Reddit mentions: The best floor fans

We found 80 Reddit comments discussing the best floor fans. We ran sentiment analysis on each of these comments to determine how redditors feel about different products. We found 38 products and ranked them based on the amount of positive reactions they received. Here are the top 20.

🎓 Reddit experts on floor fans

The comments and opinions expressed on this page are written exclusively by redditors. To provide you with the most relevant data, we sourced opinions from the most knowledgeable Reddit users based the total number of upvotes and downvotes received across comments on subreddits where floor fans are discussed. For your reference and for the sake of transparency, here are the specialists whose opinions mattered the most in our ranking.
Total score: 54
Number of comments: 2
Relevant subreddits: 1
Total score: 16
Number of comments: 6
Relevant subreddits: 1
Total score: 8
Number of comments: 4
Relevant subreddits: 1
Total score: 5
Number of comments: 3
Relevant subreddits: 2
Total score: 4
Number of comments: 2
Relevant subreddits: 1
Total score: 4
Number of comments: 2
Relevant subreddits: 1
Total score: 3
Number of comments: 2
Relevant subreddits: 2
Total score: 2
Number of comments: 2
Relevant subreddits: 1
Total score: 2
Number of comments: 2
Relevant subreddits: 1
Total score: 2
Number of comments: 1
Relevant subreddits: 1

idea-bulb Interested in what Redditors like? Check out our Shuffle feature

Shuffle: random products popular on Reddit

Top Reddit comments about Floor Fans:

u/nudelete · 2 pointsr/undelete

>I have seen a few posts about people who don't have flood insurance, or any insurance on this subreddit (I hope its appropriate to post here) and I wanted to help you help yourself prepping to go back in to your home. I work remodeling homes, and commercial buildings and have a few tips for when you go back in your house to save a few thousand dollars.
>
>First thing is first, you need to expect total losses on a couple items; carpet and padding is gone, 100% don't bother keeping it. Drywall and plaster that have been submerged are also toast. Furniture may be salvageable, but if it has cloth or padding, assume its a loss. If it isn't REALLY expensive (custom, antique, or all sealed wood) its probably done for. These 3 things can cause health issues if not taken care of immediately. For your families sake, please don't hesitate to throw them away. Its all replaceable, your health is not.
>
>I'll preface this with the fact that I have never worked with FEMA, but only insurance companies. My knowledge and experience comes from working with them and if you have more information than I do, please add.
>
>
>
>
>
>How to prep your house:
>
>The VERY FIRST thing you do, is go to your main breaker panel, and make sure the electricity is shut off in the room you will be working. The odds of you getting shocked are negligable, but Murphy is always lurking. Once you have the breaker switched to the off position of that room you can begin the demo process.
>
>Unscrew the plates on the electrical outlets, and cable jacks. This will take a flat head screwdriver. Save these in a plastic ziplock bag to put back on later.
>
>If you have baseboard, and want to try to keep it (personally I'd just chuck it myself usually) you will need a razor knife. You will need one anyways so if you don't have one, purchase one. I'd recommend this one off amazon, but you can find simple razors for a couple bucks. The problem with cheeps, is they break easy, and you'll need the knife for your carpet too. Anyways, cut where the baseboard meets the wall, as there will be a paint layer and/or caulking there to seal it. Then use the flat head to pry the baseboard back. If you are trying to salvage the baseboard, be gentle and take your time. If you aren't trying to salvage it, bust it up and take out some anger on it.
>
>Next is your drywall. Here is a drywall saw I recommend. Go 6-8 inches above the waterline and punch it through the drywall (you can use your hand, but a hammer doesn't hurt as much) and cut it all. Rip out everything below your cut and throw it away. Then pull out any insulation in the walls, as they are soaked and compromised as well. This will help prevent mold growing in the walls.
>
>Leave any and all plumbing or electrical work exactly how it is.
>
>Next comes carpet. The carpet is only held on by tack strips (thin wooden pieces, with little nails in them) along the edges. Pull up the edges and the rest comes easy. Since the carpet is soaked, its going to be extremely heavy. This is why I would purchase the better razor knife, and cut the carpet in to pieces to haul it outside. By leaving the carpet until last, this will help your clean up from the dry wall, baseboard, and insulation immensely. The padding underneath will usually be stapled, or glued down, just rip it out.
>
>Turn the breakers back on, and put some fans in there if you have them. The more air movement the better. Obviously a lot of people won't be able to afford industrial style fans, but here is one for 40 bucks. If you can spare it, it will make a huge difference. The bigger the better, if you have the cash.
>
>I would leave cabinets where they are, and dry them out as quickly as possible. They will probably be replaced too, but once they are dry they pose no health risk, and you will probably still be using them to hold stuff until a contractor can replace them.
>
>These few things will save you thousand of dollars later on, and more importantly will keep your chances of being sick way down. In the insurance world(again I've never worked with FEMA), you get money for demolition, so you can pocket a good chunk of that, if not all of it depending on the contractors needs, and scope of work.
>
>I'd recommend getting a multi-tool as well, but they aren't necessary. They are just helpful. Here is what I use.
>
>I wish I could be there to help everyone out, and I hope this helps in some way. I'm praying for you all / sending good vibes and cash to you, but I hope this helps you out even more. Good luck, and if there is anything I can do, please don't hesitate to contact me.

u/FrontpageWatch · 1 pointr/longtail

>I have seen a few posts about people who don't have flood insurance, or any insurance on this subreddit (I hope its appropriate to post here) and I wanted to help you help yourself prepping to go back in to your home. I work remodeling homes, and commercial buildings and have a few tips for when you go back in your house to save a few thousand dollars.
>
>First thing is first, you need to expect total losses on a couple items; carpet and padding is gone, 100% don't bother keeping it. Drywall and plaster that have been submerged are also toast. Furniture may be salvageable, but if it has cloth or padding, assume its a loss. If it isn't REALLY expensive (custom, antique, or all sealed wood) its probably done for. These 3 things can cause health issues if not taken care of immediately. For your families sake, please don't hesitate to throw them away. Its all replaceable, your health is not.
>
>I'll preface this with the fact that I have never worked with FEMA, but only insurance companies. My knowledge and experience comes from working with them and if you have more information than I do, please add.
>
>
>
>
>
>How to prep your house:
>
>The VERY FIRST thing you do, is go to your main breaker panel, and make sure the electricity is shut off in the room you will be working. The odds of you getting shocked are negligable, but Murphy is always lurking. Once you have the breaker switched to the off position of that room you can begin the demo process.
>
>Unscrew the plates on the electrical outlets, and cable jacks. This will take a flat head screwdriver. Save these in a plastic ziplock bag to put back on later.
>
>If you have baseboard, and want to try to keep it (personally I'd just chuck it myself usually) you will need a razor knife. You will need one anyways so if you don't have one, purchase one. I'd recommend this one off amazon, but you can find simple razors for a couple bucks. The problem with cheeps, is they break easy, and you'll need the knife for your carpet too. Anyways, cut where the baseboard meets the wall, as there will be a paint layer and/or caulking there to seal it. Then use the flat head to pry the baseboard back. If you are trying to salvage the baseboard, be gentle and take your time. If you aren't trying to salvage it, bust it up and take out some anger on it.
>
>Next is your drywall. Here is a drywall saw I recommend. Go 6-8 inches above the waterline and punch it through the drywall (you can use your hand, but a hammer doesn't hurt as much) and cut it all. Rip out everything below your cut and throw it away. Then pull out any insulation in the walls, as they are soaked and compromised as well. This will help prevent mold growing in the walls.
>
>Leave any and all plumbing or electrical work exactly how it is.
>
>Next comes carpet. The carpet is only held on by tack strips (thin wooden pieces, with little nails in them) along the edges. Pull up the edges and the rest comes easy. Since the carpet is soaked, its going to be extremely heavy. This is why I would purchase the better razor knife, and cut the carpet in to pieces to haul it outside. By leaving the carpet until last, this will help your clean up from the dry wall, baseboard, and insulation immensely. The padding underneath will usually be stapled, or glued down, just rip it out.
>
>Turn the breakers back on, and put some fans in there if you have them. The more air movement the better. Obviously a lot of people won't be able to afford industrial style fans, but here is one for 40 bucks. If you can spare it, it will make a huge difference. The bigger the better, if you have the cash.
>
>I would leave cabinets where they are, and dry them out as quickly as possible. They will probably be replaced too, but once they are dry they pose no health risk, and you will probably still be using them to hold stuff until a contractor can replace them.
>
>These few things will save you thousand of dollars later on, and more importantly will keep your chances of being sick way down. In the insurance world(again I've never worked with FEMA), you get money for demolition, so you can pocket a good chunk of that, if not all of it depending on the contractors needs, and scope of work.
>
>I'd recommend getting a multi-tool as well, but they aren't necessary. They are just helpful. Here is what I use.
>
>I wish I could be there to help everyone out, and I hope this helps in some way. I'm praying for you all / sending good vibes and cash to you, but I hope this helps you out even more. Good luck, and if there is anything I can do, please don't hesitate to contact me.

u/underpopular · 1 pointr/underpopular

>I have seen a few posts about people who don't have flood insurance, or any insurance on this subreddit (I hope its appropriate to post here) and I wanted to help you help yourself prepping to go back in to your home. I work remodeling homes, and commercial buildings and have a few tips for when you go back in your house to save a few thousand dollars.
>
>First thing is first, you need to expect total losses on a couple items; carpet and padding is gone, 100% don't bother keeping it. Drywall and plaster that have been submerged are also toast. Furniture may be salvageable, but if it has cloth or padding, assume its a loss. If it isn't REALLY expensive (custom, antique, or all sealed wood) its probably done for. These 3 things can cause health issues if not taken care of immediately. For your families sake, please don't hesitate to throw them away. Its all replaceable, your health is not.
>
>I'll preface this with the fact that I have never worked with FEMA, but only insurance companies. My knowledge and experience comes from working with them and if you have more information than I do, please add.
>
>
>
>
>
>How to prep your house:
>
>The VERY FIRST thing you do, is go to your main breaker panel, and make sure the electricity is shut off in the room you will be working. The odds of you getting shocked are negligable, but Murphy is always lurking. Once you have the breaker switched to the off position of that room you can begin the demo process.
>
>Unscrew the plates on the electrical outlets, and cable jacks. This will take a flat head screwdriver. Save these in a plastic ziplock bag to put back on later.
>
>If you have baseboard, and want to try to keep it (personally I'd just chuck it myself usually) you will need a razor knife. You will need one anyways so if you don't have one, purchase one. I'd recommend this one off amazon, but you can find simple razors for a couple bucks. The problem with cheeps, is they break easy, and you'll need the knife for your carpet too. Anyways, cut where the baseboard meets the wall, as there will be a paint layer and/or caulking there to seal it. Then use the flat head to pry the baseboard back. If you are trying to salvage the baseboard, be gentle and take your time. If you aren't trying to salvage it, bust it up and take out some anger on it.
>
>Next is your drywall. Here is a drywall saw I recommend. Go 6-8 inches above the waterline and punch it through the drywall (you can use your hand, but a hammer doesn't hurt as much) and cut it all. Rip out everything below your cut and throw it away. Then pull out any insulation in the walls, as they are soaked and compromised as well. This will help prevent mold growing in the walls.
>
>Leave any and all plumbing or electrical work exactly how it is.
>
>Next comes carpet. The carpet is only held on by tack strips (thin wooden pieces, with little nails in them) along the edges. Pull up the edges and the rest comes easy. Since the carpet is soaked, its going to be extremely heavy. This is why I would purchase the better razor knife, and cut the carpet in to pieces to haul it outside. By leaving the carpet until last, this will help your clean up from the dry wall, baseboard, and insulation immensely. The padding underneath will usually be stapled, or glued down, just rip it out.
>
>Turn the breakers back on, and put some fans in there if you have them. The more air movement the better. Obviously a lot of people won't be able to afford industrial style fans, but here is one for 40 bucks. If you can spare it, it will make a huge difference. The bigger the better, if you have the cash.
>
>I would leave cabinets where they are, and dry them out as quickly as possible. They will probably be replaced too, but once they are dry they pose no health risk, and you will probably still be using them to hold stuff until a contractor can replace them.
>
>These few things will save you thousand of dollars later on, and more importantly will keep your chances of being sick way down. In the insurance world(again I've never worked with FEMA), you get money for demolition, so you can pocket a good chunk of that, if not all of it depending on the contractors needs, and scope of work.
>
>I'd recommend getting a multi-tool as well, but they aren't necessary. They are just helpful. Here is what I use.
>
>I wish I could be there to help everyone out, and I hope this helps in some way. I'm praying for you all / sending good vibes and cash to you, but I hope this helps you out even more. Good luck, and if there is anything I can do, please don't hesitate to contact me.

u/s0briquet · 3 pointsr/BBQ

Alright...
Ol' Florida boy here, so I'm aware of the pain.

First, you need a good offset umbrella. Get the offset, so that the pole isn't in the middle of everything. Deck chairs are up to you. Everyone has their own comfort level for chairs.

I recommend a big ass fan that you can put far away, and that can move air across your whole area. If you're so inclined, a fan mist kit can help a lot too. This may or may not be convenient (or necessary) for you, depending on your setup.

I'm an outdoorsy kinda guy, and I'd rather hang out outside all day than sit inside. As such, I recommend Adidas Climacool Shirts. They make other styles than the golf/polo shirt type, but the fabric is amazing in the heat.

Keeping with the staying outdoors all day theme, I always recommend a good hat to keep you cool. Hats are, of course, a personal preference, but anything with a nice wide brim, and plenty of ventilation is great.

Now, a cooler isn't necessarily required, however, if you're the cooler type, then you can't go wrong with a stainless steel patio cooler. If that's a little outside your budget, maybe go for a plastic one. Those Marine Ultra ones can hold ice for days without a problem.

If you've got the cooler, but you're more of a mini keg kinda guy, you could get a jockey box kit to slap up in a cooler. If you had a decent sized cooler, then you could still keep some sodas or water in there.

Now, I don't know about you, but when I'm chillaxin' out by the bbq, I like to get down with some tunes. You can get some outdoor radio setups for pretty cheap. We always managed to hide speakers under the roof overhang, and this seems geared towards it right out of the box.

Now, I'm not much of a TV guy, but if you're hanging out with the friends and family, especially in the autumn, someone's gonna demand to watch the football game. I have a crappy little 32" TV that I like to pull out and connect to the stereo, so we can put the game(s) on. Get one you like. That was just the first one I found for under $200. The one I've got is an older model from Sharp, and has a matte finish on the screen, so the viewing angle is very wide, and it's pretty easy to see, so long as there's a little shade over it. Also, $200 isn't a critical loss of cash if it gets rained on. Though in the 5 or so years I've been pulling the TV, it has never gotten wet enough to be a problem. (It rains nearly every afternoon during the summer where I'm from in FL).

Those are just some ideas, and not a comprehensive list. I didn't mention anything about mosquito control, as I don't think I've ever heard anyone refer to Texas as "swampy".

u/mrandyclark · 3 pointsr/pelotoncycle

I was just thinking about posting something about this. Would love to see setups and get tips for the best experience.

I have a pic on my Instagram - @peloton_clarkie. I’ll take some more and upload when I get home.

We turned our second bedroom into a spin studio of sorts. We have two bikes separated by a yoga mat for post ride stretching.

Mats are a huge win. You can either get the Peloton mat, an off brand mat from Amazon, or go to a carpet/flooring store and get a remnant of some garage flooring or otherwise. At most you’ll spend $60, but sweat clean up and saving the floor is absolutely worth it.

I am going to hang some hooks by the door for headbands, towels, hr monitors, etc. Right now we hang our gear on the handlebars, which isn’t ideal since you have to move a bunch of stuff before a spin. I also want to find a place to put a bench that we can store shoes / get ready. Name of the game is less barriers to working out...

Fan is a major bonus as well. I have the plus of being next to a window so we put a box fan there when spinning. Another upgrade would be to get fans that are mounted on the wall. I’ve seen those on amazon for $60 or so.

I had a major issue with Bluetooth headphones and getting them synced with the video, which ultimately pushed me to buy a better audio system. I have both bikes running into a Sony receiver, which powers two bookshelf speakers and Bluetooth 4.1 to my headphones. I highly recommend upgrading the speakers on the bike if you can. It’s made the experience infinitely better to have in sync, exceptional sound.

u/ddesla2 · 5 pointsr/EtherMining

A couple of things: Firstly, those cards running at 70-85C really is fine. They are well within adequate operating range and can run at those temperatures 24/7 for years without any problems. Matter of fact, the fans on your cards will die and give out before the cards will at those temps. Now, all that said, it is obviously in your best interest to lower the temps as they will have better rates the cooler they are and you will see better performance from ancillary hardware as well.

Next, your enclosure set up is wrong. You definitely want air flow through your shed like it were a big PC case. The a/c units are a waste of money. Cooling hot ass hardware like this in a hot ass geographical location needs to come from REMOVING HEAT, not INTRODUCING COLD AIR. It is significantly easier and more efficient to use thermodynamics to your advantage and remove heat from an enclosure than it is to cool it down with cold air. It seems a little counter intuitive, I know, but trust me. All of this I am telling you is from a lot of experience. What I recommend is setting up your airflow from the bottom upward and vent out your hot air through the top of your shed. I have gotten the most efficient cooling with this method (again, utilizing the laws of thermodynamics to work FOR you). Get yourself a couple of [these] (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00836E6LM/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1) (if you dont mind the noise) and mount on the top of your enclosure. Use box fans and whatever else you have that will push air from the inside out the top. Make sure the airflow will go through your cards (I would recommend spacing them out at least 4 inches from one another if at all possible.) With this design in mind, once fully set up, I think you will be pleased with the results. It has worked very well for me in the blistering southern heat!

u/th1nkpatriot · 1 pointr/EtherMining

Get a Comfort Zone on Amazon. Prices are jacked at $47, got mine for $30. Anyway this fan works great I bought two.

Comfort Zone 18" High Velocity Cradle Fan, Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002JOS7RI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_XFNLzbWQVSC8Y

Its pretty loud af but who cares... You're mining lol.

I have 1080 Tis running at 55C low and 61C high

Before I added the fan temps would teach 68-73+

I have the rig on a table with the fan on the ground aiming up hitting all the cards and across mobo and cpu. I can stick my hand in-between each card gap and feel a ridiculously strong flow of wind. Right into the intake fans. It took me a lot of repositioning of the fan angle to get optimal temps. And when I added two fans, the temps increased. When I turn the ceiling fan on, temps are slightly higher. ~_^

I always operate in 50C range and anything beyond 60 I don't like. These cards are running 24/7 and I have mine maxed out at nearly 38Mh/s per gpu.

I'd also suggest rearranging those cards to allow for more airflow in-between them, but I think that comfort zone fan would drop your temps by about 13C to around 57C, but, man... That spacing...
https://media.giphy.com/media/l2JHS7po8pGz94TgQ/giphy.gif

u/rjml29 · 1 pointr/OculusQuest

I'd say better than nothing but if you have the room, a floor fan would be better since it'll blow on your entire body as well as the Quest. I use one when I play and it's nice and keeps my Quest pretty cool, as compared to sometimes when I have used my Quest in a different room without the fan.

Something like this is what I use:

https://www.amazon.com/Lasko-2264QM-Velocity-QuickMount-Black/dp/B004IS6JBY/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=high+velocity+floor+fan&qid=1569074998&sr=8-4

Also smaller guys with a bit less air flow if you'd be standing close to where the fan would be:

https://www.amazon.com/Patton-PUF1810C-BM-18-Inch-High-Velocity/dp/B004WT6ZFO/ref=sr_1_7?keywords=high+velocity+floor+fan&qid=1569075074&sr=8-7

u/redwoodser · 2 pointsr/DIY

For over 30 years I have run a fan at night, many different kinds, 5-10 feet from the bed, to help me get to sleep and to stay there. As long as the blades are 10 inches in diameter, your fan should be able to make enough noise, even if the blades are plastic. It might eliminate your ability to hear a lot of noises that are bothersome.

When you speak of windows being loose, I’m thinking that it’s the frame and not the glass pane.
You need to find a few things to put at the side of the wood frame, or behind the window frame where it and the wood meets the one above. Like a small wood wedge, or maybe a butter knife. Something to stop the window from being able to move about when air is passing by.

Imho, you should try a fan. Direct it at the ceiling if you don’t like much or any of the breeze, and just enjoy the sound of it.

Currently I'm running this. It's a bit pricey, but the construction and sweet motor will be helping me sleep for many years. https://www.amazon.com/Tpi-Workstation-Fan-Diameter-Free-Standing/dp/B0002FSOAG/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1474587227&sr=8-2&keywords=12%22+tpi+fan

This looks pretty good. The high velocity motor might give the metal blades what you need.
https://www.amazon.com/iLIVING-ILG8F12-3-Speed-Velocity-12-Inch/dp/B00N1XCQNM/ref=pd_sbs_328_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=NN8BDV3D5X6ASP9W8H6E

u/tgunner · 2 pointsr/fans

The Dyson fans are a gimmick in my opinion; you can do much better for cheaper. Air King makes a nice set of floor fans which I usually suggest. The 12" and 14" models are probably the best for a small to medium size room. You can also point them at the ceiling to really mix the air.

Like the other fans though, these won't cut down on any dust or pollen. Maybe look for a good large air purifier? Many of them are powerful enough to mix up the air like a fan and will still cost a lot less than any Dyson product.

u/Le_Steve_French · 2 pointsr/vandwellers

Leaching onto parent question:
Say i had a 12V car battery like this

and a blower fan like this or more simply an oscilating fan like this

How do I figure out how long the battery would let the fan run on a single charge? As in not hooked up to solar or the car battery.

Any help with how to calculate this would be very appreciated, a fan seems very crucial

u/finnegan-beginagain · 5 pointsr/homegym

Here is what you do:

!) Check out the history of the Central Park Theater in chicago (https://drloihjournal.blogspot.com/2017/10/the-central-park-theater-first-air.html).

2)Once you do that, go get yourself one of these bad-boys: https://asheville.craigslist.org/search/sss?query=freezer&search_distance=10&postal=28801 (I'm assuming your close to Ashville, but you get the idea).
3) Now go and then get one of these: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005JQJHR2/ref=sxbs_sxwds-stvpv2_3?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_p=2708083022714283574&pd_rd_wg=J3x6A&pf_rd_r=YZ5K5XNHA9B3B4NP7QA2&pf_rd_s=desktop-sx-bottom-slot&pf_rd_t=301&pd_rd_i=B005JQJHR2&pd_rd_w=bQ6mi&pf_rd_i=industrial+fan&pd_rd_r=33359447-b610-4ea3-9d46-62556cd5da96&ie=UTF8&qid=1526360334&sr=3 (you'll need the size, trust me).

4)While your at it get https://www.amazon.com/Plastic-Bags-Draw-String-Closure/dp/B00INV51ZM/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1526360405&sr=8-4&keywords=large+ice+bags&dpID=41veVhLMN7L&preST=_SX342_QL70_&dpSrc=srch and a couple-20 of https://www.amazon.com/Arctic-Chill-Large-Silicone-Trays/dp/B00I3LDJJW/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1526360471&sr=8-8&keywords=large+ice+tray. Now, also get some Zip-ties, while you're at it.

Here is the plan:

  1. Lay all the ice trays out in your yard - it's ok that they are black, they are made of silicone - they will be fine.

    2)Now, set up your fan where you want it and plug in your freezer where ever you can. Ideally out of the way of your lifting space but... I mean, we aren't going to be doing much lifting in the heat anyway, so let's consider the order of operations here - step by each.

    3)Alright, take your garden hose and fill up the ice trays. Once filled set them in the freezer over night.

    4)Here is the time consuming part - once you have made the ice in their containers, you are gonna wanna get them out, and into the bags. I know, it's not ideal, but since you aren't working out, hey "Forearm day!".

  2. Okay, the bags of ice are made - the fan is set up - the only thing left to do is zip tie those suckers to the back of the fan, and pump yourself up, in the heat, to do some cool-ass lifting. Crank that sucker on and be blown away by the technology of over 120 years.

    The whole package, is probably about 400-backaroos, but I'm assuming that's O.K. as you were looking for a cheaper option than a full air handler, and spray-foam insulation. If not I can certainly help price that out for you (Although, I'm probably going to recommend geothermal - buy once cry once). Hopefully this helped.

    Honestly, make sure that you have pleany of water and read up on the three metabolic pathways. I've been yankin' your chain. If people can find a way to work out in the UAE you can work out in North Carolina. Go to the jbosss93-perfered-hot-CrossFit-athlete google images page for motivation, remember why you have a home gym to begin with, bring a towel, and wreck house. You didn't build this thing at someone else's house. We all believe in you.
u/generalelectrix · 2 pointsr/lightingdesign

We've got a couple of these little guys. Several people have said it already, but keep the haze channel low and the fan channel high. We also typically use an external fan along with our hazers to give us better control over the distribution of the haze in the room. Did your unit come with a remote? We usually just use the remote's functions to run these guys and not bother with DMX, as I think they have haze quantity and duration controls on the remote.

Something like this: http://www.amazon.com/WindStream-Inch-Velocity-Floor-Table/dp/B007SO2CI4/ref=pd_sim_hg_8

Snail fans are extremely useful for this if you're in a large venue or running outdoor atmospherics.

u/old_fezziwig · 1 pointr/malelivingspace

I need a fan for the same reasons. I've owned many different types, but I always come back to floor fans for the sound that I need and because they move a lot of air.

Metal fans look much nicer than plastic fans. I had something like this that worked great and didn't have a cheap look to it. It also didn't break the bank.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01HHHX64K/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_cbtGxbQEZ9QWP

u/Thracka951 · 1 pointr/HomeImprovement

I’m not normally a home automation guy, but I use Sensibo AC controllers (need to have the ability to use an IR remote control). It’s cut the cooling costs at my house by about $125/month so they already paid themselves off in 3 months.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07MTGD3D9

Big fans help a lot when it comes to moving the air around and keeping the AC cycles efficient.
I have these and love them:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M0X1SOY

I also have applied heat blocking window film on my east and west facing windows that cook in the sun all day.

Beyond that, I’m constantly making insulation and air sealing improvements around the house.

Last year I was paying about $300/mo during the summer, now I’m down to about $150-175.

u/newophelia · 1 pointr/DIY

Aside from the AC unit maintenance tips pointed out by various people, I recommend the following:

Purchase some 8" - 12" round fans with a pivot stand (Similar to this. WalMart typically has these fans for ~$14). Using zip ties, attach the stand to the grill of the AC vents in the rooms where you're congregating. Use these to better direct the airflow from the AC--it'll help "amp up" the flow.

If the attic is vented but there is no existing attic fan, use box fans at both ends of the attic and direct the airflow out.

For the rooms you have sealed off, open the windows and use box fans to pull the air from the room out (same way you're venting the attic). Also, for these rooms, roll up a towel and place it around the bottom edge of the door to prevent as much drafting as you can.

Invest in a good fan. My upper floor has cathedral ceilings with no attic so the highest point is around 14', and the house faces south/eat with little in way of shade trees; the upstairs gets HOT. I recently purchased a Vornado Air Circulator, and is has made a HUGE difference. Before, when I'd get home from work and the upstairs was 93 degrees, I'd turn on the AC and by the time I went to bed, it was a balmy 83 degrees; with the Vornado fan working, it was 77 degrees.

Finally, wash the outside of your windows. Dust particles help trap heat on the windows, so keeping the windows clean will cut down on trapped heat that'll radiate into the room.

u/xlxoxo · 2 pointsr/HomeImprovement

When you tried the fan, where was it located? On a table away from the window?

If you stick a window fan in the window.... The window becomes an exhaust.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/65-Watt-9-in-White-Reversible-Twin-Window-Fan-WDF9-2/302923543

If the opening is big enough, a 20" box fan works wonders, especially for a patio door opening.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Lasko-20-in-3-Speed-Box-Fan-3733/100405665

A high velocity floor, barrel, or drum fan aimed at the window opening works great too.

https://www.amazon.com/XPOWER-FC-300-Professional-Circulator-Blower-14/dp/B07BFHR28Y/

Hope you have a window bug screen... If you decide to suck that cool evening air into the room after sunset.... You'll also be sucking in a lot of insects.

u/Cavej007 · 1 pointr/woodworking

I would recommend a drum fan like this one. MaxxAir BF42BD RED High Velocity Belt Drive Drum Fan, 42-Inches, Red https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005JQJHR2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_CXSsxbK5BHNMK

You can usually find them on CL for much cheaper. But this is what I use and it does a great job.

u/BrandonTartikoff · 1 pointr/videos

You can still buy a good metal fan. If you don't like cheap plastic crap don't buy it. I would bet you dollars to donuts that in inflation adjusted dollars the old metal fan was more expensive.

Here are some good fans you can buy: http://thesweethome.com/reviews/best-fan/

or fans like this are good too

u/data-professor · 3 pointsr/triathlon

I have a bigger lasko that works great with a wide windstream and travels a long distance. I use it for rowing, lifting, and cycling, and is great when we burn dinner.

Lasko 2264QM 20" High Velocity QuickMount, Black-Easily Converts From a Floor Wall Fan, 7 x 22 x 22 inches https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004IS6JBY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_.e-PDbEWBS36Q

u/ares_god_not_sign · 5 pointsr/ExplainMyDownvotes

Like an Air King 9230 or more like one of these?

We've all been "the asshole" on reddit. I love how it forces you to come to grips with it and move on rather than coddling you. Props for accepting it, and double props for not deleting your comments.

u/Malasaur · 1 pointr/Velo

Grabbed one of these after hearing it recommended by the TR guys on their podcast.

http://www.amazon.com/Air-King-9218-18-Inch-Pivoting/dp/B0007Q3RIE?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=od_aui_detailpages00


Pricey but low/med work well for endurance/tempo stuff and high does a good job for anything more intense.

u/MCuthbertson02 · 3 pointsr/bonnaroo

So this is a bit pricey, but it’s worth every dollar. I promise.


Rechargeable Fan

u/mikeywhatwhat · 1 pointr/Velo

I have this Air King and it’s fantastic. Highly recommended. Add a “remote on/off” plug thing and you can turn it on and off without getting off the bike.

Air King 9220 20-Inch Industrial Grade High Velocity Pivoting Floor Fan https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0007Q3RHK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_r0RBCbT28CSJ9

u/OfFireAndFlame · 1 pointr/litecoinmining

I was planning on skipping the small 120mm fans altogether and just stacking three nicer box fans (something like this) where the door would be. I figured that would be enough to keep them cool. Then just exhaust it out the back through a window. If you push the air fast enough, you don't even need cooled air. Ambient temps should be enough. 38C air is still way cooler than the 75C cards.

That being said, let me know how the inline works out. I picked up a 325CFM one without doing much researching thinking that would be enough. Man did I learn that lesson the hard way lol

u/kenp2600 · 1 pointr/homegym

I have something like this that I found used at a yard sale for like 50 cents. Still they're only about $40 new. You could grab a couple of them if you need more airflow from different angles and still be well under budget.

https://www.amazon.com/B-Air-FIRTANA-20-Multi-Purpose-Velocity/dp/B01M0X1SOY/ref=sr_1_4?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1526661213&sr=1-4&keywords=high+velocity+fan

u/Jamieson22 · 3 pointsr/homegym

Screw the box fan. This fan for $39 replicates a hurricane basically. Makes me feel like I am on a motorcycle when on the treadmill.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01M0X1SOY

u/davidrools · 1 pointr/BuyItForLife

Definitely look into industrial fans. http://www.bigassfans.com/ sound funny but are serious business. Air King is a tried and true American maker of serious fans, and can even be bought on Amazon.

u/dgtldonkey · 1 pointr/overclocking

Will do. I was able to stabilize at 3.8 on stock voltage. Prime95 for an hr got my temps up to 56C. I had no BSODs. i have dual 120mm fans on my radiator, in push/pull setup, and I just purchased:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007SO2CI4/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i00

I'm gonna run Prime95 overnight and see what I get. Thanks for the help guys!

u/VA_Network_Nerd · 3 pointsr/networking

It would seem you are considerably more right than I was.

Cisco Power Calculator

Cisco Catalyst WS-C2960X-48FPD-L needs 66W base, plus PoE load.

Cisco Catalyst WS-C3650-48FD needs 105W base, plus PoE load.

Cisco Catalyst WS-C3850-48U needs 121W base, plus PoE load.


The Power Calculator also provides more accurate BTU/h waste heat output values.

That 2960X, for example puts out 434 BTUs of heat with 40 x PoE phones @ 7W.
Without the phones, that 2960X puts out 265 BTU of heat.

So, (265x10)+(434x1)==3,084 measly BTU of heat.

<sigh> I hate being off by that much. Embarrassing.

Good catch, thanks for calling me out on it.

/u/mahanutra might want to try running that closet with a simple fan for a while before investing in active cooling.

Example Fan

u/Benmen10 · 1 pointr/Frat

Get some dehumidifiers and an industrial fan or 2 and you should be good. We had a heat problem at the beginning of this semester and then we got one of these:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00836E6LM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_sFPYzbV127RQD

u/T-Bills · 1 pointr/HomeImprovement

Can't you just use a bigger fan instead of the AC? I have this fan and it moves a lot of air, although maybe a little noisy.

u/idahoJIM · 1 pointr/EtherMining

Metal blade 20" shop fan will do over 4000cfm, just pull off wall rack hardware and drop onto cutout of enclosure and fold some cardboard box for venting into your duct.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M0X1SOY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_efXSAbZW13RRT

u/DrWigglesMcGulicutty · 2 pointsr/Zwift

I picked this up for my second zwift setup. It's inexpensive and moves a lot of air. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0113DA8J0/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/NAPALM_SON · 6 pointsr/nursing

I had a vornado for a while. I upgraded to an Air King recently.

u/jameson71 · 2 pointsr/BuyItForLife

This fan is all metal and blows a TON of air, even on the lowest setting.

u/minerofthings · 2 pointsr/gpumining

Here is what I used. 2 wire shelves. 1 shelf holds 4x 8 card rigs (last rig sits in the front 'exhaust' area on top of a normal PC box). 1 shelf holds the fans that blow on the rigs. Air is blown over the rigs and to the front of the tent, and exhaust fans placed in that area for exhaust.
Tent: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MB68BEI/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Wire shelves:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B7E8Y9M/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Blowers for exhaust (I use 2 of these, exhausted out the window):
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01CTM0LLO/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Fans for airflow, sitting inside the tent on one of the wire shelves (I have 3 of these):
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004IS6JBY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Hope that helps.