Reddit mentions: The best test, measure & inspect products

We found 4,660 Reddit comments discussing the best test, measure & inspect products. We ran sentiment analysis on each of these comments to determine how redditors feel about different products. We found 1,275 products and ranked them based on the amount of positive reactions they received. Here are the top 20.

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u/wanosy · 2 pointsr/reloading

Chamfer/deburr - the two you have listed fit on a case prep machine that I don't see listed. One like this, made by every manufacturer, is all that is needed https://www.midwayusa.com/product/465641/rcbs-chamfer-and-deburring-tool-17-to-60-caliber or https://www.midwayusa.com/product/171844/hornady-deluxe-4-blade-chamfer-and-deburring-tool

For a bench priming tool, this one https://www.midwayusa.com/product/457599/rcbs-automatic-bench-priming-tool is more highly reviewed, and the one I use now. First 15 yrs I primed on the RockChucker press. Or get a hand-primer as suggested. Got extra space on your bench, get it. Wanna watch TV and prime, get a hand tool. Up to you really.

And get the shorter handle for the press https://www.midwayusa.com/product/528383/forster-co-ax-single-stage-press-short-handle , much easier to work with. I do 7mag, .270, 30-06, and haven't felt the need for the unwieldly standard longer handle yet.

This guy makes a much better set of jaws for the press. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BpFD7NbvL8 . Worth it? Take Forsters jaws on/off a few times. Then you'll say YUP. I'm honestly surprised Forster hasn't bought this guy out or designed their own like this.

One thing I have found with the Forster press vs O-ring presses, is that the Forster forces you to sit more in front of it, to facilitate 2 handed operation, and thus slightly farther away from the workbench. The O-ring style presses are more open to your left hand placing and picking up cases. Lefties gotta work at it with O-ring presses. I managed to angle my press slightly on my bench to minimize this realization.

As u/unrulywind mentioned, a decapping die is nice to have so you can remove the primer, clean the case, then get to work without getting any grit into your dies, my choice https://www.midwayusa.com/product/211699/hornady-universal-depriming-and-decapping-die

As for neck sizing dies, they are something you could get later if you find a need for it. I'd wait until you are more familiar with the process, and then go with a bushing bump neck die like Forster makes https://www.forsterproducts.com/product/bushing-bump-neck-sizing-dies/ , or a Redding https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1018049293/redding-type-s-bushing-full-length-sizer-die . If you're going down this rabbit hole you would probably want to get a good neck turner/reamer https://www.midwayusa.com/case-neck-turners-and-reamers/br?cid=10455 . But going down this rabbit hole this early on is not necessary. Most never do. Aren't most of the bench-rest guys going with full length sizing now?

And as u/-RicFlair mentions, the comparator tools would be more useful to you earlier on than the neck sizing/reaming tools. This is the comparator body with bullet ogive inserts. https://www.brownells.com/reloading/measuring-tools/bullet-comparators/lnl-comparator-body-w-14-inserts-prod36535.aspx . You should be able to find just a body and a .30 cal insert. And then these fit the same comparator body but measure shoulder bump https://www.brownells.com/reloading/measuring-tools/bullet-comparators/sinclair-bump-gage-insert-prod35265.aspx . Just for clarity, all this paragraph attaches to your caliper tool, so as u/-RicFlair also mentions, this is a reason to have 2 or more calipers. I have one dial caliper (never needs batterys) and one electronic which makes it easier to zero-out the comparator body + insert, so you're getting true lengths without having to perform subtraction, or re-zeroing a dial caliper.

This electronic caliper has been found to be accurate and inexpensive and the one I use https://www.amazon.com/iGaging-ABSOLUTE-Digital-Electronic-Caliper/dp/B00INL0BTS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1525514664&sr=8-1&keywords=origincal . Keep extra 2032 batteries around! They give an extra battery in the case, but you don't want to be caught without. It matches up with my more expensive Brown & Sharpe dial caliper exactly, so far.

All my new cases also get prodded once with this tool https://www.midwayusa.com/product/729748/lyman-flash-hole-uniformer-tool . And after every firing (or 2) with one of these https://www.midwayusa.com/s?userSearchQuery=primer+pocket+cleaner&userItemsPerPage=48 . Note that the steel pin wet tumblers will clean this debris out, but the tool is so cheap why not have a manual version for those once off/extra dirty times.

Case cleaning: 4 choices in approx $ low-\>high - wipe by hand cloth - dry media tumbler - sonic solution wet vibe - steel pin wet tumbler. The last one is the latest invention and the one to go to if you want/need shiny clean. https://www.cabelas.com/product/shooting/reloading/case-cleaning/pc/104792580/c/104761080/sc/104661180/platinum-series-rotary-tumbler-l/1811194.uts?slotId=0 Does an amazing job. Do you want to wet tumble every time? Perhaps not, so one of these is the original standby https://www.cabelas.com/product/shooting/reloading/case-cleaning/pc/104792580/c/104761080/sc/104661180/thumlers-tumbler-ultra-vibe-tumbler/705516.uts?slotId=8 . Still using the one i got since um lets see 1972ish, so wow, yeah 46 yrs ago. LOL. I won't recommend any other dry media tumbler.

Powder measure - can't go wrong with something like this https://www.midwayusa.com/product/759813/redding-match-grade-3br-powder-measure-with-universal-metering-chamber . You might need a stand to go with https://www.midwayusa.com/product/552580/redding-rs-6-powder-measure-bench-stand . I see that Redding has come out with a few more powder measures since I last gandered at them, so pick what u want.

Powder Trickler - https://www.midwayusa.com/powder-tricklers/br?cid=9212 your pick, they all should be decent, but I'd pick the Frankford first, RCBS 2nd. $20 ish. The Redding is too short, don't know why they haven't realized it yet. Still good, but theres better for your money.

Powder funnel - https://www.midwayusa.com/s?userSearchQuery=powder+funnel&userItemsPerPage=48 . You can buy the pricey aluminum ones if you must have the best of the best, but the $5 jobbers have been doing the same job for a long time too, for the other 99.5% of us.

Scale - find an old used Lyman M5 or RCBS 505/510/1010 on ebay. Seriously. The ones that were made in good ole USofA. If it doesn't work to your satisfaction, there is a guy here that will re-tune to better than original. http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/tag/scott-parker/ . Or get an elec/batt scale. People seem to like the RCBS ChargeMaster https://www.cabelas.com/product/RCBS-reg-ChargeMaster-Combo/741110.uts?slotId=0

Pick up another couple reloading manuals, Hornadys and Noslers. You can find bullet/charge weights online too, but say power or internet goes out, you've nothing to do, so may as well reload some. You want to pick another load to work up. What do? One manual is not enough.

Also useful to find an older volume of the same manuals at gunshows/shops in your area. I think Hornady is up to 10th ed. Find a 2nd or 3rd ed. to see how much the lawyers have caught on to our game.

I know Forster is still made in USA. I think Redding and Hornady too. But RCBS has left this shore and it shows. Thats why my money goes to the first 3. You can't go wrong swapping their versions for what I've suggested here.

When you have another wad of cash burning a hole in your pocket, and you've digested what you're doing thus far, there are other gauges/accessories/rabbit holes to fall into and spend your hard earned dough on. Hit me up, I've got more suggestions.

Gotta like spending other peoples money !!!!

u/_ataraxia · 3 pointsr/ballpython

your BP isn't just thin, she's emaciated. you need to put some weight on her, but you need to do so gradually. you also really need to feed her f/t before she gets injured by live prey. if your enclosure is meeting her needs, and you're not causing her stress by handling her unnecessarily, she should eat f/t for you just fine. i guarantee she wasn't eating f/t at petsmart because she was stressed due to poor husbandry.

i'm going to dump a TON of information on you. some of it may be redundant, some of it may be useful. first, three detailed care sheets, a tub setup tutorial, and product recommendations to cover all types of enclosures. then i'll give you a breakdown of how i handled my emaciated BP, simultaneously putting weight on her safely and switching her from mice to rats. you'll fine more generalized feeding tips in the third care sheet. read everything thoroughly, then come back with any questions.

since i don't see any mention of what your enclosure is like, i'll start with this: glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.

    now for a suggested feeding regimen. if your BP will genuinely only eat live right now, you can safely start her on appropriately sized rat pinkies/fuzzies/pups. if their eyes haven't opened yet, they won't be able to bite her hard enough to cause injuries. once she fills out a little and can more comfortably skip a few meals, you should start working on switching her to f/t.

    at the time of rescue, my BP's weight was 140g, meals were one fuzzy mouse with an estimated weight of 5g, meal schedule was "once every few weeks". here's a breakdown of the meal sizes, schedule, and switch from mice to rats i used. this is all f/t, so dealing with live will be a little different.

  • week 1: settling in.
  • week 2: one fuzzy mouse, 5g, ~3% of BP's weight.
  • week 3: two fuzzy mice, total 8g, ~5%.
  • week 4: one fuzzy mouse, 5g. one rat pinky scented with the mouse, 5g. total 10g, ~7%.
  • week 5: BP weight 155g. one hopper mouse, 10g. one scented rat pinky, 6g. total 17g, ~10%.
  • week 6: one adult mouse, 14g. one scented rat pinky, 6g. total 19g, ~13%.
  • week 7: one fuzzy mouse, 4g. one scented rat pup, 20g. total 24g, ~15%.
  • week 8: BP weight 160g. one scented rat pup, 24g, ~15%.

    i continued scenting her rats for another couple of months, but that was more because it was easy [i have a corn who eats mice] than it being necessary. she was readily eating unscented rats within five months. a couple years later, i usually don't even have to warm up her rats beyond room temperature, though she does require some dangling with the tongs as she won't eat anything she hasn't "killed".
u/ThePienosaur · 11 pointsr/ballpython

Red light isn't good, you'll want a heat mat (MAKE SURE you have a thermostat for it or it will get too hot) and possibly a ceramic heat emitter (also needs a thermostat) for air heat. What are the temps and humidity and how do you measure them? Glass tanks usually don't hold humidity well and often aren't good for bps. You need at least 2 good hides, one for each side. They should be snug and enclosed with only one opening, preferably identical, half logs don't work.

Someone should come by with a really good care sheet, read it, it has some great info. I know this might be a lot of information, but having a good setup is important and will save you headaches in the future.

Edit: I found the care sheet. Credit to u/_ataraxia.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/skittlekitteh · 2 pointsr/snakes

Here's u/ataraxia's classic link dump I found on a other post. Although the informstion is written for bps (most common snake people have trouble with it seems- mostly due to the humedity) but the suggestions could definitely help you for the humedity aspect needed for your boa.


You should definitely read it through.

i'm going to dump a bunch of helpful links on you. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Cadder-12 · 6 pointsr/ballpython

I highly recommend you read the below information. Guaranteed that you'll be completely redoing your set up after reading all of this.

Credit: u/_ataraxia

The first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. Read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry, due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. Wood enclosures can also be suitable, if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. I'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.

    If you set up a good enclosure, and the temperatures and humidity are correct with no special treatment, the most work you need to do is feed every 1-2 weeks, spot clean the substrate and clean the water dish as needed [once or twice a week], and do a full enclosure cleaning every 1-6 months.
u/royalchameleon · 2 pointsr/3Dprinting

SAFETY GLASSES. Depending on how youre removing support material, those tiny peices of plastic can go flying, and I've ended up being saved by my blinking reflex more than once. Just get a cheap pair and use them. Support material will go flying towards your eyes, its not a safety cliche.

Everyone says to use a heat gun to clean up stringing(which can still occur even with near-perfect retraction settings, its just the nature of plastic.), but i prefer a butane pocket torch. Just quickly flicking the switch will vaporize the strings, without waiting for a loud heat gun to heat up, potentially warp your parts if theyre thin, and set it down to cool. Just dont hold a flame to your parts, they will ignite. A very brief(fraction of a second) flame works perfectly. If youre just using your printer for functional parts right now, dont worry about this.

A pair of curved tweezers for picking plastic off of the nozzle before/during(if youre OCD)/after a print (depending on how your cooler is setup). Side note- if your nozzle is really dirty, heat it up to ~200c and brush it with a wet qtip. Works great without scraping the nozzle with a wire brush.

X-acto blades #17 and #11. #17 is great for removing support material. Just please make sure youre not pushing the blade in the direction of your hand/leg/chest/eye/other body part.

As far as finishing prints- I've only used sandpaper, but a resin like xtc-3d is also popular.

Calipers. Get a nice pair of calipers.

As far as modding your printer.... https://www.trimcraftaviationrc.com/ has all the nuts & bolts you might need for great prices.

As far as software goes, I used to use simplify3d but after switching to slic3r prusa edition i think its amazing. Join https://www.facebook.com/groups/prusacommunity/ and get chris warcocki's pretty PLA profiles for slic3r. Really great facebook group, they'll keep you updated on all the latest mk3 improvements/news

Oh, and get some isopropyl alcohol, at least 90%. Wipe down the bed with it after every single print. Occasionally wipe with acetone, but not too often.

As far as filament goes, everyone has different recommendations. Avoid makergeeks. Great filament, horrible company. Atomic is great, but $30/kg which is a bit much for daily PLA, especially if its just going to be used for light brackets or whatever. I've been trying lots of manufacturers and i just ordered some makeshaper, i'll update in a few days if its lives up to the expectations.


Youre going to love your mk3.

u/beefjeeef · 9 pointsr/snakes


First of all. It's very good you recognize that you need help in learning how to care for the snake.

Second, here is a big link dump created by another regular user u/_ataraxia all credit for this goes to her.

the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/ryios · 3 pointsr/ATV

Not an expert, but

I'd focus on the drive train issues first, get all those tires working, might be a lost cause before going any deeper, but others will have to help with that, I take that kind of stuff to my mechanic.

Brake pedal could be that it's low on brake fluid, or one of the brake calipers is stuck.

My quad has a foot brake like that and a hand brake, but the foot brake only brakes 1 tire. That tire has two brake calipers on it's roter, one to the foot break and one to the hand brake. So the hand brake is all 4 wheels, and the foot brake is 1 wheel. There is a master cylinder on my hand brake and another on my right rear tire (foot brake). If my foot brakes master cylinder runs low or springs a leak, my pedal goes through the floor like in your pic but I'll still have brakes on the hand brake. It's like a double/emergency braking system. If my hand brake goes out I can down shift (engine brake) and lay on that foot brake to brake and not hit a tree...
___

Fuel wise, it's likely carburetor being old. The carburetor should have a primer on it that injects gas into the carb when you press/pull it. Those generally have a diaphragm in them (rubber) that tends to go bad over time and cause a fuel leak.

If you can find a diagram of the carburetor that would help emensely.

Really though, you should take the whole carburetor off, take it apart and give it a bath in carb cleaner (no plastic/rubber in there) and clean all the jets out.

Also, they make rebuild kits for most carb's that come with all new jets, and pilot screw etc. See if you can find one. I typically just replace them all, easier and then I have spares.

Also, inspect the carb's vent hose and make sure it's intact and not clogged. Check the fuel line too, for damage/rot.

You should also remove the gas tank and clean it out. Take the petcock off and inspect the filters and valve, then clean the whole gas tank out so there's no dirt/bad gas in there.

Then check/change the spark plug(s). Before running it though, I'd check the valve clearance on the valves, guides on that online.

Once all that's done, it should run good and not leak gas.

Then you can address your other issues.

Pending how old it is, there are some parts I might replace just because:

  • Voltage Regulator
  • Starter Solenoid
  • Starter

    If the current ones are working, call them spares.

    Starters and solenoids are cheap, voltage regulators OEM are expensive, but you can buy a few after markets pretty cheap to have spares.

    Tool wise, I can recommend at least the following:

  • Wire/Brushes
  • Jack/Lift
  • Compression Tester
  • [Feeler Guages] (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BYGIR4) You want these to go from at least .002 to .014 inches
  • [Caliper] (https://www.amazon.com/Neiko-01407A-Electronic-Digital-Caliper/dp/B000GSLKIW/) If you need to measure float height, you want to be accurate.
  • Angle Finder Useful for float height, as most carbs need to be held at a specific angle for accurate float height adjustment.

    Then your typical ratchet sets, air tools, impact guns, etc.

    And socket extensions (long ones) because getting to some things is a royal pita.
u/Vaporhead · 8 pointsr/snakes

u/ataraxia has amazing information for ball pythons. You should definitely read it through. Glass tanks are not ideal for Bps, so this should help. Here is her normal dump of information I took from another post.

i'm going to dump a bunch of helpful links on you. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/livinbythebay · 1 pointr/3Dprinting

Listen: this time I am going to help you out but please understand much of this hobby is learning to do stuff for yourself. There is a ton of problem solving based on intuition, ability to search for others solutions, and taking shit apart. You will not have very much fun if you aren't willing to put in the work.

For the time being just fold up pieces of paper to shim the feet. You really need a carpenters square and a line level to make sure everything is square.

Start with the table. If the surface you are trying to level your system on isn't level then leveling the system is going to be impossible. You want gravity to help you not hurt you.

[Here] (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1653631) is the link for z braces.

I also highly recommend [this mod] (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1454073)

Once those are installed and properly calibrated then everything on the frame should be square.

Next step is to get have you system properly trammed. That is essentially leveling the build plate to the extruder. With the pressed sheet metal plate on there it cannot be done properly. You need to get a much thicker aluminum carriage. Somebody else in this thread already offered to sell you one. I for one am a big fan of supporting the maker community and think you should take him up on that offer as the same thing online costs about the same amount.

Here are the tools you need to be successful in this endeavor. A proper magnetic line level. I got mine at harbor freight for a few dollars. A carpenter's square the bigger the better IMO about 1 foot on each side. And a good pair of calipers. The calipers are the most expensive tool on this list but you don't need top of the line Mitotuyos. At work we have the Mits but at home I use [these.] (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001AQEZ2W/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1)

If you are willing to put the time in this hobby is great, very informative, and useful for all times of machining in the future.

Good luck I wish you well.

u/dildoodlid · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

Welcome to homebrewing!

For that stout you probably want to be around 67, but your beer is fine, don't worry! Higher temperatures can impart off flavors, but at the temperatures you are at, your beer should taste just fine. I use this attached to a wine fridge or chest freezer, and it works wonders for keeping your fermentation temperature consistent (plus you can make lagers).

Cold crashing improves clarity, which is not a big concern for a stout so i wouldn't worry about it for now, it is totally not necessary.

Both of those beers would be good, and there is nothing wrong with extract brewing/kits, don't let anyone tell you different! That being said, i switched to biab (all grain) and have enjoyed it more and gotten better beers.

Lastly, as you get deeper into brewing water will become more of a concern, but for now don't worry too much about it. Grocery store water has two problems. First, you don't know whats in it, though some water companies like crystal geiser post the info online. 2. If it is distilled/reverse osmosis/filtered it will not have much of any minerals which you might want in your beer. Calcium, for example, is important for great beer, though you can add gypsum salt to your water to give it the calcium content you might want.

cheers and good luck with your new hobby, its very rewarding and a lot of fun. let me know if you have any questions and ill try to share my (limited) knowledge

u/OpticalNecessity · 5 pointsr/3Dprinting

I have a Maker select. It's my first and only 3D printer so my review compared to others is unreliable.

Here's a copy/paste of a review I did on it about a month ago. It's long but detailed with links:

I will give you my background before my opinions. As everyone has different goals, opinions, and experiences.

I got my printer near the end March of this year. I have something like 2500m of filament run though it, and no idea how much print time.

When I received my printer, my test prints failed and I was pissed. But this community helped improve my Cura settings and started producing usable parts. I then went nuts and printed out a BUNCH of mods. This is by far my most favorite thing. There's always something I can print to improve the quality of the prints.

THe down side is I went too far and got to a point where I couldn't produce anything of quality. So, 2 weeks of tweeking and researching later I'm printing in PETG with beautiful quality and very minimal visible layers.

My most recent project in PETG:
http://i.imgur.com/sVf7S2D.jpg?1

So, now to answer your question...

> How do you like your Maker Select?

I love it. It allowed me to buy a cheaper printer (One of the cheapest at the time @ $350) that produced amazing results. It also has upgrades you can purchase or print to improve the quality, so investing smaller amounts over time to make it better and better. I highly recommend it to anyone who is starting because it does require tweaking which forces you to learn and understand how exactly 3d printers work. A major plus was that this community has a lot of Maker Select users for support, which was a MAJOR plus for me.


As of today, I've purchased the following upgrades:

  • IKEA enclosure - $115
  • LEDs for Inside enclosure - $25
  • MK-9/10 Extruder Gear - $9
  • Micro Swiss All Metal hot End - $50
  • Micro Swiss Lever - $18 (Totally not necessary, but Micro Swiss's support was AMAZING to deal with, and I wanted to support them so I purchased this as well.
  • Misc. M3 and M4 Screws, etc. - ~$25 in total between Amazon Orders and Lowe's for things needed for mods.
  • New 40mm fan because I broke the blade on the one I had. There are cheaper ones than this. - $14
  • 50mm blower fan - $8

    So, in the last ~3 months I've spent an additional $264... Oh god, don't tell my wife! All are totally not necessary, mind you. The only thing I'd 100% recommend you do are print out the following to mods:

    DiiiCooler along with buying the 50mm blower fan. There are cheaper options out there, I just wanted it faster so I bought it through Amazon to get free 2 day shipping.

    z-Brace - This is key, and will run you maybe $15 worst case scenario to get enough M4 screws and the threaded rods.

    Edit: Forgot a couple more things I bought.

  • Lowe's glass - $4 for 2 pieces of 7.9"x7.9" glass
  • Borosilicate Glass - $12 - Amazing adheasing with PLA and ABS. Don't use it right now, though because I'm printing in PETG and I read on here that PETG eats borosilicate glass.
  • Lithium Grease - $7. When I changed my bearing blocks, I had issues with sticking so I purchased some of this to help smoothing out the bearing movement on the polished rods.
  • 3D print removal tool - $5. Printer comes with a larger scraper, but I needed something a bit more fine (thin) and this thing is perfect.
  • Spare bearings - $13 because I broke one of them when swapping to 3d Printed bearing blocks.
  • Digital Calipers - $18

    That's another $59, so $323... I have a problem. again, 95% of this is NOT NECESSARY. I'm just addicted to modding.

u/Keifru · 13 pointsr/Sneks

Sounds like you were getting outdated or flat-out incorrect information and those 'experienced snake owners' are likewise misinformed. There are very few snakes that legitimately have evolved to thrive on sand-based substrate (irony being the Sand Boa is not one of them; they live in sandy soil which is very different composition than straight sand). The Ball Python is native to the svannah/jungles of Sub-Saharan Africa. Its dirt, soil, and burrows. Not a majority or even significant amount of sand.

Additionally, if I extrapolate correctly from this singular picture, your BP is also in a glass enclosure and has a log-style hide. The former makes keeping humidity in the 55~80% range a difficult exercise, and the latter, is a stressor as BPs do best with a hide that has a single-entrance or is cave-like; the more points of contact, the better, and a single entrance means they can feel safer.

I'm going to steal _ataraxia's ball python dump and toss it below:

i'm going to dump a bunch of links to get you on the right track. the first three links are detailed care sheets, the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/rollapoid · 3 pointsr/ballpython

Reposting the famous u/ _ataraxia info:

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/FreakDC · 1 pointr/Amd

> It's 40 more watts on an overclocked R9 390. Most overclocked GTX 970s will exceed 210 watts when overclocked. Your "30-40%" number is a gross hyperbole, as 40w is actually 19% out of 210w.

Ok so now you are using overclocked cards, your efficiency goes down the drain if you overclock past a certain point.
Let's compare the numbers for factory overclocks on average gaming power draw:
 

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/MSI/GTX_970_Gaming/25.html
MSI GTX 970: 168W vs R9 290 in the same test: 239W -> 42.3%

 

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Sapphire/R9_390_Nitro/21.html
Here is an Sapphire R9 390 Nitro: 261W vs 168W for the MSI 970 -> 55.4%

 

We could compare maximum power draw instead of average but that doesn't really help your case:
MSI 970 213W vs Sapphire 390 365W -> 71.4%

 

Let's look at a slower clocked R9 390:
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Powercolor/R9_390_PCS_Plus/28.html
Average gameing power draw 231W vs 168W for the MSI 970 -> 37.5%

So I would not call that hyperbole, I would call that me being generous with the numbers ;).

> One, it can vary based on the displays used (of which they do not disclose), resolution, refresh rate, ect. There is not nearly enough data to call this an issue and not even the review you linked itself goes as far as to call it that because there simply isn't enough data.

How about that data, I, me personally have 3 different monitors, 3 different resolutions.
I usually don't throw away all my monitors and replace all of them, I usually upgrade one at a time.
I bet a lot of people use their old monitor as a secondary when upgrading, so they measure this power draws scenario for a reason.
Anyways, in my case the Sapphire R9 390 drew almost 90W when "idle" my MSI 970 draws about 16W.
It's night and day difference in noise and heat output. That R9 pulls more idle than my i7 at max torture load.

 

> This doesn't really prove anything. I've had loud GTX 970s and loud R9 390s. The only thing it proves is that some designs are better than others.

While I generally agree that this does not universally prove anything, keep in mind that all the 3 cards I tested have exceptional cooling solutions.
I run a silent PC that is almost inaudible if idle, and because I work 8 hours a day using this PC that's important to me personally. I choose those cards for a reason.
My case is not an ideal scenario for a high power card because the ventilation is limited (only 1 input fan on low RPM on idle + case is noise isolated does not have a lot of open air vents).

Still my scenario especially shows how much heat a card puts into a case because I like to keep the ventilation (noise) to a minimum.

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Sapphire/R9_390_Nitro/22.html
The Sapphire Nitro is a fantastic R9 variant.
0db when "idle" like the MSI 970 (which is why the Sapphire 390 was my first choice and the first card I tested as an upgrade in my current system).
Unfortunately in my case the card never really is "idle" because of the 3 monitors.
Like I said before, the gaming noise wasn't bad at all. The extra noise this card produces in my scenario is mostly due to the excess heat my case fans have to get out of my case.
Again I wouldn't really mind the noise level during gaming, or the extra power draw in that situation.
What killed this particular card for me was the idle power draw with my 3 monitors.

 

> Where are you even getting these numbers from? Every review I have seen has R9 390s at under 10w during idle.

I have something like this:
https://www.amazon.com/TS-836A-Energy-Voltage-Electricity-Monitor/dp/B00E945SJG
I measured my system power draw with my iGPU vs the power draw with the R9 390. Difference was almost 90w with all monitors attached.
This test has the R9 390 at 71 W idle with multiple monitors attached:
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Sapphire/R9_390_Nitro/21.html
I gladly admit that my measurement might not be super accurate and something like +-5W inaccuracy of measurement is possible.
I only had two monitors attached to the iGPU because it only has two connectors ;).
If you want we can call it 70W at idle with multiple monitors.

 

> Just going to point out that there are R9 390s with fans that don't turn on until 76c as well....

Yes and the Sapphire I tested is one of them. Sadly the card does not stay under 76 due to the power draw ;).
If I only had one monitor, or if they would fix the multi monitor issue,
the Sapphire 390 would be the better card compared e.g. with my 970.
If you don't mind the extra heat and electricity bill. (which is reasonable if you don't game that much or live where electricity is cheap).

 

> No one here was arguing otherwise but there is only so many shits that can be given about power consumption. If I wanted to worry about power usage I would buy a Nintendo switch.

Well this whole thread started when I addressed the claim of "AMD sucks because they run hot!!!!!!!1!".
If you care about power draw depends on where you live. Where I live, with my usage scenario (at least 8 hours a day drawing ~70 extra watts).
The extra cost of running the Sapphire 390 is 146kWh per year or roughly 40€ a year.
Let's assume you use your card for at least 2-3 years so that's 80-120€ extra cost.
That was the extra cost of a 980 back when I was looking for a new card. The 390 would lose that duel.
I realize, that if you live in the US or somewhere with low energy cost, the difference is much lower. (The national average was 12.99 cents per kwh).
$20 per year or 40-80$ for a 3 year period. Now if you remove the extra monitors, of if you only use the PC for gaming this will be even lower.
I'm fine with you not caring about it. I do.

 

> Low power consumption is nice, to a point. It stops becoming important when companies like Nvidia simply continue to cut down their die sizes to stave off performance improvements.

Whut? You cut down die size, because you can due to the 16nm process, to increase yield because that's how you make money. It's also more efficient :D.
Which is why Nvidia could improve perf/Watt immensely.
50% more efficient going from a 980Ti to a 1080Ti,
something like 70% more efficient going from a 970 to 1070,
up to 100% if you look the most favorable gains on the lower end.
On the other hand Vega 64 gives you barely more perf/Watt over a Fury X...

 

I don't agree that they starve off performance improvements. At least not unreasonably so.
Again, die size means profit. The smaller you can go while still improving performance the better.
Now if only AMD could bring a competitive card in the higher end... that would force Nvidia to give up more of their profits by cutting price or increasing die sizes again to stay competitive.
Again I came from an AMD card and I wanted to buy one again but I had to go with the 970.
Looking at Vega right now I have to say I'm not impressed yet.
Ryzen is a different story though, let's hope they can counter Intels next Hexacore line. Maybe I can go full AMD again, on my next machine.

 

My i7 3770 is starting to show its age, but only in some of my work tasks and the 970 is holding up surprisingly well at 1440p@60Hz during gaming.
I can probably wait for Zen 2, which should roughly come out around the same time as Volta and hopefully Navi is not too far away either.

Who knows, maybe by then AMD gets some support from the major deep learning frameworks, it looks like Vega would be a good card for that.

u/FlyingPotatoCubed · 1 pointr/RandomActsOfGaming

Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes.

Well, how serious are you? Cause if you're serious... here ya go

Otherwise, without knowing what you're into, it's a bit tough. Sushi Go! is an absolutely awesome card game - super easy to teach, pretty quick to play, but really fun for anyone. It's... "THE BOMB" at parties.

I would also extremely recommend Dominion, it's probably my favorite table-top game. However, I can't say it's for everyone.

I would absolutely love KTANE... wish I could buy it, but I've already spent way too much on games, and college is eating into my pockets. Thanks much! Sir Soaring Spud

u/qwicksilfer · 2 pointsr/AskReddit

Oh god. Okay. I feel like I've been preparing for this post my whole life (or at least since I found these awesome things on amazon):

u/mattzm · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

If he's an extract brewer, upgrading to an all-grain setup would be fun. Mash tuns, ported brewing kettles with temperature gauges and sight glasses, a nice gas burner or an all in one BIAB setup like the Unibrau or Wort Hog (especially if you have 240V power available, though 120v options are available). The latter two hit just around $1000 themselves but are ready to go out of the box.

If he's already an all-grain brewer in either multi-vessel or BIAB (or even if he's not), does he have a kegging setup? A good size chest freezer (consult the chart here for model numbers that fit the right number of kegs), a 4 pack of kegs with connectors, a gas manifold, a CO2 cylinder, and an Inkbird temperature controller will fall neatly within the budget range and is a significant "luxury" upgrade to buy all at once.

Already got that? He's probably already got fermentation temperature control if so, but if not, it's a nice one. This option tends to be the most awkward to just buy off the shelf and the temperature controlled conical fermenter I'm seeing runs around $1800, so its a bit out of budget. Again, a fridge or freezer with temperature controller are nice. I'd advise against a conical unless you know it will fit into his fermentation chamber. They are super sweet but they require a setup built with them in mind.

Already got all that? Ok, we're into the hilarious luxury items now. A reverse osmosis water setup? A high end pH meter? A giant stainless steel sink in his brewing area with one of those nifty shower head things for easy water filling and cleaning? A barrel of some kind for ageing? Can't help you past here, I'm too poor!

u/vengonw · 4 pointsr/treedibles

Oh absolutely. Most of the time I am making it for me and the wife to share so I dilute it more then I used to.

I heat 400 ml of everclear in a crockpot with a high accuracy temp controller added to it. here is the controller that I use. I set the temp to 160F and let the decarbed weed soak for most of the day, typically 6-8 hours. The temp controller holds to within +-1.5 degree when the crock pot is set to warm, so I just check on it about once an hour and give it a quick stirring.

After that I strain it through coffee filters a couple of times and reuse the everclear bottle to store it. I will give it a day or two to settle and then strain again. Once the bottle is free of particulates I do a test dose of 2ml and add more everclear to get it about where we like it. This typically makes between 500-750 ml. We then mix it into our drinks measuring with a micropipette. The wife will drop about 1-1.2 ml, I use around 2.5-3 ml. I like to float it on top of a vodka sprite to get my evening started.

For strength reference, I am a frequent smoker but not an all day toker. A good friend who is an all day toker will typically put a full teaspoon (5ml) in his hot tea when he wants to relax. 5ml puts me in orbit.


Do keep in mind that the strength of your tink will depend a lot on the quality of your weed. Living in a non legal state my batches vary a fair amount prior to adding more of the everclear. This is why I ALWAYS personally test each batch and adjust before I share with anyone.

Good luck, and don't hesitate to hit me up if you have questions. I am by no means an expert, but I have never had any complaints from anyone I have shared it with.

u/Absentee23 · 3 pointsr/RandomKindness

Although I need mine for my own hydroponic botanical needs, I can recommend the meter I use as a low-cost solution if nobody has one for you.

This is the one I use, and it's quite cheap at $15, but will still read just fine. Just get some calibration solution and check it a couple times between uses, until you are satisfied it is keeping calibration, then you can go longer without testing. I kept checking mine and it never lost calibration, so I've been pretty happy with it. It is not waterproof though, and after dropping mine in the reservoir I had to relearn how to read it due to to LCD cells lighting up when they shouldn't (so 5.8 read as 9.8 because the extra line on the 5 lit up.) After recalibrating, it was fine, just wonky to read, testing against drops and ph buffered nutrient solution (always sets itself to 5.8ph) showed it was calibrated fine. So just don't get it wet, and be careful not to break the probe putting the cap back on, as it's made of glass and the cap edge can crush it.

Another better quality one that I hope to get soon is this one, although it is more expensive at $50, it is also waterproof and just all around better quality.

u/trevthepally · 11 pointsr/cornsnakes

You're going to want to pick up something like this. You set a temperature and an acceptable threshold (i have mine varying by only one degree), and it will automatically turn the heat lamp off and on to keep it at a consistant temperature.

I also have a under-tank heat mat for my hot side, which is the main thing used to warm my snake. I absolutely recommend getting one to put under your tank. Corns like to burrow and will get more benefit to having one on the hot side. I just use the heat lamp to keep the ambient air in the tank at an acceptable level. You will want to get a separate controller for the heat mat.

Edit: I also have an Indoor/Outdoor Thermometer just chilling in the tank to get a more accurate reading inside. Your tank atmosphere is going to usually be a bit different than the atmosphere in your room. I have the "inside" number reading the ambient temp of the tank, the "outside" number reading the inside of the under-tank mat (controller probe goes between mat and glass on the outside, and this prob sticks to the glass on the inside under the substrate), and it also tells me the humidity in the tank.

You want to keep your numbers as consistant as possible. I like to shoot for 85 degrees on the hot side, 75 degrees on the cool side, and between 40%-60% humidty. I hope this information helps. Let me know if you have any questions.

Edit 2: GoHerping does a great care guide video on YouTube, which is where I got most of my setup and care info from. There is also a link to their discord on the YouTube page that is full of friendly people that can answer a lot of your questions.

Edit 3: You're going to be better off using a Ceramic Heat Emitter instead of a bulb. It just produces heat and no light, which will be better with the controller ( you don't want the light isn't constantly turning off and on). Corns don't need UVB either, and do fine with just natural lighting (assuming the light in the room still follows the normal day/night cycle).

u/beenyweenies · 1 pointr/computergraphics

As the others said, stick to Maya or 3ds max. Learning C4D once you know other packages is pretty easy, but for employment you really want one of the Autodesk packages.

Also, I've found the best way to learn to do 3D modeling is to do it as often as possible. No substitute for hours spent trying and failing. Almost everything you model has unique needs and requirements, so watching tutorials can only help so much. You need to just get in there and start creating, hit a wall on how some part of it should be made, then go research the best technique. A good example is how best to drill holes in surfaces, many people trip up on this.

I would recommend you start by choosing simple real-world objects and model them, whether they are things in your room or products, etc. Go on Amazon and buy a pair of calipers (such as these) and use them to take measurements of real world objects as you model them. This will help you get everything proportionally correct, AND make the job easier. Guessing proportions is a good way to make everything look off.

u/machinehead933 · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

> I have an extra fridge that doesn't stay super cold, but probably hovers in the the 40-60 range. Should I used it for fermentation/lagering? I would be willing to buy a temp controller later on, but I'd like to start using it now as a cool chamber to control my fermentation temps more readily. I don't think I can count on cool conditions in my garage come summertime in Texas.

That should be perfect for pretty much any brew

> I am building a small keezer from a haier chest freezer we picked up for free (wedding gift return/exchange). As for temperature control for that, should I get a simple outlet-plug in controller (more expensive) or can I possibly opt for a built in unit like this: http://www.amazon.com/All-Purpose-Temperature-Controller-Thermostat-Stc-1000/dp/B008KVCPH2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1381420269&sr=8-1&keywords=temperature+controller. I should mention I don't have electrical experience. I am trying to do this as cheaply as possible, and aesthetic is something of an issue- the keezer will be in our dining room.

The STC1000 is nice and cheap, but you do have to build a box for it, unless you want to wire it directly into the compressor. I too, have zero electical experience, and have not yet burned my house down with mine. I found these instructions to be particularly helpful.

u/rooksjeff · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

Question One: Fridge Temperature Control
There are several different units available to adjust the temperature of your fridge. The Johnson Controls A419 will control only cold (or heat if rewired), but the Inkbird ITC-308 will control both cold and heat.

I’ve used both and the Inkbird better fit my needs and is less expensive by more than half. There are other options available as well. Google something like “temperature control unit homebrewing” and you have plenty to read. As for wiring your own, I’m sure it’s possible, but I have no expertise in doing so.

Question Two: Carbonation Pressure
There are many different ways to carbonate your beer and several different gas blends available. Oxygen is not a good choice, as it will cause your beer to oxidize quickly - this common tastes like wet cardboard smells.

I only use carbon dioxide (CO2), but I do draft line consulting for a bar that uses a “beer blend” of 80% CO2 and 20% nitrogen. I can’t taste a difference and it pours the same, but that gas blend costs a little more. There may be other reasons to choose a specific blend that I am unaware of.

As for carbonating your kegs, what you described sounds like burst carbonation. Brulosophy has a great write up on different carbonation methods. I normally use the Set It And Forget It method, but will use the Burst method if I’m in a rush.

Question Three: Infusions
Not sure if you mean infusing the beer with flavors in the keg or glass or if you mean adding fruits or other flavors during fermentation.

To infuse in the keg, I use a mess bag to keep the liquid diptube from clogging. To infuse in the glass you can use a coffee press or even a Randall The Enamel Animal.

As for adding things to fermentation, fruits, hops, oak, spices, and liquor all make good additions to the right beer. Google phrases like “beer infusion recipes, “adding fruit to fermentation,” and “keg dry hopping” for more information.

Happy home brewing and good luck. Kanpai.

u/Robathome · 1 pointr/3Dprinting

Sorry for the delayed response!

I appreciate the compliment, sometimes I still get the feeling like I'm over my head with this stuff, but I still want to help however I can. Qui docet discit, as they say...

OK, if your results are coming back that far off, I would take a big step back and start with the basics. From what you've told me, my first guess is that the steps/mm for your towers is off. In your case, I would throw the assumption that your towers are all moving the same right out the window for now, and check each tower independently:

  • Remove the effector and the delta arms completely.

  • Use G28 to home the empty carriages to Z_max.

  • Pick a tower and stick a piece of tape on the column in a way that you can use as a reference for the starting position of the carriage on that tower. Personally, I put the bottom of the tape in line with the centerline of the lowest wheel. Technically speaking, you can do this for all three towers at the same time, but imho that increases the chances for human error.

  • Use G91 to switch to relative positioning, and then G1 Z-100 to (attempt to) move the towers down 100mm.

  • Put another piece of tape on the tower using the same reference point as you did before, and measure the distance between the two. If you don't have digital calipers, stand up, find your way to a hardware store, and buy them. Now. There is no tool more important in your 3D printing arsenal than a set of quality digital calipers. but I digress... If the distance between your reference points is not exactly 100.00mm, adjust your steps/mm... The simplest formula is

    (Current steps/mm) x (Expected mm traveled) / (Actual mm traveled)

    If that doesn't work, or if your steps/mm is still off, it's probably still a firmware setting, so try the following one at a time:

  • If you're using a microstepping, cut it in half, or quarters if you'd like (don't forget to do the same thing to your tower's steps/mm!!!). Oh, and if you're using interpolation, don't.

  • Trim down your max acceleration setting, again by 50% or 25%, and lower your speed settings too.

  • Quadruple-check that your bed is 100% flat, and make sure the points on the bed being probed are completely clean. I use FSRs, which uses nozzle-contact with the bed as the trigger. This method only works if the hotend is at operating temperature, otherwise there's likely a hard glob of plastic stuck to the tip of the nozzle. However, running it at temp while probing means that a tiny bit of plastic is left behind after every probe. For longer than I'd like to admit, these little blobs started stacking up and interfering with the probe results, even though they were barely visible!

    Don't give up! Running a 3D printer is an exercise in patience, and I find it extremely gratifying when it works! Trust me, you'll start keeping backups of your config settings, it's a hard lesson that most operators don't need to experience twice.

    What you're in the middle of is exactly the kind of situation where "you have to know how to walk before you can run" applies, except in an extreme case like this, you have to learn to crawl first.

    I'll help in whatever way I can! If you'd like, put your config and config-override files on pastebin, and I'll take a look to see if anything stands out!
u/OfficerPewPew · 1 pointr/300BLK

So this is a month old but I have some insight if you haven't already started a certain path.

I just bought a 300blk upper for my pistol. I have a lot of 223 brass I've saved to and decided to reload for 223 to save some money. Well I'm pretty well into reloading for 223 and decided i would start for 300blk as well. The equipment isn't too expensive (relatively) if you get some Cabela's sales and buy some discounted gift cards. Full equipment with necessary parts will run about $250 after everything (can be cheaper if you buy a bundle pack).

This kit

Digital caliper

Initial 300blk dies

Trimming die

Trimmer

Case lube

That's pretty much it for the equipment side. Then you'll need bullets, powders, and primers.

If you're starting out with 223 brass you may want to cut the case before trimming, but you'll need something to cut it with. If you buy some ammo to shoot and collect the casings you can't use them too.

I have everything I need for 300blk except powder pretty much. I just need to find something to use.

So $250 for equipment and 1k round of 223 reloading will cost me about $175. That's $425 for the first 1k round of just 223. Once I buy stuff for 308, 300blk, and 9mm I'll start saving in much higher quantities per round. I think I'll probably actually start saving money through reloading in a couple months if I shoot as regularly as I'd like. I still buy ammo on sales and all, so I typically don't count brass into my cost for a reloaded round. On average it's about $.18/round (for .223) if I don't find good deals.

Edit: so I just went through and did some calculating. .178cpr for 223, .285cpr for 300blk, and .362cpr for 308 of I get good sales and free shipping.

u/lucaspiller · 2 pointsr/homeautomation

Both of these devices will let you monitor how much energy your whole house is using, but the big thing about the Neurio device is it can supposedly detect which device is causing the spike in usage. As I understand from reviews it's a work in progress - it doesn't magically work out of the box, but you need to train it against your devices.

Non of these are going to magically help you save energy, I think you'd be better off just trying to figure out yourself what is using so much power (and put the money towards buying more energy efficient devices if you need to). If you want to measure how much power a device is using over a day, something like this will do (and even calculate the cost): https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00E945SJG

Your usage works out to be an average of 5kW which seems quite high (US average is about 1/10 of that) but without more details who knows. How big is your house? How many people live there? Do you have electric heating? AC on most of the year? A pool?

u/ATXBeermaker · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

It depends on how much you want to spend, but the easiest way to control temps is with a dedicated fermentation fridge with a temperature controller to regulate the temperature. I generally only need to regulate down (i.e., cool the fermenter to keep it from getting too warm), but some climates require a dual regulator to be able to either increase or decrease temp, especially depending on the seasons.

The cheapest regulator that's gained a lot of popularity in the community in the last few years is the STC-1000. There's a bit of DIY involved in connecting this controller to an actual electrical outlet. But it does dual control for around $30 total (once you buys the outlet, etc.).

If you're less handy but have the money, you can get a controller like this Ranco. There are tons of other options, so just Google "refrigerator temperature controller" or something.

There are also much less robust, but also much less expensive options. Google "fermentation swamp cooler" or "son of a fermentation chamber" for some good, low-cost, DIY options.

u/Sum_Dum_Guy · 1 pointr/CNC

Knowing that he made a 4 ft x 4 ft cnc machine, I would venture to guess it would be a cnc router and he is planning to mainly cut wood and maybe some aluminum. That said I really wouldn't buy expensive machinist tools if you wanted to better budget your money.


Here are some stuff that can be made on a cnc router:
http://www.shopbottools.com/mSupport/projects.htm


I'm assuming he may have told you what kind of stuff he could build or wanted to build when he said he wanted to build one. If it was for wood projects, then you can get a good 6 in. digital caliper under $40, such as these:


http://www.amazon.com/iGaging-Electronic-Digital-Fractions-Stainless/dp/B001AQEZ2W
I have the large readout version of that one by the way.


Not sure what he plans to use for clamping his stuff down to the table, but here's a great option:
http://www.rockler.com/hold-down-clamp-5-1-2l-x-1-1-8w


OK, you built a cnc router, but what do you make? Here are some 3D files for purchase:
http://www.vectorart3d.com/


This 3D router bit set will work for sign making (not sure what diameter bit he needs, and also add some spiral bits)

http://www.rockler.com/rockler-3-pc-signmaking-router-bit-set

This is a great work shop apron because these shoulder straps are more comfortable than the ones the just go around your neck. Also the mesh pockets let saw dust fall out instead of collecting in there.

http://m.duluthtrading.com/store/mens/mens-workshop/tool-bags-tool-belts/85021.aspx

If your not sure what he plans to cut them a gift card is always welcomed.

u/camron67 · 3 pointsr/Homebrewing

I've got three STC-1000s that I've ordered from multiple places and they have all been flashable - so I guess I've been lucky. The first two I bought from Amazon and the last one I bought from Alibaba although it took about 6 weeks to arrive. Mats has this link set directly on his Github page for the software so I figured this would be a really safe bet and it worked fine.

The flashing is pretty easy and there's a great instructional video on the blackboxbrew.com website. You'll need an Arduino Uno and some jumper wires which cost me about $20 at a specialty electronics shop. Best thing to do would be to ask around your homebrew club or brew shop if anyone has one that you could borrow. One guy brought his to a brew club meeting and flashed a whole bunch of peoples all at once.

Good luck with the build and feel free to hit me up for any questions. Go Leafs!

u/noncongruent · 2 pointsr/DIY

One won't be near enough, though that depends on its size. As far as heat transfer, yeah, wort doesn't pump well at all, and if anything, keeping it circulation as opposed to still would probably give the little yeasties some indigestion. I can imagine a complex system of tubing, heat sinks, pumps, and heat exchange fluid, but that's probably beyond most people's motivations and abilities. I think that you can make essentially an insulated box that's cooled by the Peltiers, essentially a refrigerator, and use a glass carboy for better thermal transfer to the fluid.

For example:

https://www.mpja.com/Peltier-Cooling-Assembly-12VDC/productinfo/15312+PM

This module uses 6A at 12VDC to move just 170 Btu of heat. Fermentation is exothermic, so let's do some math. According to this:

https://byo.com/article/fermentation-temperature-control-tips-from-the-pros/

It's possible for the fermentation process to raise the temperature 20°F in 6 hours. A common batch size is 5 gallons. A BTU is the amount of heat necessarily to raise one pound of water one degree F. A gallon is 8 lbs, so to raise 5 gallons, which is 40 lbs, of wort 20°F takes 40x20=800 BTU, and to do it in 6 hours takes 800/6= 133.3 BTUh.

The main physical problem with Peltiers is that the hot and cold side heat sinks have to be close together, and that makes it difficult to use them in an insulated box because insulation requires thickness to be effective. You'll need fans, both internal and external, to move air past the heat sinks, and in the inside, to keep it circulating. Putting the modules in the lid would probably be the most effective solution as hot air rises and that brings that air to the modules via convection.

The more I think about this, the more difficult and expensive it looks, honestly. If you're lagering, I think you'd actually be better off money and power wise using a small refrigerator. Actually, maybe a small chest-style freezer with an external thermostat controller to turn it into a refrigerator might be a more practical approach. In fact, here's a decent one on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Inkbird-Thermostat-Temperature-Controller-Fermentation/dp/B015E2UFGM/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=Inkbird+ITC308&qid=1568383520&s=industrial&sr=1-4

That being said, it sounds like an interesting series of experiments to try!

u/Mitten_Punch · 2 pointsr/microgrowery

Cool. Very helpful.

The LED/HPS price gap is worth it, in the United States, where I can get HLG Quantum Boards or parts from Digikey without paying VAT/import tax. The LED panels on EBay are not worth buying. But if you can get current, best-gen LED, then yes, it's worthwhile. They cost ~40% less to run and cool, and you don't have to change bulbs like you do with HID lighting. Even if they cost 2x or 3x up front, you'll make that back in a year.

On to your setup: Things look good.

  • Secret Jardin is more expensive (again, in my market) then it should be. There isn't a lot of difference between a $60 1mx1m tent and a $120 1m SJ tent. Spend that money elsewhere.

  • For a ~3'x3' space, the 400w HID is the appropriate light. Get a dimmable ballast, so you can run a Metal Halide bulb during veg at 200w or 300w, then use your HPS at 400w for flower. If money is a worry, for now, buy cheap bulbs. Down the road you may want to buy nicer HPS bulbs (Eye Hortilux is the best, in my experience). But, for now, cheap is fine. Take a look at CoolTube kits. I'm only seeing this one, there must be more. Buying the bundle should save some money.

  • If possible, run a duct-fan (Winflex) just for your light. So, outside of tent -> ducting -> CoolTube + light -> ducting -> outside of tent. The air cooling the bulb should be separate from the air in your tent. And that fan runs whenever the light it on.

  • You want an inline (Can Fan) as your exhaust. And you want a programmable thermostat. . .although maybe not this one, if you are on 220v power. The idea is, only have the exhaust fan turn on when it needs to. In my situation, that is a 76F degree goal. When the tent hits 80, it kicks on and runs until it's below 76 again. This helps your carbon filter last longer, and also lets humidity/warmth build up as it needs to.

  • Pot sizes: I have a 1m/1m tent. I've run 6 x 3gallon pots. And 1 x 10gallon. So, it depends on how many plants you are growing. But aim for 15 gallons on soil total.
u/shrike1978 · 2 pointsr/snakes

Aspen is good for them. They're not a high humidity species and are generally fine with ambient humidity. If it has trouble shedding, you can just add a humid hide box. Give it a basking temp of 85-90F, and the rest of the enclosure will be fine at room temperature (as long as your room stays above 70F or so). I don't have direct experience with pueblan milksnakes, but I know my kingsnake (a very close relative) likes to bask occasionally, and will actually use all the vertical space I give him, both climbing and burrowing. Pueblans stay relatively small, 3-4', so anything in the range of a 40G breeder and up will be fine for them.

General advice for all snakes: You need at least two identical hides, one on the warm side, one on the cool side. These should be small and tight...snakes like to wedge into tiny spaces so they should be able to touch at least three walls of the hide. They should have one entrance, so those half log things are not good hides. The more cluttered the tank the better. They will climb, so give them stuff to climb on, and milks will burrow, so give them at least 3 or 4 inches of substrate.

I recommend overhead heat instead of under tank. It provides a more natural heat gradient that better mimics what they encounter in the wild. The heat source should be something like a ceramic heat emitter or a deep heat projector. Don't use a heat source that puts off visible light because the heat will need to be run 24/7. All heat sources must be on a thermostat. My cheap thermostat recommendation is the Inkbird ITC-306T. My high end recommendation is the Herpstat (I linked the Intro+, but there are higher end models available as well). The difference in the two is that the Inkbird is an on/off type, and the temp will swing a few degrees around the set point, while the Herpstat is proportional and will hold the temp to within a degree of the set point.

If you wish to provide light as well, use either an LED for just light, or if you want to provide UVB as well (not necessary, but may possibly be beneficial), use a 5% or 5.0 UVB bulb (I recommend ZooMed or Arcadia only...some other brands have been show to put out dangerous UVB levels as they age). UVB bulbs need to be replaced periodically because their UVB output will fade as they age. Bulbs that put out visible light should be on a timer to provide a 12/12 day/night cycle.

Finally, feed in the enclosure. Don't move to feed. Moving to feed is based on an old, disproven myth, and causes stress to the snake. And feed frozen/thawed, not live. There is no benefit to live feeding, only danger.

u/HaggarShoes · 2 pointsr/fermentation

What's the unit of measurement for your dimensions?

If you want to go super cheap, I imagine you could could get a temperature regulator (two outlets and 1 temp probe); you could run a dedicated fan next to a space heater to keep the temperature moving around the space, while the probe sits somewhere in the middle of the room. You can set a temp range where on the low it would pop on the heater, and when it hits the top temperature it shuts off (and you could attach another fan in another part of the room/wall of the incubator to the other outlet which would switch on once it hits the top of the temp spectrum you hit to promote ventiliation and more quickly cool it down).

The space heater I suppose would be overkill for a 2 foot container, but if it's 6 feet (meters) it would be a lot. You could even scrap the extra fan by getting a heater that oscillates with a fan and then use the second outlet, again, to promote ventilation.

Not sure how ideal this would be for super consistent temperatures, but temp regulators are pretty darn cheap. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B011296704/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1 is what I used with a medium sized styrofoam cooler and a 60W bulb. It worked quite well.

u/nexusgx · 11 pointsr/functionalprint

I cant' speak for other people, but in my case, I have an interest in building and making things outside of work, so I have invested time into learning how to use Fusion 360, and also purchased calipers (specifically this one) to get accurate measurements.

For this particular model, I had the broken part, and could measure everything using the pieces I had and the calipers. Using those measurements I could use Fusion 360 to model the part.

If you want to get started with making your own things, I would suggest first learning a program like Fusion. Tinkercad is a great starting point for people with no 3D modeling experience because it's free and is easier than a CAD program. Once you are comfortable with that, I would start tinkering with Fusion 360. Maker's Muse has a playlist that was helpful for me.

From there, it's whatever you think of to create.

u/GrowMender · 1 pointr/microgrowery

Veg week 2 of clones obtained from my local medical collective. First nutrient feeding at half strength (3tsp/gallon of Fox Farm Big Bloom). LST started on all plants with the GDP starting 2 days later then the others. Did some minimal pruning after the LST settled to get things out of the dirt and clean out some leaves that weren't getting any light. Growth seemed to slow a bit for a few days, might have shocked them a bit from being rough with them, but they are doing great now. Thinking of extending my veg an extra week to compensate, will wait and see if that will even be necessary.

Noticed some small bite marks taken out of a leaf, so I decided not to take any chances and got some AzaMax and gave the girls a good shower at about 0.4% concentration. I will be following that up with a few more applications over the next couple weeks. I'm debating if I want to do a soil drench as well. I also got a gnat sticks that already caught one of the bastards.

Temps with lights on have remained stable around 79F and the RH about 40%. Lights off with fan at 20% temps get to 67F at the lowest and 50% RH at the highest. Also have some new goodies coming from Amazon in the next few days to improve my setup like an Oakton pH2 and rope hangers with metal internal gears instead of those cheapo plastic ones that came with my lights.

 

    Strains

Blue Dream - DJ Short x Santa Cruz Haze. 80% Sativa / 20% Indica. 7-8 week flower cycle

Boy Scout Cookies - Girl Scout Cookies Thin Mint x Pre-98 Bubba Kush. 60% Indica / 40% Sativa. 8 week flower cycle.

Darth Vader Haze - 4-way Black Haze Black Cross. 100% Sativa. 9-10 week flower cycle.

Grand Daddy Purple - Big Bud x Purple Urkle. Indicia Dominant. 8-9 week flower cycle.

 

 

Veg Week 1 Reddit Post - Album

u/DrDreads420 · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

I've got one. I like it a lot. You definitely have to be aware of some of it's pit falls and plan accordingly. (In particular: making sure the thing doesn't leak, unscrewing the collection ball without unscrewing the valve from the tank, using a "S" style airlock instead of a three-piece style to prevent suck back when changing out the collection ball or bottling/kegging, and not using recipes that have tons of trub or hops.) If you know those pitfalls and take steps to avoid them, then the fast fermenter is really pretty awesome. The best way I've found to prevent leaks is to use the included teflon tape, and then use keg lube on all the joints. It is super easy to clean because of the wide opening on top. I clean mine right after use, I haven't really noticed any lingering smells. As for temp control - I sewed up a jacket for it with heating wires and a water tube in it. kinda similar to this system. A temp controller monitors the temp and turns the heat on, or turns a water pump on to recirculate ice water from a cooler. The thing comes with a wall mount bracket, I built a stand for mine using 2x4's and the wall mount bracket.

All in all- if you know about the pitfalls and how to avoid them, the thing actually makes your life a lot simpler and easier. It allows you to do a secondary fermentation without having to rack to a second fermentor(thus avoiding all the work of sanitizing all that extra equipment). It allows you to harvest yeast. And bottling/Kegging is a breeze.

u/thatsnotmybike · 6 pointsr/microgrowery

I would go with a 4'x4' tent at the very least; the one you've linked is too small for a 1000W lamp. I'm doing 4x3x7 right now with 1000W and it's really not easy to keep it cool, I'll often hit 88-90F even with AC in the room. A little bit larger space and it would be much more comfortable.

What are your plans for a growing medium? This might be more important than anything else you're buying! There are also a million options between soil, coco, and the various hydro setups like DWC, ebb and flow, etc. I've had good results with coco coir. You might be best off starting with a decent soil like the Fox Farms lines - pH is much easier to manage in soil.

Speaking of, you also want a good pH meter, and pH up and down. Just get the General Hydroponics pH test kit - it's cheap and you'll have enough to fix pH for your entire grow. For a meter, I recommend this Oakton unit. You'll also want some pH calibration/storage fluid to maintain it properly.

u/LsDmT · 1 pointr/microgrowery

if you want something simple and insanely well priced when compared to other nutrients then check out dyna-gro.

dynagro foliage pro + pro-tekt and you will be years above most other growers. just focus on your environment which IMHO is the most important thing.

what is good about dynagro is it has everything in it as a base nutrient. with most other products (botanicare, GH, and famously Adv Nutrients) the base leaves out C and MG and micro nutrients.

Protekt is a silica additive that makes the plants noticeably stronger and thicker healthier stems.

If you call dynagro's number you can get a starter kit with a PK booster (used around week 4 and 7 of flower).


If you only want to water once every few days I suggest a hempy bucket https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=98419

You can do a coco hempy bucket too and is very popular as well. if you decide to go that route make sure to grab some botanicare Calmag. So your list would be dynagro foliage pro/dynagro protekt/botanicare calmag.

You will 100% need to buy a PH meter and I strongly advise an EC/PPM meter. These are the ones I use

https://smile.amazon.com/Oakton-EcoTestr-Waterproof-Tester-Range/dp/B004G8PWAU/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1479005211&sr=8-13&keywords=ph+meter
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B01FPG89CE/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

In a hempy bucket and coco always PH to 5.5-6.2

If you were to put the plants in your pic in to a 3 gallon hempy bucket with vermiculite and perlite for the first 2-3 weeks you are going to want to water once every 2/3 days until a little bit of water flows out. Then when they get big once per day.

I would strongly, strongly suggest not using CFL's. It would be a better investment to get a 250-600w HPS. they are really cheap on amazon. If you go with 250w you dont want the plants to get bigger then a foot or so before you flip the schedule to 12 hours on and 12 hours off.

150W - LINK - Grow 1-4 small plants

600W - LINK - Grow 4-6 medium plants


Dont spend so much time on nutrients and what type of grow medium and focus mostly on keeping a good enviornment in terms of temp and humidity and fresh air. You also need to consider when you flower the room needs to be 100% dark. Even a tiny pinhole of light coming in can be very bad

u/DFrostedWangsAccount · 6 pointsr/3Dprinting

You can be assembled and printing with the included tools in about half an hour, with no prior 3D printer experience. That's not a problem.

Actually getting the most out of the printer though, that depends on what you want to use it for.

I use it for making functional prints, replacement parts, and sometimes cool trinkets. I am not an artist, if you want to model and print sculptures, good luck. I haven't a clue.

If you're like me and want to make what I make, here's a list of things you should get:

  • Calipers. Measuring is so important. I have these.
  • M3 nuts/bolts. Possibly also M4 and M5 depending on what you're putting together. I bought this.
  • Nylon locknuts. They won't shake loose over time, good for making thumbscrews with. My choice.

    Things you should print:

  • Z-braces.
  • DiiiCooler
  • Thumbscrews, there are loads of M3 nyloc-insert thumbscrew designs on thingiverse, pick one you like the look of. The ones that came with the printer sucked though, and nylocs are great.

    Things you should download:

  • Get the latest Cura, I think it might still be in beta. Don't use the version it comes with, you'll be missing out.
  • Fusion 360. It's free for hobbyists and businesses making under 100k/yr. Learn to use it.
  • Not a download, but try some Tinkercad tutorials and see what you think of that. It's more of a "light" software than Fusion is, meant for children, but both have their place and have slightly different features, despite being made by the same people. Sometimes Tinkercad is easier to use than Fusion for a certain task, most of the time it's the other way around for me though.

    While I'm making suggestions, I'd say you should get some PLA and PETG to start with, ignore ABS entirely. It's slightly cheaper per kilogram, but there are toxic fumes to worry about and it really needs an enclosure to print (well).

    PLA is cheap enough, but doesn't flex as much as ABS so it's better for different applications. PETG is like the best parts of PLA and ABS, but you have to print at lower speeds.

    I print at 45mm/s, 5 second minimum layer time using both PLA and PETG and it works perfectly. 210C/60C for PLA and 250/70 for PETG.

    If you have any questions, you know where to find me. :)
u/anonymoose_octopus · 1 pointr/bettafish

Buy an Inkbird Temperature Controller. I also worry about this, but since I've installed these for my tanks it's like a weight off my shoulders. You basically plug the heater into it, and once the thermometer built into the device reads that it's at your desired temperature, it cuts the power to the heater. It's a great device for peace of mind.

Just to put your mind a little more at ease though, I think heater related fires are very rare, and probably because someone wasn't using it correctly or heating their tanks too much. I've heard great things about Hydor 50W (and I'm actually using the 25W right now with no controller). You're fine. :)

u/veni_vidi_vale · 4 pointsr/headphones

Cool experiment, OP!

I have a couple of suggestions.

First, why not pick one or two very popular (and therefore most people will know them) songs from the 80s, 90s, 2000s, and recent Top 40 hits. That way almost everyone who participates in your experiment will have some idea of the song structure, rather than have to wade through an esoteric song they are unfamiliar with.

Second, get one of these. It's cheap, but useful, and will allow you to adjust the volume of each listening station (and song) so that the lossy and lossless songs are of equal volume (folks tend to think that the louder of 2 versions of a song is "better", so by using a decibel meter you prevent that particular bias)

Third, you may want to pick a very lossy version of a song (something like 96k mp3 (lossy) and have folks compare it with flac. Many people may be able to tell the difference. Now have them compare flac with something like 320k mp3. You may be surprised by the results.

And finally, if you are using M50Xs, it is only fair to pick a good dubstep song that wakes up the listener and slaps them around a bit. You know, something like this :-)

u/Pfffffbro · 1 pointr/microgrowery

No problemo!

This is a moderately pricey pen, but it's fantastic, I've owned two of them (one dried up because I forgot to add water to the cap(need to keep the sensor thing wet)). https://www.amazon.com/Bluelab-PENPH-Pen-Plant-Germination/dp/B005POOJHG/ref=asc_df_B005POOJHG/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=167118301188&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=16523942976628365276&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9033565&hvtargid=pla-311195096389&psc=1

If you can't afford to do that yet (I would recommend it in the future if you're going to grow, it's months and months and months of feeding every couple days, a good pen is a great benefit to your grow) then the Hanna one will work, but it is less reliable for the long run. https://www.saltwateraquarium.com/hi98103-checker-ph-tester-with-0-1-ph-resolution-hanna-instruments/?gclid=Cj0KCQiAw5_fBRCSARIsAGodhk_YcmPTvhggiq3-aAIYcxhWBLPLL8HVepUW0QgXr7QHghSiTX1SOREaAoMyEALw_wcB

Right on - what exact kind of soil are you using?

u/Spaceman_Spif · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

I just looked into buying one last year. There's not much under 40 that gives two decimal digits with good accuracy. I ended up inheriting this one that is $97. I'm not convinced that 2 digits is necessary for brewing, but I'm very happy with the Hanna.

If you're just getting into water chemistry and are looking to save money, I'd go with something like this. Good luck!

u/alienwrkshop51 · 5 pointsr/Charcuterie

This. Is. Awesome.

I currently have a Monster cooler like this that is set up as a curing chamber with a simple temperature and humidity controller.

I would love to be able to integrate something like what you made into my setup. The data logging and interface are super nifty! Definitely let us know when/if you pull something together.

u/fagggyyy · 2 pointsr/microgrowery

+1 for Apera, I just decided on this one by them. It was ~15 dollars more expensive than the model you have, but the increased pH sensitivity as well as the fact that it includes storage solution was more than enough for me to be willing to shell out the few extra bucks. Also, another super cool feature of this model is that you can buy replacement probes if you ever damage your current one, which will save you money in the long run. These also seemed to have a consistently higher rating than any other pH pens I looked at on amazon, and their customer service is pretty stellar from what I've gathered. Look into these too OP!

u/brycebgood · 2 pointsr/Hunting

Craigslist freezer - we chose upright for vertical space. Chest freezer might work - but you would have to figure out how to hang in it.

Temperature controller - there are lots of options. This one is the Johnson 419. You plug it into the wall then plug the freezer into the female lead. It cycles the freezer on and off at the set temperature. There are cheaper options - but I had this one laying around. I'll link some suggestions below.

The fan is a computer fan with speed switch. I wired it to an old 12v wall wort I had laying around in the parts bin.

Meat hooks are just stainless hooks - again from amazon.



Temp controllers:
Johnson - https://www.amazon.com/Johnson-Controls-Digital-Thermostat-Control/dp/B00368D6JA/ref=pd_sim_328_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=SG7X9CB5Z0VYY8RM7EVB

If you're comfortable with electricity:
https://www.amazon.com/Lerway-All-Purpose-Temperature-Controller-Thermostat/dp/B00BMLCGF8/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1481133568&sr=8-2&keywords=temperature+control

Best deal:
https://www.amazon.com/Inkbird-Temperature-Controller-Thermostat-Fermentation/dp/B015E2UFGM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1481133568&sr=8-1&keywords=temperature+control



Meat hooks:
https://www.amazon.com/Meat-Hooks-Inch-Pack-Pieces/dp/B0195CE08Q/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1481133886&sr=8-3&keywords=meat+hooks



Fan:
https://www.amazon.com/Antec-TriCool-DBB-Cooling-3-Speed/dp/B00066ISES/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1481133824&sr=8-5&keywords=speed+fan+computer

u/le_chef_boyardee · 3 pointsr/microgrowery

DWC is pretty straightforward. Maybe look into Hydroguard to protect roots a bit more. Read instructions carefully. no light needs to go inside... so make sure you have a black bucket, opaque basket and enough medium in basket. Black air tubing not transparent. watch th PH with a good ph pen and EC with wand meter like this or this . aim for ph 5.5 to 6.5. Good luck, DWC is fun.

Found this video that has good info. dwc

u/CJOttawa · 2 pointsr/preppers

You mentioned the basics... how about electricity? I'm specifically thinking of a portable solar arrays, and some multipurpose chargers, batteries devices. Here are a few links of interest:

Super portable 21Watt version that has USB outs:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B012YUJJM8/

Bigger model but capable of charging 12Volt batteries (I'm thinking trickle charging a car battery):
http://www.amazon.com/Charger-Backpacking-Battery-Foldable-Cellphone/dp/B00VBSFT74/

Multimeter for displaying power output:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00J3JSEG6/
(useful for positioning the solar cells for best power)

ThruNite U1 charger and battery; acts as not only a charger for NiCad, NiMH, and Li-Ion cells of varying sizes, but also (drum roll) can be used as a USB powerpack:

http://www.amazon.com/ThruNite-Charger-1x3400mAh-Multifunction-Portable/dp/B00WFXWUOE/

Then, standardize on lights that use 18650 cells as they're way, way better than NiMH (higher power, better capacity, longer life):

http://www.amazon.com/Bundle-Nitecore-Rechargeable-Flashlight-EASTSHINE/dp/B00VG1J8S2/

Oh, random idea... small stove that'll burn wood and comes with a backup alcohol burner:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0088FVZZI/

u/HumidNut · 1 pointr/reloading
  1. Off the top of my head, for rifle you need calipers, case trimmer, die set to get started. Bullet puller, notebook, primer pocket swager is often of use.
  2. The 5-0-5 scale is wonderful. Works without batteries, accurate and repeatable.
  3. Depends on your scope of use. For the absolute smallest "holes on paper" consistency is key. With speed comes compromise. I use a powered trimmer (Frankfort Arsenal Case Case Prep Center with replacement rcbs Carbide cutter) but I'm balancing volume over absolute precision. +/- 002" is good enough for my skills and firearms.
  4. Sounds good, thats what I use, but opinions vary.
  5. I picked up this iGaging several years ago, its been good to me. No outstanding issues, but I'm not a professional machinist.
  6. All my stuff is legacy and the newest press I have is a 2015 Forster Co-Ax and I find it terrible for on-press priming. I prefer hand-priming to judge my brass' primer pocket feel (time to load one more time and chuck it).


    So with your scope of use, reloading might not be the path best taken given the monetary outlay. There's plenty of scary good factory ammo (I'm a fan of the Hornady SuperPerformance line) where it does almost as good as my reloads, minus the hassle and labor. If you said you were shooting 69/77gr match stuff, I could almost definitely tell you to fire up the press.

    If you intend to reload for other centerfire, especially large bore, or rimmed stuff, then the decision to grab a press is almost a given.
u/b8nn8n · 2 pointsr/gardening

The meter is a matter of preference. I would shop based on how it's calibrated...some use 6.86 and 4.01 solutions but meters that calibrate at 7 & 4 may be more expensive but those solutions are cheaper. I have had probes break too so don't go crazy on price. I like this one because of the case it comes with along with the calibrating fluid. I would also get some sort of dropper it will help to adjust your ph. If it is just clean water a single drop of ph down will lower the oh by several points. Aim for 5.5-6.5

Draining and replacing the water won't solve your issue right away. As long as the plant stays alive and growing it should be fine. If you can remove the plant out of the bucket and run some water over it for a few minutes and replace the water it would probably help.

Edit: found a photo of my tomato last year. This thing got like 8ft tall.

http://imgur.com/a/cpSRuql

u/Focus62 · 2 pointsr/DartFrog

I just went through this with by 12”x12”x18” gecko tank. There is so little real estate on the screen top that I had to get kinda creative. Forgive the pink foam insulation on the sides and ignore the gauge outside the tank (just monitoring my room temp), it’s an ugly winter setup but it helps keep the heat in! So, in my the hood, which can only hold one bulb, I have a Jungle Dawn LED, same with the free floating one hanging from the left side of the tank. The one in the clamp lamp (attached to a square dowel rod sticking up at the back) is a 50W ceramic heat emitter. I use an Inkbird thermostat that allows me to set two temperature windows for different times of day and a degree differential. So in the day time, it keeps the temps between 74-76 (2 degree differential meaning it hits 76 then turns off the lamp and when it hits 74 it turns it back on) and night between 68-70. This achieves a good temp gradient for me, the bottom of the tank is typically 72-73, middle (where I have the probe) is 74-76, top usually has a nice little hotspot on his branch around 78 during the day. Ceramic heat emitters (or really any heat bulb I would imagine) can majorly dry out your tank though so keep an eye on your humidity levels. An auto misting system would probably help a lot.

u/DSNT_GET_NOVLTY_ACNT · 10 pointsr/Homebrewing

Don't do the open refrigerator thing, you will waste a ton of electricity and won't actually be able to temperature control even close to enough to lager with any reasonable degree of certainty. If I had to guess, leaving a fridge with an open door for a month will probably waste far more than $16.

Instead of wasting that $16 in electricity, you can get one of these, which is perfect for a fermentation chamber made from a fridge. A small amount of wiring work is required, but it's relatively easy.

If you aren't willing to invest $16 and an hour figuring out how to wire it together, I would suggest just letting it ride without temperature control (or maybe a swamp cooler or similar). Most lager yeasts will be fine in the low-mid 60s.

Edit to note: it's not too late by any means to get that temp control part now. You could start it warm and chill down in the refrigerator when you have the part, possibly even complete fermentation warmish and then stick in the refrigerator on its highest setting for a few weeks. Or you could start it in the refrigerator on its highest setting and let it warm up a bit more when you have the part. Leaving the fridge open is probably the worst choice you could make out of all the options above.

Double edit: If you don't want to mess with wires, you could get one of these, but it's more expensive. It's basically the same thing as the cheaper one, but with plugs.

Bonus fun fact edit: Refrigerators make the room warmer in general, but peaving the refrigerator door open will make it even warmer. You would be effectively making a really really ridiculously inefficient space heater.

u/JimmyTheDoor · 2 pointsr/pcmasterrace

Okay let's use logic here, every part of the computer has been swapped or changed so we can eliminate the components from the equation.

3 things are left.

  1. Peripherals.
  2. Power to the computer (your house alternative current might fluctuate too much, try one of these)
  3. Error 18. ^(error that happens 18 inches in front of the screen, (that means : You))

    Try with a different set of peripherals, clean instal using different keyboard, mouse and monitor.

    ​

    Check the voltage that your outlet outputs into your PSU, I know these units are meant to regulate voltage and this should not be an issue but if it's too important of a variations, even for split seconds, it can damage/render unusable certain components.

    ​

    Make sure you plug everything properly, motherboard 24pins are hard to plug in, make sure it's all the way in there.

    Standoffs behind motherboard? Proper power cables to graphics card? PSU strong enough to drive all components?

    Any overheating component ^(try) HWMonitor?

    ​

    Maybe formatting isn't getting rid of a ferocious virus created by the lord of pain in the ass himself.

    ​

    So many things can be at cause here, hope this helps, never stop trying you magnificent warrior, those 3 years weren't for nothing!

    ​

    EDIT : My girlfriend mentioned : internet connection. try clean install offline and see if it only happens when online maybe ?
u/camham61 · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

You can look at my recent post to see how mine is coming. I am doing it with a new 7.1 igloo that I got from best buy for about $200 tax included. I bought a 3 tap system from kegconnection with a dual regulator and all stainless hardware and perlicks. That came to about $370, which is a lot BUT everyone recommends it, and if you're going to fucking do it, you might as well fucking do it right.

I probably spent close to $100 on materials for the collar, BUT this is my first real project and I didnt have a lot of tools/screws/misc stuff around to put that together so about $30 of that would go there.

I got a temp controller on amazon for $16 and an extention cord at home depot for ~$10, and have some leftover electrical accessories from my previous TC build so YMMV there.

I bought these dehumidifiers on amazon for $32

I bought two converted ball lock kegs from cornykeg.com for $100 with shipping and it was a breeze to clean them even thought they said they would be cleaned already.

I then got a 10lb steel air tank from adventures in homebrewing for $60 which I thought was a steal (steel hehe).

So this puts me close to $900. Which is $300 less than a very DIY-spirited blog post like this says it will cost. Sure I havent bought the last two kegs, but I then would still be $200 short of it.

There are some suggestions by the other guys in here that will save you money, and I'd say that my attempt is a little bit of combining both.

Hope I was some help!

u/[deleted] · 2 pointsr/legaladviceofftopic

https://www.amazon.com/Images-SI-Uranium-Ore/dp/B000796XXM

it looks like a strict liability law, so you need license (use or other one sec 13-?. the table at the end has permitted levels- i'd send them the amazon link with license app, but it looks likes the amazon sample is under the permitted limits and harmless(ish)... it looks like there's no restrictions on it in US, as its natural ore. so NK or ISIS could order a ton from zon and bezos would not commit treason (i think US decided quick that the ore is too costly/abundant to secure, and pivoted away from rocks to secure/ban trade in the refining technology... so it looks like the radioactive levels NZ permits are same as the natural ore, to get above that, it needs to be refined, which you can't do unless you're NK, CN, FR, UK, IR, USA, etc.

u/burnie_saunders · 1 pointr/microgrowery

the ph pen i use is a bluelab although ive used an oakton both are good. You'll want calibration solution for it as well.

other gadgets? I like to use a paint stirrer on a portable drill to mix ferts. a couple of quality spray bottles and a pump sprayer is nice to have on hand.

Treat for common pests systemically don't wait for that oh shit moment. I treat all my young healthy plants (before they go into bud) with a combination of OMRI (Organic Materials Review Institute) approved products: Azamax (neem extract for mites),Serenade (powdery mildew and mold) and Monterey Garden Spray (leaf miners and budworms). I use each of these at least once each, often if you wait to treat until you notice problems, it's too late to get optimum results.

u/skeletonmage · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

If that's the case might I recommend a fermentation chamber? It's not going to fit a conical fermenter but I can easily put 3, 6.5 gallon, carboys in there.

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/diy-fermentation-chamber.html

The Inkbird is usually on sale for about $30 on Amazon. Follow http://homebrewfinds.com to get one on the cheap!

I built mine using an STC1000, but I had to go to Radio Shack and grab a project box to make it look pretty.

For the heating unit, I purchased a $12 mini heater from Amazon and also installed a 12V fan that is on 24/7. Eventually I tossed a unit to help with moisture in there as well. I can't remember the name of it...found it on Homebrewfinds.

I'd run outside to take photos of my build but it's raining something hard right now ;(

u/insaneinthebrine · 7 pointsr/hotsaucerecipes

Sure, happy to

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups distilled or filtered water
  • 1.5 TBSP additive free salt
  • 1 lb. red jalapenos (or other hot red peppers of choice), halved, seeds & stems removed
  • 1 lb. Thai red chilies (or other hot red peppers of choice), stems removed (seeds optional)
  • 16 oz. sweet cherries (4 oz. in the ferment; 12 oz. added at blending), frozen or fresh (note that if using fresh, 16 oz. is the net weight AFTER the seeds are removed, so you’ll likely need more like 2 or more lbs.)
  • 2 tsp garlic powder (post-ferment) OR 6-8 cloves fresh garlic in ferment
  • 1 TBSP sugar (post-ferment)
  • Optional: splash of white vinegar (post-ferment)

    Directions:

    1.) Rinse and prepare the peppers as described above.

    2.) Add the cherries and Thai chilies to the jar, and garlic if using fresh, followed by the larger jalapeno pieces.

  1. Prepare the salt brine either by combining the salt in warm water and allowing it to cool, or shake them together vigorously in a tightly sealed jar. Then slowly add the brine to the ferment vessel.

    4.) About an inch before the jar is filled to the shoulder, add the weight, and continue pouring brine until all produce is submerged. It is important to have some distance from the top, as the water level will continue to rise as the produce releases moisture.

    5.) Apply the airlock lid and ferment for desired length. Suggested: Minimum one month. The pictures shown feature a nearly 3-month ferment.

    After the ferment:

    1.) Strain the brine from the peppers.

    2.) Transfer the peppers to the blender, add 1/2 cup of the reserved brine, 12oz. thawed frozen cherries, sugar, and garlic powder (unless fresh cloves were used in ferment). Blend on high for a few minutes. If you prefer a thinner sauce, add additional brine, blend, continuing to add brine and blend until desired consistency is achieved.

    3.) You may now store the sauce raw in the refrigerator, or go on to cook and/or pasteurize it.

    Raw sauce: This method preserves the probiotic bacteria in your ferment. If you can test the pH and confirm it is 3.2 or below, there will be no issues. If the pH is above this level, it is possible the added sugar and cherries can restart the ferment, which can create excessive pressure in the storage container. It is not suitable for mailing or room temperature storage. If you are close to 3.2, you may add vinegar until the correct pH is achieved. If not, refrigerator storage is an acceptable method, but the container should be monitored and the cap periodically loosened to release potential pressure build-up.

    Cooked sauce: Transfer the sauce to a medium saucepan, bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low, simmering covered for around 20 minutes. You may then opt to blend the sauce further in the blender for several minutes while hot, which will create a very smooth, easily flowing sauce. You can add a splash of vinegar for flavor and to further reduce pH as well. To transfer to 5 oz. woozy bottles, use a bottling funnel.
u/DBDude · 1 pointr/reloading

For calipers I'm not sure about going with gun brand name since the price tends to go up just because gunz. This thing is probably just as good as your Frankford, but much less money. It's $17 and pretty much the same thing as the Hornady that goes for $27. Just look for general calipers that have the best reviews and you're bound to get a better deal than that one. Definitely look to see if they maintain zero for a long time, since you don't want it to be off several thousandths by the time you've measured your COL on your 50th bullet of 100.

u/reallyzen · 1 pointr/techtheatre

I have a a backpack for LD (various MIDI interfaces, USB-DMX dongle, laptops, AA Maglite) or a Bum bag for more hands-on electrics (where I say Knippex, Lindstrom, Fluke. And Maglite.). And a toolbox with the all important hammer (nicknamed "sweetness"), big-ass wrenches and so on.

I try not to forget this, ever.

Also a Wera of sort, but damn this one is elegant, I wasn't aware of it.

That thingy when used responsibly is a huge help, but do NOT use it as a safety controller.

Speaking of which, I tend to get people mad by insisting on using this before starting actual work. 400mA diff NOT working anyone? It happens.

Looking at how things are organised here, I couldn't get it in one bag; long jobs end up filling my car actually: Gels, and spares, and backups, and adapters, and an actual toolbox... And the cordless drill... when I do festivals or street theatre or such, my car end up the Tool-chest, you can't possibly carry it all while on the move, but you can organise your trunk so that everything comes easily at hand.

u/rcm_rx7 · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

Can I recommend a different thermostat? I think you would be much better off with an STC-1000, with a probe that can be immersed in the beer with a thermowell, or stuck on the side of a carboy/bucket. They are really cheap, and easy to wire. It needs 120v to power the unit, and then you can switch the input voltage for the fan with the built in relays.

If you ever wanted to add a heater it would be easy too.

The [Inkbird](https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00OXPE8U6/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_spS8ub02194G2
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00OXPE8U6/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_spS8ub02194G2) seems to be a pretty great option that has F instead of C

u/thegreybush · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

Realistically, the only thing that you need to create a keezer is temperature control, and even that is optional depending on what your freezer is capable of.

The key to making a freezer into a keezer is getting the temperature right. The easy way is to add temp control, something like an Inkbird ITC-308 is relatively inexpensive and is plug-n-play. These max out at somewhere around 10 amps, so there is an upper limit on freezer size because larger freezers have larger amp draws during the compressor startup. I have run two different ~6-cuft chest freezers off an ITC-308 and they both worked fine. Another option is to locate the coarse adjustment setting on the freezer's own thermostat and adjust it until you can maintain beer fridge temps. I have successfully done this as well.

As for the collar, Most chest freezers are tall enough for a keg to stand up on the floor without a collar. In-fact, you'll find many keezers that use towers mounted to the top of the lid rather than collars for mounting taps. If you are willing to serve out of a picnic tap, you don't even need a tower. I ran a keezer with picnic taps for almost a year because it allowed me to very quickly and easily convert it back to a fermentation chamber. Another added benefit to not adding a collar is not having to lift the keg as far to get it in.

u/clarkent0000 · 1 pointr/askanelectrician

oh my goodness!!! what a great little gadget. I had no idea something like this even exists. I checked Amazon Canada but there are so many of these, and the instruction videos shows them sticking it into the hole of the wall plug. Yeah of course it has electricity inside. Will it work on any surface like a lets say a metal countertop that is "live" for whatever reasons???

I am going to buy the one a little expensive because it seems to be a reliable brand as per the reviews. Please let me know what you think and tell me if it will work on any conducting surfaces??

https://www.amazon.ca/Fluke-1AC-A1-II-Volt-Alert-Non-Contact-Voltage/dp/B000EJ332O/ref=sr_1_5?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1518252273&sr=1-5&keywords=non+contact+voltage+tester

How about that one please??

u/IIIBlackhartIII · 23 pointsr/changemyview

I'd like to point out that you can, in fact, buy uranium ore as an individual- there's even uranium ore on Amazon.

What I think you're talking about is refined uranium-235, the kind which is used in the creation of atomic weaponry. Even supposing that you're not using it to attempt to create a bomb- and you are indeed hoping to use the product for research or development on medical or other purposes, why should individuals be allowed to obtain such a volatile material? There's the dangers of radiation poisoning, of the creation of weapons, etc... if you're truly hoping to use the uranium for research purposes, why wouldn't you go through an established university, institute, or lab? This way we make sure that qualified professionals with the equipment and know-how to make sure that it is handled safely, and for genuinely useful purposes, are the ones with access to it. And there's accountability to make sure it doesn't just end up in the hands of a bomber.

It's like if someone wanted to obtain samples of smallpox for research purposes- why would we trust just anyone and run the risk of it being mishandled, when there are established procedures and institutes to make sure it is properly contained?

u/nonothing · 5 pointsr/beerporn

I unfortunately don't have all the photos I took of the build. Thankfully google saved a few.

The fridge was delivered and I ripped all the shelves out.

I cut a little hole in the bottom of the fridge (the bottom 6" are empty space for the compressor, so this was just thin plastic) and wired up an ITC-1000. The original freezer controls only go 10F max. I also removed the defrost timer so this fridge is on manual defrost now, though I've had no freezing problems in well over a year. The fan is now on 24/7 instead of coming on with...the defrost? I cant remember how it originally turned on. You're playing with electricity here, be smart and safe and dont start a fire or die, or have a professional do it.

The back panel in the above picture stayed on, RIGHT behind it is about 3" of space for the evap and fan. Right under the evap I drilled 3 holes. 1 for the main CO2 line, 1 for the Nitro line, 1 small one for the fridge temp sensor. Eventually another one for the 5v for the arduino. They all came up through the little slit and had grommets for the sheet metal. They shouldn't be moving around, but the last thing I want is a cut line.

I bought a 36"x5" drip tray without a drain and 3d printed 3 brackets for mounting. Since it doesnt have a drip tray I want it to be mobile. The brackets have magnets in them so it can easily be taken off the fridge door and cleaned. I really didnt want to put any holes in the door except the taps.

I cut the shelves off the door but left most of the skin. The plastic helps seal the door seal AND it's holding in the plywood I used to replace the door. I have no idea the thickness of the plywood anymore but I did have to sand down a good 1/8" where the taps are so they'd fit. Any longer shanks and I'd be poking kegs, any shorter shanks and I'd be too short and need smaller plywood.

You can see above how the CO2 is routed and the temp sensor right in the middle of the fridge.

The top distributor goes to the top shelf, middle splits to both sides, the bottom goes to the bottom shelf. I honestly could have gotten away with 2 different pressures. I really don't change off serving pressure except for quick carbing a beer. Most of the beers I brew end up around the same carbonation level. Maybe when I need something crazy high/low carbed I'll be excited.

That's also the best photo I have of the finished product before it got a bit more messy like now. I have some 3D printed brackets that hold the lines in place on the side of the fridge.

I did have an issue with the fridge leaking all of its damn r134a out. There was a small leak by the evap. A bit late in the build for a replacement. Found the leak and JB Welded it shut. It was too close to the wall to braze and JB Weld has held for over a year now. Luckily I had done a car AC before and had the manifold gauge, vacuum pump, and fittings. I learned to braze on the quick connect, pulled vacuum, hit it with nitrogen to ensure there were no leaks (though it held vacuum as well), pulled another vacuum and filled her to spec with r134a. Been working like a charm ever since.

There is a raspberry pi running RaspberryPints with some cheap ass flow meters. The only changes I made were how many pulses on the meters meant a pint. I've been fiddling with it ever since. I'm sometimes off by a handful of pints on my kegs. Enough to get me close, but I'd like to dial it in without spending $60 on each freaking meter. How much beer is left in my keg is not a $60 problem to me.

u/ThrownAwayMosin · 3 pointsr/ak47

> neither extreme or violent in a method to accelerate the projectile rapidly.


......Thats why guns never explode because smokeless gently pushes the rounds down the barrel with with light and gentle pressure. Oh I get it now./s

You are arguing semantics with someone who doesn't give a fuck. Try to change your walls mind and you might have better luck. And hey dumb ass what do hemorrhoids feel like? oh that's right they feel like butthurt. Since I was never a dick to you till after you called me one, you must have hemorrhoids, because you were pretty butt hurt over a mild joke, that was more in agreement with you while making fun of I.O., RAs,C39 owners, yet you took it personally. Most likely because you were already in butthurt due to the hemorrhoids, Hence why I recommended it for you. Why you think my pussy has a yeast infection Idk, it's not like you can see me sitting here scratching at this itchy thing, But I promise it's not from you, you are no where near sweet enough.

And now the downvotes are hurting your feefees? Don't worry I'll have a talk with them.

Guy stop downvoting him. He obviously can't handle the downvotes and needs a safepace where he can hide from all the libtard cucks who aren't even here yet he felt the need to bring that up.

Also might want to double check those numbers, Unless these are 300g containers. But surely you know what you're talking about and didn't throw up a random thing you read once.

u/SuperSaiyanBJJ · 2 pointsr/livesound

Hello, reddit,

I think I can break a world record for the... wait for it... loudest pop of the lips. I can create an extremely loud pop with my lips, but I'm sure I need a calibrated, official way to measure that. I don't really know much about the technology of audio, so here's where I ended up. Would a cheap decibel meter record a short instance of sound like that, or would I need something else?

Would a product like THIS help to get the WR for loudest pop of the lips: https://www.amazon.com/BAFX-Products%C3%82-Decibel-Reader-Battery/dp/B00ECCZWWI

Thanks, sound people.

u/calgarytab · 4 pointsr/Homebrewing

Not sure about shipping with Canada Post lately (maybe don't buy date sensitive products if shipping with Canada Post) but here's a short breakdown for Canada deals:

https://www.ontariobeerkegs.com/Articles.asp?ID=323 Lots of stuff on sale (free shipping over $100)

https://brewhq.ca/ 20% off equipment (free shipping over $75)

https://www.noblegrape.ca/collections/equipment/ 20% off equipment with coupon code: HAPPYMONDAY

https://www.hopdawgs.ca/ 10% off $100 or 15% off $250

https://www.everwoodavebrewshop.com/ 20% off Coupon Code: Everwood

https://torontobrewing.ca/collections/black-friday-sale Lots of stuff on sale

https://www.amazon.ca/Inkbird-Itc-308-Temperature-Controller-Thermostat/dp/B011296704 Apply $10 Coupon

https://goldsteam.com/ No specific BF sale but everyday low prices and didn't want to leave them out of the party

https://www.topps-hops.ca/collections/t90-pellets Same with Topps, always good pricing

https://www.plaato.io/plaato-airlock-bf Worth noting $99 (USD?) fun tool with free shipping worldwide

Don't forget to support your local Homebrew shop as well!

u/thinman · 2 pointsr/headphones

I was thinking of getting one of these http://amzn.com/B00ECCZWWI and doing my best to seal the headphone cups around it and figure out what a safe listening volume sounds like while using something like this as a guide http://www.dangerousdecibels.org/education/information-center/decibel-exposure-time-guidelines/

I am cautious about my hearing at times because I have 15-30% hearing loss in my left year (varies with frequency) and it was quite debilitating when it first happened. I can tilt the audio balance in my headphones to compensate somewhat but it's not even close to the same fidelity as my good ear. 15-30% doesn't sound like much but it's roughly the equivalent of putting a finger in your ear, go ahead try it, see what it's like to be me, lol. The most disturbing thing for me is that I can no longer determine the source of a sound around me. Since the hearing is uneven I can no longer unconsciously distinguish which ear is receiving a direct signal and which is receiving a delayed/decayed reflection and therefore have no idea what direction to look most of the time.

Best ear health tip I ever received was from my ear doctor, he recommended peroxide in the ear canal until it stops bubbling followed by white vinegar whenever my ears are feeling stuffy or a little sore to keep the ears clean and free from infection. I wish he had told me that 20 years ago before my eardrum got all scarred up from infections and caused the hearing loss.

u/smsjohnson · 2 pointsr/pics

I bought mine in Germany, but they have the same one on amazon.com.

http://amzn.com/B00OXPE8U6

There are quite a few with different brand names, but they are all made by the same company, mine was branded 'Tinxi'.

For the plug and connection [to crockpot] I just cut an extension cable in half and attached either end to the relevant terminals.

And I use a pump a little similar to this: http://amzn.com/B00NPJECXO.

The crock pot is only 200W so it takes a while to get to temperature, but you can use something more powerful like a rice cooker or start with hotter water.

It's great for making yoghurt in jars too.

Just need a better vacuum sealer, any suggestions?

u/wQuestionAsker · 2 pointsr/cannabiscultivation

Apera Instruments makes very very good ph pens. I’ve had mine for many months and I’ve calibrated it 2 times. I didn’t even need to calibrate it the 2nd time. I just wanted to see if it was off after a couple months, but it was still good! It’s still correctly calibrated right now, which has been another couple months since I did it last

I know some people use the cheap 15-20$ Orange and yellow ones amazon has with some pretty good results. I would personally spend a tad bit more and get one from Apera if you can.

Here’s the one I have: Apera ph20

u/WesbroBaptstBarNGril · 33 pointsr/reloading

He needs, yes. The Lee Challenger kit is around $99 on Amazon, and that has everything he'll need to get started except for: Bullets, Primers, Powder and Brass and DIES for 7.62x54r (another $30-$40)

Now, he'll want a digital scale, a case trimmer, and a tumbler to get his brass clean and pretty. That all can be added on, and most likely, be purchased in addition to the press kit for about $200.

Here's a list of things he'll want:

Lee Challenger Reloading Kit
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B003ISVWC6/ref=yo_ii_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Hornady Reloading Manual (So he doesn’t blow himself up)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01MAUZ71V/ref=yo_ii_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Calipers (So he doesn’t blow his gun up)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000GSLKIW/ref=yo_ii_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1

7.62x54r Reloading Dies
https://www.amazon.com/Lee-Precision-7-62X54R-Pacesetter-Dies/dp/B00162UGUK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1511562718&sr=8-1&keywords=7.62x54r+dies

Frankford Arsenal Quick-n-EZ Case Tumbler (To make clean-shiny brass)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001MYGLJC/ref=yo_ii_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Case Tumbling Media
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000OQRGF2/ref=yo_ii_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1

RCBS Universal Case Loading Block
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0013RA5DQ/ref=yo_ii_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Hornady One-Shot Case Lube https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0001NA29U/ref=yo_ii_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Guardians of the Galaxy Soundtrack (Because listening to good music scientifically makes better bullets)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00LICGSFU/ref=yo_ii_img?ie=UTF8

u/scotch_scotch-scotch · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

If you can splice a few wires yourself, here is a cheaper option for temp control. You would still need to buy a couple of extension cords, and a heating element (I use a light bulb in a paint can). Set up a search alert on Craigslist for a cheap fridge or chest freezer and you are in business. If you are looking to go super cheap, your best bet is to submerge your carboy about 3/4 of the way in water, add ice, and wrap a towel around the top of the carboy to encourage evaporation. You really have to stay on top of the ice though.

u/8492_berkut · 1 pointr/reloading

Definitely get yourself a set of calipers. Even low-cost units can do you quite a bit of good as long as you don't expect too much out of them. Something like these can get you where you need to go.

With bipods, there's definitely some technique to be learned with them. You should remember to load the bipod while shooting. This article should help you understand. Also, cruise around on that site as it has an absolute wealth of information on it.

It sounds as wind didn't have much of an effect, so that's good. Keep it in mind, though, to shoot in a similar condition. If the wind is blowing when you start shooting, try not to shoot during a lull in the wind, and vice-versa.

Regarding your sizing die, try to adjust it where you have a good amount of contact. You should feel it hit the shellholder when you're working through the upstroke. It's hard to explain, kinda like when you know when a bolt is snug enough via the good old German spec - gudentite. ;)

u/lunaticfringe80 · 1 pointr/microgrowery

As long as you don't get lazy and start cutting corners, or experimenting too much before you're ready, you'll see steady improvement.

IMO, stick to the directions and LST for a couple grows until you've got it down to where you really aren't having to look up each step and you aren't making any little mistakes causing the plants stress. Then try some HST like Super Cropping to increase your yield even more.

If you plan on continuing to grow, my best advice is to invest in a good pH meter like this one. and measure the pH of your runoff so you know if your soil pH is drifting and compensate on your next watering by going up or down by .2 or so. Keep it between 6.3 and 6.8. Beware of cheap pH meters, they need to be recalibrated constantly to be even remotely reliable.

u/8bitSkin · 1 pointr/ballpython

I see a lot of people mentioning the Hydrofarm but I gotta say, if you want the most bang for your buck, pick up one of these. I have these for my rack and it is great, works like a champ. And it's only $16!

u/not_meeeee · 1 pointr/DeskCorners

Totally agree! I like the way you think! ;) Is your floor controller down yet? I bet a nice dark mahogany phanalic loop would look amazing with an ice top. You would probably have a lot of birds trying to get close to it if you use a bit of this.

u/abjectCitizen · 2 pointsr/microgrowery

I am still a newb on my first grow, so please take this as potentially wrong. Also, if anyone sees a problem, let me know. I'm trying to do my best.

I started in a tent but I built a 6'x8' grow room. I posted it to this sub a while back. Here is the album: http://imgur.com/a/Gshra

I upgraded to COB LEDs. They can pull 500 watts (40 watts per sqft) They are currently at 85% (34 watts per sq ft). The plan is to slowly ramp them up to 100% the first few week of flower. (I'm currently in the first week of flower). Here the album on that build: http://imgur.com/a/iWYiP

I'm in a basement where I can draw a large volume of cool air into the room. It becomes a problem during lights out because it gets too cold. I have on of those oil filled radiator heaters hooked up to a thermostat-controlled outlet:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01KEYDNKK

When it hits 69F, it kicks on until it gets up to 79F then it shuts off.

To control the upper end of the temperature, I use my fan and this speed controller.

fan:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B018WM0EMQ

speed controller:

http://www.hyper-fans.com/shop/bybrand/hyper-fan/hyper-fan-temperature-speed-controller

I haven't had any need to run an A/C unit but I could plug one into the "cooling" side of that temperature-controlled outlet.

The humidity in the room is rather high right now (50-60%). It seems to go up when I water. I'm on the fence if I should get a dehumidifier or just let it ride. If I do get one, that will have to have a humidity I can set.

Also, I put my original grow tent in grow room to veg some clones. I covered up all the passive air vents and taped them closed with gorilla tape. Then, I used flexible ducting to make an exhaust tube and intake tube. Using the flexible tubing, I can make light traps. I put 4 CFLs in there on a 18/6 timer. I do have an exhaust fan in the tent. It does not, however, need a carbon filter as the whole room is filtered. I'm not sure how a veg tent in a flower room is going to work out, but I am going to find out. :)

Anyway, I'm a newb on my first grow. That is, however, how I am currently growing weed.

u/SignedJannis · 1 pointr/ballpython

Thankyou so much for the help. Yes I care about animals and she just doesn't look that happy. The new owner is a great person, but doesn't possess either the financial means nor "technical desire" to take care of the somewhat precise environmental needs.


Yes tank is glass, with a "wire frame" top. I am handy with carpentry, so am thinking of making a decent wooden lid for the cabinet, with air vents routed in to it.


So for a glass tank, should I go for a UTH and a ceramic lamp for ambient temperature? Would I need two thermostats? e.g would two of these suffice: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015E2UFGM/

u/BrewsterC · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

More of an electrical engineering question, but I feel like you guys would provide me with a better answer.

After doing a lot of research the past week, I found many guides on how to assemble a Freezer-Chest-Fermenter. I am using this temperature controller, and I just want to make sure I set it up correctly.

From what I can understand (PLEASE CORRECT ME IF IM WRONG), this tool lets me set a temperature and a range, and will heat or cool if necessary to reach that destination temperature.

If that's the case, what my plan is, is to plug the Chest Freezer into the "Cooling" out, and a small space heater into the "Heating" outlet.

So my two questions... Is my idea on how this works correct? And would my plan work? Or should I get something other than a space heater?

u/QuipA · 1 pointr/headphones

As you said, loudness not only depends on the amp and headphone pairing, but also the individual track gain. It is safe to say that anything below the 12 o'clock position is safe for prolonged listening.

If you really need a rough estimate of how loud you are listening you will have to buy a dB meter and place it between the earcups while playing music