. Have fun and stay safe, and feel free to ask any questions to me or any of the other people on this sub!

u/cy19 · 2 pointsr/P90X

I think I'm understanding the question and I'm in the same boat. I workout in my unfinished basement and have no access to doors there. So what I did was get 2 of these hooks (you can get nicer colors than red if you want).

I got a pull-up bar that looks like this but was under $20 at Walmart. I put the hooks so they hook under the horizontal bar that you don't use to pull-up on (the part that's supposed to go behind your doorframe), on the inside as far apart as they go. Then you can easily take the bar down when you're not using it. It works great but I'm not sure if it will be cosmetically pleasing to you, having 2 hooks there when you're not using it, it's not an issue in my basement for me.

I hope that helps, if it sounds even remotely like what you're looking for I can take a picture when I get home if my explanation fell short.

u/edheler · 2 pointsr/preppers

Don't let fear of the future define you. You will have a much happier life if you just don't worry about what might happen. Plan for the worst but expect the best. Then planning for things that might happen is just a fun hobby and thought exercise.

Try to find a Sawyer Mini for water filtering. They are probably about €20 since they are $20 here in the US. It's easily the best option for water filtering at the moment.

At your age I would try to find a way to get into backpacking and camping. It will give you a good reason to have the kind of equipment you want to get without anyone thinking it was anything strange. It will just be a normal everyday kind of hobby that other people do. Just don't tell them about your other reasons for doing it.

u/MarcusDohrelius · 3 pointsr/guns

Palmetto has free shipping right now. This means they may have raised some prices on certain things so check the price histories over the last few months if possible. The absolute cheapest way is to build yourself. As in buying all of the parts, not just a complete upper and complete lower. Sometimes this can be pretty negligible, though. The way to ultimately build it cheaper by buying piece by piece would be to do it over time, where you opportunistically look for the best deals. I tried to piece together one for you below. It is cheaper than a ptac and blackhawk! build from palmetto, but not by more than 30-50$. But you have more options, can spread out the cost, and you will know the system and how it works much better.

Lower 60$

lower parts kit 35$

Buffer tube/ stock assembly 27$. check around for Sportsmansguide coupons

Blem upper 41$ plus 10$ flat rate shipping. You could combine your magazine purchases from Cope's with the shipping on the upper.
like this 8$ GI mag or this deal for 10 pmags for 107$.

Bolt Carrier Group 80$

Gas Block 17$

Gas tube 13$

forward assist 16$. You may could find this for a few dollars cheaper elsewhere.

Ejection port assembly 9$

free float quadrail 22$ or regular m4 handguards 19$ but you would need this [9$ delta ring]. or the Magpul MOE handguard for 28$

(http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/dpms-ar-15-m16-delta-pack.aspx?a=369258) to go with it.

Bear Creek Barrel, 16" 70$ plus shipping.

Reliable red dot, TRS 25 for 80$ shipped.

and/or iron sights A2 front 18$

Rear sight 22$

So after FFL transfer on the lower (10-30$ depending on location) and shipping on everything you are looking at between 460$ with iron sights, quad rail, and a mag or around 550$ with a red dot and multiple mags.

Cheapest ammo. and at Sportsmansguide where you could ship it with some of the other stuff and potentially use some of their coupons.

you might want to pick one of these wrenches up at 18$ to do the installs.

I know you might only be beating Palmetto prices by around 50-100$, but if you really are on a budget that could make a difference. These prices aren't the very lowest I've ever seen, but they are some of the best I could find in about 5-10min of looking around. Plus, you get the added benefit of buying your rifle in parts, which could help with your budget limitations, and also, more importantly, you can be really familiar with your firearm and its components.

u/Ropeless · 1 pointr/orangecounty

What kind of knife?

I agree with the comments about learning to do it yourself, but freehand sharpening is a skill that takes time to learn, and you'll want to do on cheaper knives at first.

I usually recommend a lansky constant angle sharpener for most people. It's easy to use, and will give you a perfect edge, much better than most people get freehand.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000B8IEA4?pc_redir=1404306988&robot_redir=1

If you still need it sharpened in a week or so,
Send me a PM, I'm in Brea, and could sharpen it for you if you like. (Knife making is my hobby)

u/screwyoushadowban · 1 pointr/Fitness

Hey! I know this is old now, but:

As others have said, it depends on your goals. But it also depends on your mindset and habits.

Minus a two year period in college where I went to the university gym I've always had a home gym and I love it. I don't have to worry about "getting motivated" to jump in the car and go to the gym. It's right there! And what if it's the middle of the day and I feel like doing power cleans for no reason? Hey, my barbell and bumper plates are in the next room.

But that's what works for my mentality. Other people think, "Well, the weights are right there, I can go any time, I might as well lift tomorrow". Then there are also people who can't stand working out alone for whatever reason. If you're one of these people a home gym is probably a terrible idea for you, and a gym membership would be better.

Oh, and I recommend scrounging up some cash or getting a part time job and buying a power rack (like this one, try to get it on sale. It's a decent but very basic rack. I don't know if it's available outside the U.S.). A power rack is more versatile, you'll outgrow just a bench press very quickly (I sure did when I was a teen and got one) and a power rack is much safer (especially if you bench at home without a training partner).

Have you checked out /r/homegym?

u/talahrama · 1 pointr/90daysgoal

It's SO helpful to have a community here that I can talk to about running or general fitness stuff. I go on and on so much to my family and friends that I need to actually consciously rein it in so I don't seem like a nut or self-absorbed. I'm very grateful. And I'm looking forward to hearing tomorrow how you kicked pull-up ass!

I started doing leg lifts! Abdomen hurts, B- experience. For pull-up bars (I saw you mentioned on the BW thread), as long as you have a door jamb, you can get something like this, which is what I have. Super convenient, sturdy, easily tossed in a closet when you're done using it.

Good luck with those cookies. I believe in you. If you need help, you can just send 'em to me and I'll take care of them for you.

u/ashirian · 3 pointsr/Watches

I think you could find good citizen Eco Drive that has similar function as PRC200 : http://www.amazon.com/Citizen-AT0200-05E-Eco-Drive-Chronograph-Canvas/dp/B000EQR6H0/ref=sr_1_6?s=watches&ie=UTF8&qid=1335766853&sr=1-6

Or a Seiko Kinetic
http://www.amazon.com/Seiko-SSB045-Special-Value-Kinetic/dp/B00756FJJ4/ref=sr_1_5?s=watches&ie=UTF8&qid=1335767001&sr=1-5

Another option for quartz since you were looking at PRC200, is Orient TT0Z001B Limited Edition STI Ion Plated chronograph.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=TeMpz-cxl8A

The Orient used to give out 50% off coupon but they don't do that anymore just 30%.. so $440 retail, 50% would have been $220.
http://orientwatchusa.com/tt0z001b

For what you get, I think it's good deal at $170. 5 left until sold out. 4 left.
http://www.discountwatchstore.com/Orient-TT0Z001B-Mens-Limited-Edition-STI-Black-Ion-Plated-Chronograph_p_27651.html
_____
If you want an automatic mechanical watch, I would suggest Orient Mako, Seiko 5 series, or Sea-Gull watch.

http://www.amazon.com/Orient-Mens-CEM65002D-Automatic-Watch/dp/B001EWEQ3K/ref=sr_1_1?s=watches&ie=UTF8&qid=1335767894&sr=1-1

http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-MENS-ORIENT-ORIGINAL-DIVER-AUTOMATIC-STANLEY-STEEL-WITH-BOX-GIFT-/350497575972?pt=Wristwatches&var=&hash=item519b489424#ht_1402wt_901

http://www.ebay.com/itm/350497575972?var=620037004130&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649#ht_1402wt_901

http://www.amazon.com/Seiko-Sports-Automatic-Watch-SNZG13/dp/B006BUE84M/ref=sr_1_31?s=watches&ie=UTF8&qid=1335767513&sr=1-31

I have that Seiko SNZG13 and it's great on my wrist. I think for smaller wrist, you should look at 38mm~42mm. I have a 43mm watch and the lugs hover over my wrist. I have two 41mm watches that I wear most frequently and those are Orient and Seiko SNZG13.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Sea-Gull-M186S-automatic-designer-watch-multi-purpose-comfortable-to-wear-/280841797985?pt=Wristwatches&var=&hash=item416379c161#ht_642wt_1141

I'm getting this Sea-Gull next. For the price this is a beautiful piece with classic roman numeral dial with blue hands. I have a cheap Parnis with ST-25 but the movement is just dead accurate. More so accurate than my Orient and Seiko 7s26. I'd say accuracy is Sea-Gull>Orient>7s26 in this order with Seiko being most elusive sometimes. Plus with Sea-Gull automatic, you get the movement that you can hand wind as well as hack. So all in all the Sea-Gull may be your best bet at EXACTLY $120. You'll get a penny back.

Hope it helped.

u/Peoples_Bropublic · 1 pointr/knives

A fixed blade would be perfect. Mora knives are excellent inexpensive knives that are quite commonly used for camping. They make some with wooden handles, composite handles, stainless blades, and carbon blades. My understanding is that their stainless blades don't hold an edge quite as well as their carbon blades, but carbon blades have the disadvantage of being susceptible to rust. So for an outdoor camping application where you're likely to be running around in dirt and mud and rain and lakes and streams and not likely to have a supply of rubbing alcohol, clean cloths, metal polish, and mineral oil, a stainless blade with composite handle would probably serve you best.

On the other hand, Cody London, that hippy dude from Dual Survival pretty much exclusively uses classic Moras with wooden handles and carbon blades. On the other other hand, he also doesn't wear pants or shoes.

Here are a few to look at.

u/hakugene · 1 pointr/Watches

If you are fine with branching out to digital, there are some really cool options for less than 50 bucks. Cheap casio digitals are quite popular, and can cost as little as 10 dollars.

You can also get an entry G-Shock for about that much. It doesn't have solar or radio-controlled time but it is definitely a great watch. Perfect if you want something for swimming, work out, etc., and also just pretty cool in their own right.

G Shock DW5600

u/David_Boom · 3 pointsr/CanadianForces

Hey! not in the CAF but a huge watch nerd.

The Casio GD350-1B is a pretty good choice. It's a G-shock and has pretty much every feature you need (Countdown, timezone, calendar, stopwatch). The unique thing about this model is that it has a silent vibration alarm and a negative display.

The Casio F-91W It does lake some features but its probably one of the most well-known, cheap, and reliable Casio watch out there. It's really light, pretty much not noticeable, and is almost impossible to break.

The Casio G-Shock DW5600E-1V is a really cheap but it still packs bunch of features and it is durable. I guess this is the middle between the GD 350 and the F-91.

There are bunch of really good and durable watches out there, these are just some of my personal favourites. They are not only reliable, durable, and good watches, they look really nice too.

u/LilFuniAZNBoi · 6 pointsr/CCW

What's your budget?

You can ever go wrong with ammo. A package of some good defense ammo like Federal HST or Speer Gold Dots makes a good stocking stuffer.

Since he'll need to go to the range for practice (I sure hope so), get a good pair of ear protection like the Howard Leights.


A cheap range bag to carry ammo, gun, and ear/eye protection is a good gift too. Walmart has them for cheap.


Upgrades like night sights from Trijicon would be good on a carry gun. A good holsters and a proper gun belt are essentials as well.

u/AvgasActual · 1 pointr/guns

I use "3M Peltor X-Series Over-the-Head Earmuffs". They work great, they're comfy, and $30.

  • When I shoot outdoors, I use the X4A (Chartreuse, 27dB).
  • When I shoot indoors, I use the X5 (Black, 31dB) or X4A with 3M Classic Earplugs, medium size.
  • When I'm working on turbine engines, I use the foamy ear plugs and/or MSA HPE Cap Mounted Earmuff. (In case you want a hard hat mounted option.)

    ​

    I've tried a bunch of different earpro options. The most important thing is that the muffs seal around your ears... as best they can while wearing safety glasses. I always wear a baseball cap and Smith & Wessson Magnum 3G safety glasses. (Hot .22 brass inside your glasses really sucks.) For ear plugs, most people like the long skinny kind that you roll and stuff into your ear canal. They really bother me, so the only ones I like are the 3M classics. I even had some custom ear plugs made and they did not work at all. (And it's only a matter of time before you lose them.) Also make sure to clean reusable plugs between uses.

    ​

    I'm not a fan of electronic ear muffs, especially Howard Leight Low Profile. The speakers inside the muffs stand on my ears and they don't seal for crap. One of my buddies was using these and had a terrible flinch. I gave him the X4's his flinch was gone. I haven't tried any of the mid-range electronic ear muffs. The high end MSA Sordins are very nice and pretty effective, but I haven't got around to picking some up yet. The only time you really want electronic muffs is when you're doing a shooting class, and you need to listen to the instructor. (Or for hunting, I suppose.) For general BS'ing during shooting or listening to the Range Safety Officer, I can hear just fine.

    ​

    Another point about PPE (Personal Protective Equipment), don't take it off! Leave your ear plugs in and your glasses on so you don't lose or damage them. Ear muffs are easy to take off during cease fires.
u/slip81 · 1 pointr/Watches

Citizen, Seiko, and Orient would probably be your best best in that price range, here are some examples you might like, all on the smaller side
orient
seiko
here
here
here
Citizen
here
here
here

the biggest one is 43mm, which would probably look fine, I wear a 42mm and have small writs as well and it looks good. good luck

u/MrClahn · 3 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

Whilst i spent a fair amount on my pack, sleeping bag and pad, and tent the rest i cheaped out on. Echoing what others have said but most clothing you can get cheap (any poly/.running t shirts and base layers, sleeping socks, gloves, hat, swimming trunks), trash bag for pack liner, cat can alcohol stove (or stoveless, if you prefer canister then there's always this for cheap and light http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U ) , uniqlo UL down jacket (you can get them on ebay for at least half price to), frogg toggs for waterproofs. Darn tough socks might be expensive at first but the warranty would probably make them worth it in the case of a thru hike. Cascade Mountain Tech Carbon Fiber poles if you want to use hiking poles for $30. Depending on your budge the Six Moon Designs Scout tent is lightweight (34 oz) and only $125. CCF pads are much cheaper and fine for some, but i'd try and test one out first if you can.

Second hand gear is always a good way to go, i stalked eBay a fair bit getting gear together. As far as shoes go, trail runners are very popular but do tend to have shorter lives so i'd recommend approach shoes (such as Merrell Moab Vents) which tend to last a bit longer. The biggest way to save money though is to just not buy gear, which will also help keep your weight down. If you just embrace the fact you're going to stink and be dirty from the start then you don't need that second t shirt and trousers/trunks, less pairs of socks and underwear etc.

u/kevmo77 · 2 pointsr/P90X

Price of ultimate plan: $370

P90X base plan: $140


Pull Up Bar: $30


Push Up Bars: $10


Chin Up Assist $35. This is a handy tool but a chair will suffice.


The recovery drink, while not a total waste of money, can be replaced with much cheaper supplements. I do stuff like protein powder and a frozen banana in a blender. Equivalent cost $40.


The real issue with ultimate package is the bands. You're going to want real weights. I went to a second hand sports equipment store and got a set of free weights at $.50 a pound. A nice full set will be in the $150 range.


Total: Around $400.


So for around $30 more, you can buy a much better set up than what's offered in the ultimate package. If you stick with it, you're going to replace the bands anyway.

u/hurricanefalcon · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

You won't find a good skeleton watch in that price range. If you do find one it may look nice, but more than likely it'll be very cheaply made and won't be built to last. For around 150 you have a ton of options. I'd recommend the

Seikon SKX007

or various Seiko 5's 1 2



Orient Mako, it comes in a variety of colors

Deep Blue makes a nice dive watch, this is the quartz version, the mechanical version is a little more expensive.

You can also look into homage watches like Alpha but these are lesser quality than the ones listed above. I'd stay away from brands like Invicta, Stuhrling, and even something like Skagen. If you're going to shell out $150 might as well get your money's worth.

u/JamSandwich948 · 1 pointr/airsoft

Sorry for the long wait but here it is

Right strap yourself in this is probably going to be long one. It will help if you have some electronics knowledge and soldering skills. But don't worry if you don't, most of this it very basic, but a bit fiddly.

Also to note this is going to be based around the Kenwood style connector, this is what you find on most BeoFeng radios. If your radio uses a different type then you'll have to do some reverse engineering to find the pin out of that, you may find getting a speaker mic that useful for this, as they normal have a PCB inside thats labelled.

​

Parts list:

- Howard Light Impact Sports

- Antlion modmic 4 without mute

- 3.5mm audio Aux cable (length dependent on your setup, also get one with rubber insulation rather than a braided sleeve,it will only give you more problems later on)

- Wire strain reliefs (the correct size for your Aux cable & Kenwood Cable, I belive that I use 4mm)

- Zip ties

- Belt spring clip + screws and nuts to mount (Just M3 pan head screws & nuts will do, the included poppers are crap)

- Momentary on button

- Small electronics box

- Speaker mic or anything that has a compatible connector for your radio (I used a BaoFeng speaker mic as the kenwood connector is used on my rectervis radios).

- Breadboard

- wire

​

This will come to about £100 so it's defiantly cheaper to go with a reproduction unit, but I had a lot of these parts already and its a fun project.

First take a set of Howard Lights and pop off the black plastic piece that holds the foam padding over the driver on the side that has the 3.5mm aux socket.

Next cut a notch in the main body for the mic to sit in and and not block the black plastic piece. cut the wire on the mic down to size so that would reach the 3.5mm Aux socket but so you could still move it about to make soldering easier .

Then strip the insulation to expose the wires on the mic, these are excessive thin and have a coating on them that you will need to strip. I advise that you practice on the off cut so that you get a feel for it a few times as you don't want to find your mic wire being too short.

On the Aux socket you'll have 3 wires attached to that, ground(black), left audio & right audio(red & white, I never bothered to figure out which was which) . Desolder one of the audio wires and solder it on to the other. This means that any audio from the Aux socket will play through both ears but will only be a mono signal, which for this will be fine for us as the audio from the radio is mono anyway,and this won't affect the sound pass through of the headset.

​

**you're going to need a multi meter for this bit**

If you didn't know already audio jacks are normal spilt in to 3 or 4 sections these are called TRS & TRRS respectively, we should be dealing with the 3 sections kind, they are spilt up in to the Sleeve(S), Ring(R ) & Tip(T), inventive right.

A Kenwood connector is made up of 2 TRS jacks 1 3.5mm & 1 2.5mm. Fortunately I've done the hard work of figuring out how the pins are wired:

​

||2.5mm|3.5mm|
|:-|:-|:-|
|T|Speaker||
|R||Mic|
|S|Ground|Push To Talk|

You will need to check how you've wired your Aux port to know what wires need to go were, just plug in your Aux cable and do a continuity check for the tip and ring and the sleeve will be ground. For me I had the Mic wired to the Ring and the Speaker wired to the Tip.

Here is what my wiring layout looked like.

You want to strip down the insulation on the Kenwood cable and reveal the wires and find out what colour wires are which. You also want to measure out how long you need to leave your 3.5mm Aux wire and not cut it down to size leaving enough slack for your head to move and enough length of wire to solder and strip back the insulation and test to find out which wires are linked to which.

Now once you have figure out what colour wires are which you want to cut down a section of breadboard to the right size, if your a bit of a novice with a soldering iron, you will probably want to cut a larger section as it will make things easier for you. Then just solder all the wires on to the correct place, just to note it doesn't matter which way round the push button is soldered on. and you'll end up with something that looks a bit like this

Now you can just zip tie the ends of the wires inside of the box to stop them from popping out and move the point of stress to the insulation of the wire rather than on the solder joints.

I would suggest doing a continuity test from jack to jack to ensure that nothing is shorting (wrong point to point) and that everything is connected to were it should be.

We should be good now to plug it all together and give it a test, it should all be working, you should be receiving audio in both ears of the head set, and when the push button is depressed you should be transmitting from the microphone.

Once your happy with that and only when, cover all your solder joints with a bit of hot glue to again stop anything from bouncing around and causing a short on it, in particular on the Aux port on the head set and the breadboard. we also want to fix the microphone in place with some hot glue and make sure the hole is filled so no water can get in. I also added some foam to the headset just it increase the noise deadening effect.

all done, you should have something that looks a bit like this also I have seen a video on youtube that shows you how to add rail mounts to them so you can mount them on a helmet which I haven't tried yet but will be soon hopefully

Full Album Of Reference Photos

u/greatkio · 2 pointsr/Watches

You are going to have a really hard time finding a watch that matches that description in that price range. Nothing I'm gonna tell you in this post is anything that any other member of this sub wouldn't know by heart because there are so few things worth looking at in that range. At ~150 you're almost guaranteed not to find something with sapphire. You looking for analog or digital? There's this - it's not simple/clean, but comes from a decent brand.

In your price range, your best bet is to go with a G-Shock. They're well known for their durability, and there are about a bajillion options to choose from in terms of looks. They have some cool features (radio sync time) but don't necessarily match your aesthetic, as they're kind of busy.

The Citizen Eco-Drive is also highly regarded for its accuracy for the price. I can't speak to its durability though. It's got a mineral crystal. Looks like a pretty decent watch for your specifications.

As for the Timex Expedition...well...you get what you pay for. This is hard - your options would open up radically if you would double your price range you could pick up a Hamilton Khaki or something a little nicer by Victorinox. There's always the tried-and-true, nobody-on-this-sub-ever-shuts-up-about-it Seiko 5, which also has a billion options, and is cheap, but I don't know if they're military durable.

u/FastAktionJakson · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

Congrats on starting the journey that is bushcraft and woodsmanship. It's such a rewarding pastime. Since you seem to be loading up on gear I have on huge piece of advise for you. I beg you BEG YOU to invest a little bit of money on a good belt knife. Nothing to fancy. Some thing like an Old Hickory butcher knife or a good quality Mora . Both are relatively inexpensive and quality products. When I started out I bought a cheap "survival knife" which wasn't worth the cardboard packaging it came in and then eventually upgraded to the Bear Grylls ultimate survival knife which promptly broke after about 3 overnights of use. Budget bushcraft is fine for most things however spending 15 dollars on a mora you will have to replace MAYBE every 3 or 4 years if you take care of it certainly beats spending 10 dollars 3 or 4 times a year on junk. Good luck and remember... in the famous words of Ray Mears "If you're in the woods and you're 'roughing it' you're doing something wrong"

u/tiara733 · 3 pointsr/xxfitness

Definitely look into body weight exercises. There are a ton you can do at home without any equipment.

Some examples: pushups, planks (for core), dips (on a chair), inverted rows (on a table), body weight squats, lunges, etc.

One piece of equipment you may want to purchase is the Iron Gym pull up bar. It installs easily into most doorframes and won't damage anything. Pull ups are a great exercise for arms/back. Bear in mind that unassisted pull ups are quite hard if you don't have much upper body strength, but you can start out with hangs/negatives and work from there. You can also use the pull up bar for pushups, crunches, and dips too. I know I sound like one of those infomercials but this pull up bar is actually pretty useful. Hope this helps!

u/Frith_Inle · 2 pointsr/Watches

Hey, fellow snowboarder here. I used to ride a ton, but not as much anymore (work, school, friends, life). I've worn 2 G-shocks through 10 years of park riding. They never broke or succumbed to the elements in my experience.

I highly recommend the DW5600E-1V for its low profile and smaller build, as well as low cost. I wear a GWM5610-1 now (pretty much the same thing), which I wear on the inside of my wrist so if I fall on my hands (you're really not supposed to, but it happens, sue me) it doesn't dig into the back of my hand. It fits nicely under a big glove or jacket too.

You could get a Vostok for around the same price and it would probably be fine, but IMO G-shocks were designed for this sort of high impact activity. Definitely recommend.

u/Kilo353511 · 8 pointsr/bugout

Here is what would use for $100 USD. All prices are via Amazon/Wal-mart

Pack: OutLander Lightweight Day Pack - Cheap, Lightweight and would get the job done for a GHB ($18)

Cutting: Morakniv Companion - Cheap and Mora makes some of the best knives ($12)

Combustion: Storm Matches ($6), All-weather matches($0.75), 2 Bic Lighters($2), and some Wetfire($6)

Cover: 3 Emergency Blankets($2)

Container: Back pack listed above, 6 bottles of water ($3), Single layer stainless steel bottle($7)

Cordage: 100 Feet of 550 ($6), Duct tape ($3)

Candlelight: 2 LED Lights ($4-12)

Consumables: 6 Cliff bars ($6), 3 %-Hour Energy ($6), Bag of trail Mix ($6)

Clothing: 2 Extra Pair of socks ($2), 2 pair Gloves ($7), 2 Hats ($10)

Communication: 3 Road Flares ($6) Signaling Mirror ($3)

Cash: $40-100 is recommended but this is optional.




Everything I have there (Cash excluded) should cost around $120. You can save money by making your own Wetfire with cotton balls and petroleum jelly. And the food can probably be replaced with cheaper items. I just put stuff I am comfortable with. Same is true with the flashlights, you could grab 4 of the $1
Wal-mart lights they are great for short term use and would cut out another $8.

Buy stuff in bulk when it is available too this will cut down cost.

Something every car should already have, but it worth the extra $10-20 is a small first aid kit or 2.

u/tkari · 12 pointsr/UCDavis

I recommend getting a U-Lock along with an extension cable. You want to put the U-Lock somewhere through the rear triangle like this.
This locks the rear wheel and the frame. Then you want to loop the extension cable through the U-Lock and put it through your front tire so it is also secure. Kryptonite, Abus, and On Guard are all good lock brands. Something like this lock would work fine, but there are more expensive options if you want to be more secure. I personally use this lock. All locks are about buying time because an angle grinder can cut through any lock in a few minutes. I suggest parking it to something secure, something public, and well-lit. Also, make sure to register your bike through TAPS because if someone steals your bike or puts a lock on it, they won't be able to help you. Good luck!

u/MadCabbages · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Wow, fantastic answer. Thank you!

By cheapish I mean all gear for the trip for under about €500.

Re Gear: I couldn't find suppliers for the gear you suggested in Europe and shipping was very expensive from the US so what do you think of these.
Tent
Sleeping Bag
Sleeping Mat
Stove set
with something like this as a bear bag (with rope etc)?

Re Food: Yes there is alot of villeges/towns along the way. However I was looking at this and thought it might be a good idea.. I will look into water purification device as well.

I don't think my budget will extend to a GPS device this time around so a map/compass + smartphone it is!

Sorry for all the silly questions. Your answer the last time helped a lot!

u/theoutrider5485 · 2 pointsr/BuyItForLife

The man that sharpens my knives locally, explained to me that all dish washing detergents have abrasives in them to clean your dishes better. Abrasives are bed for a keen edge. Personally I have been using
Morakniv Companions as steak knives. I chose these knives because my buddy who is a survival instructor and search and rescue personnel swears by them for anything, outdoors or indoors. The blade lasts forever and the edge on the carbon steel lasts longer than stainless because carbon steel is harder. I bought three and they are pretty amazing. They are carbon steel, so they will acquire their own amazing colors as you use them.

EDIT: Find them here: http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1408767946&sr=1-1

u/LogicWavelength · 13 pointsr/airsoft

I am a moderator at /r/Watches. I wrote about six paragraphs and Alien Blue crashed. I will edit this post tomorrow Morning EST will dump more info than you will ever need.

Short answer: G-shock.

Long answer: Luminox Recon.

EDIT: OK, jeez! Sorry that I have a job to do besides moderate a sub and edit posts from the night before...

Basically, G-Shocks are the go-to choice for military and law enforcement. They are super rugged and are actually difficult to break on purpose. I wear a GR7900KG-3 (pictured elsewhere in the comments), that is a limited edition colorway of OD green and orange with an inverted screen. The non-limited edition of my watch, the GW7900B-1 has a laundry list of great features: it's solar-powered, has a perpetual calendar (automatically adjusts for different length months like February), tide graph, dual time, time-zome adjustment, 200m depth water resistence, uses one of G-Shocks better anti-shock systems, (edit: there are about 15 other features that I'm not listing) and the best feature of all... it uses radio synchonization to set the time for you, based off of the nearest atomic clocks located around the world.

There is also the much more affordable, original G-Shock. They make a "reissue" of it called the DW5600E-1V. It's not going to give you any of the fancy features, but it is tough as hell and will probably survive getting run over by a tank. It's also 1/3rd the cost of the 7900.

Obviously there are a million G-Shocks to choose from. These are just my personal suggestion and the most common, inexpensive suggestion. However, you said "nice watch." I wouldn't field a "nice watch" airsofting (I use my G-Shock), but if you wanted to, and wanted to have it be presentable the rest of the time it spends on your wrist, I suggest a Luminox Recon Point Man.

The most important difference here over other Luminox watches is the sapphire glass crystal. Unless they are shooting BBs made of jagged diamonds, it isn't going to harm your watch. A regular mineral crystal can shatter from the force of taking a round. Unless they shoot your watch directly from about 15 feet away, nothing is going to break a sapphire crystal. The Recon Point man just so happens to have a sapphire glass crystal.

It comes in the colors:

  • Red with a polyurathane strap
  • Green with a green NATO/hybrid strap
  • Blue with a gray NATO/hybrid strap
  • There are also version of each color with the walking tachymeter in kilometers instead of miles.

    I have a Luminox (pictured elsewhere in the comments) with their proprietary NATO/hybrid strap. It is not a normal NATO strap, and it is not a normal Zulu strap. It takes the best features of both of these designs and merges them into their own proprietary thing. It is hands down the best nylon watch strap I've ever seen.

    The most important feature of a Luminox watch is the tritium gas tube lume. There are tiny tubes marking the hands and hour positions that constantly glow because the tritium isotope contained inside the tubes is radioactive. Tritium is commonly used in firearms sights, and provides the best nighttime and low-light visibilty. It's awesome. Now, the Recon is a polycarbonate case, whereas my Black Ops (discontinued, now called the ANU) is 316L steel PVD coated black. Poly watches aren't bad, they are just different. It will feel light and... just not as strong. Then again, G-Shocks are the same way, so really you aren't losing out on anything. So I assure you that the PC-cased Recon is in fact tough as hell.

    It will also serve as a conversation piece. A common thing for a watch is to make a statement. The kid flipping burgers wears a G-Shock. Not to say this should matter, but it does when discussing an accent piece such as a watch. It's like saying there isn't a difference between real gear and airsoft brand gear - there is undeniably a caché that goes with the more expensive stuff.

    So, all in all, I recommend the Luminox Recon.
u/HoberShort · 4 pointsr/gundeals

Did you notice the part where they have microphones that amplify all the sounds that aren't gunshots? Howard Leight makes a set like that, but they're fifty bucks. The set you linked aren't really comparable.

That said, the $50 HL set are pretty good. I'd recommend some foam ear plugs and cranking the amplification all the way up. You can hear people talk and feel pretty safe about your hearing.

u/dweezil22 · 5 pointsr/homegym

At that weight basically anything you get will be ok, that said, safeties are still nice to have, so consider the value of a full rack or a half rack instead of just a squat stand. As always, Craigslist or your local alternative can be a lot better deals (and your realism about weights may mean that some of the less popular cheaper stuff will be great for you while everyone else is chasing expensive Rogue gear).

If you do want to go new, Slickdeals just pointed me towards this $250 prime shipping rack on Amazon that looks like one of the cheapest options at the moment: https://www.amazon.com/Fitness-Reality-810XLT-800lbs-Capacity/dp/B01N4I8FOY/ CamelCamelCamel is amazingly reporting it sold for < $150 a few times this year (though I dunno if that included shipping)

u/Karnadas · 1 pointr/loseit

http://www.amazon.com/Iron-Total-Upper-Body-Workout/dp/B001EJMS6K/ref=sr_1_1?s=exercise-and-fitness&ie=UTF8&qid=1312761810&sr=1-1

Someone posted pictures of it damaging parts of the doorframe. I've had no issues with mine, and I see almost nothing but positive reviews so idk. Maybe extra padding like a washcloth to be safe? Either way that looks to be one of the best and most portable on Amazon. Good luck!

u/NathCraft27 · 6 pointsr/pcmasterrace

Oh for sure! What's your price range?

For under 40$ some great options would be the Kershaw Leek , the Kershaw Cryo (the Cryo II is a bit larger for almost the same price if you prefer) or anything Kershaw really. You could also look for Sanrenmu knives, they're good for the price.

If you're really serious and you're looking for better quality, I recommend the Spyderco Delica (smaller), the Spyderco Endura (larger) or the Benchmade Griptilian (mini or full size, your choice). I own a mini Griptilian and I love it, I really recommend it if you can justify the price.

u/uberfastman · 1 pointr/knives

I'll second /u/super_octopus 's post! I've got the Sharpmaker and it works great for all my knives, from my Buck 505 with a 1.875" blade to my custom Bowie and Kukri both with over 6" blades. The system is pretty affordable (under $60).

Alternately I've heard really good things about the Lansky system, either the three stone or five stone sets, both of which are even more affordable (under $40).

I've also got a few diamond coated whetstones for freehand sharpening, which work great too, but you just have to be prepared to go slow at first and learn how to hold your blades at the proper angles and sharpen them evenly. DMT makes some good diamond coated whetstones.

So definitely watch a few youtube videos, read the sidebar guide /u/super_octopus pointed out to you, and if you're still unsure on technique, once you get something to sharpen your knives with, try to practice first with some old beater knife or cheap blade that you might not mind having to sharpen a little extra in case it takes you a while to get it right.

u/IAmAPhysicsGuy · 1 pointr/DIY

Sure! Here is what I originally started with. It works great once I have an edge, but setting the edge took a lot of time on really dull knives so I bought this extra coarse diamond hone. I love it, it sets my bevel in minutes so I can go back and finish the edge with the fine stones. For a few extra bucks, you can buy the whole diamond set. I would also recommend getting the mount so you can safely attach it to a workspace.

And finally, I learned how to use the system from Aaron Gough in his video here

u/eltonnovs · 2 pointsr/knives

You get used to friction folders, but I understand your concerns. If you want a locking knife if would forget about them. Making it a locking folder is a pretty extensive mod.

It's something totally different, but the Ontario Rat 2 is a pretty popular knife over here. It locks, has good steel and is pretty affordable. But it doesn't have the looks of a higonokami.